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Thread: Enclosed trailer flooring

  1. #1

    Default Enclosed trailer flooring

    I'm looking for some ideas on what to put down on our enclosed trailer floor. We bought this new last fall and just got it about 2 weeks ago and plan on using it to haul sleds/atvs and to camp in. Would like something in the way of a good quality indoor/outdoor carpet but i'm open to suggestions. Am thinking i'll get some SLP ski boots for the sleds so the carbides don't tear up the plywood.

  2. #2

    Wink

    Honestly. It is just a floor and a ramp. The gouges will only get so deep and then quit. If you go putting something on the floor that holds water and ice, you will be sorry later on. The floor plywood is treated. Floors are expected to get used. Use it.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  3. #3
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    Default

    My trailer has a painted plywood floor. It shows no signs of anything more than light wear. The rear ramp will take the most wear. I went to Lowe's and bought a carpet remnant that works nicely for camping weeks/weekends. It rolls up and stows allowing the sleds to fit and once unloaded the carpet comes out.

  4. #4

    Default

    I've got SuperGlides on the front and rear ramps so I'm not worried about them getting torn up. The carpet remnant sounds like a good idea to use while we are camping out in it. How's the traction for the track on bare plywood? I don't want to put anything permanent on the floor like glides since we plan on sleeping it on cots.

  5. #5

    Default

    I have built many custom trailers for motor sports people. Best thing I found was putting down a thin sheet of diamond tread aluminum over the plywood floor whether it was for a Ferarri, dirt race car, harleys, dirt bikes, atvs, or snowmobiles.

    There is nearly zero traction on plywood with mtn sleds. With a small amount of momentum you can drive in/out if it is pretty level. With good carbides and or studs, it wont take long to destroy a plywood floor. It will groove, splinter, get wet and rotten, groove, splinter, get wet and rotten, etc

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AkHunter45 View Post
    I've got SuperGlides on the front and rear ramps so I'm not worried about them getting torn up. The carpet remnant sounds like a good idea to use while we are camping out in it. How's the traction for the track on bare plywood? I don't want to put anything permanent on the floor like glides since we plan on sleeping it on cots.
    My plywood floor is usually covered in ice this time of year. That makes the traction worse than bare plywood but still I have no problems getting in and out. Occasionally the skis will be stuck down and I need to rock the sled. No biggie. I always empty the trailer and thaw the floor before heading off to camp, like at Arctic Man. Get there, roll out the carpet, set up the cot...home sweet home.

    The only plywood damage I have is on my rear ramp where a friend's kid and wife have tried to load up without enough speed to get up the ramp. Spinning studs on the ramp make sawdust very quickly. Other than that my main floor is in great shape after three years of sharp carbides and occasional studded tracks. The plywood will eventually get soft from spending so much time being wet. By soft I mean it'll flex under your feet in between floor joists. That hasn't been a problem for me, even in my older trailer that had several more years on it. My ramp ply is easy to replace so I never worried about the stud damage. When it bothers me enough I'll change it.

    Did somebody really say diamond plate aluminum? Once the carbides hit that you're dead stuck. Even a 5" aluminum threshold on my shed door causes me problems! Besides that I'd bust my butt with snowy boots on cold aluminum. I did that this morning climbing into one of my freighter sleds!

  7. #7

    Default

    I'm not all that worried about the floor being wet, we have a propane rv furnace in our trailer. I also plan on knocking off as much snow and ice of the sleds before I load them, though I know I won't get it all. I guess there isn't much I can do as far as putting something down that the track can grab since I don't want something permanent on the floor. I think using the SLP ski boots will prevent the plywood from getting torn up unless there is another option that I don't know about.

  8. #8
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    Funny you say that. I bought two pairs of ski boots when I got my new trailer. Both pairs are sitting downstairs on my shop floor....unused. They're a pain. Or maybe I'm just impatient.

    I too have a forced air RV furnace built into the trailer. I only use it for sleeping and wrenching. The floor will stay iced for a long time even with the furnace running.

  9. #9

    Default

    Are you wanting to part with those boots? If so, let me know how much and maybe we can work something out. My trailer isn't that big, 18x8.5 and that incldues the V-nose so it gets warm pretty quickly. I've also got about 6 boxes of Flexi Tiles that I could cover the floor with but I worry about water seeping inbetween the cracks. http://www.flexitiles.com/productinfo.htm

  10. #10
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    Check your PM inbox.

  11. #11

    Default

    are you going to glue them down or just loose?

  12. #12

    Default

    Lay them down loose, they recommend you do it that way. It would make cleaning the plywood floor easier too.

    Mr Pid, e-mail sent.

  13. #13

    Default

    Spray the entire floor with RINO-LINING !

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