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Thread: Cone head question

  1. #1
    Member LItoAK's Avatar
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    Default Cone head question

    When tying a fly with a cone head how do the pro's get the material tied of inside the cone and make it look so full and nice? I.E. The dolly llama. Mine turn out looking like it has some kind of collar.

    http://www.alaskaflyfishinggoods.com...f702a2a3c5.jpg

  2. #2
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
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    Default thread size

    What size thread are you using? I found that I have a problem getting the finishing thread inside the cone if I use really thick thread like 3/0 or big fly. I have the best luck with 6/0.

    Jake
    All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

  3. #3
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Practice. Really, that's about it. Someone else might have some secret, but I think it's really just minimizing your thread wraps and working as close to the cone as possible. There's been some previous discussion on the dolly llama in this thread.

    Keep the rabbit a little long where you tie it in under the cone and push it up under the cone with your bobbin. Minimize thread wraps and then glue generously up under the cone to make sure everything stays locked together.

    Some things I haven't done personally, but might be worth trying as I think about it. Perhaps tying a bump with thread just behind where you're going to tie in the rabbit strips and flash to kind of push everything towards the front under the cone. Also, check out this page on tying sculpzilla... the author finishes off the fly with a thread wrap in front of the cone, which would help push the cone back over your thread wraps.

    Honestly, it may not look as "pretty" as you'd like, but I really doubt the fish are going to care if it has a little collar.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  4. #4
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wyo2AK View Post
    Honestly, it may not look as "pretty" as you'd like, but I really doubt the fish are going to care if it has a little collar.
    I think that last sentence sums up most flies people tie. I have noticed the same thing, fish don't care if you fly is tied perfect, it is your fishing buddies who will give you crap about it.


    Jake
    All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

  5. #5
    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    Default

    I use some dubbing right behind the cone to finish it off. If your tying a black leech use black etc. It looks symetrical and it's where I glue my eyes to.

  6. #6

    Default

    you could also try a half a turn or so less before trying off behind the cone. It usually has more to do with the amount of material then thread wraps themselves.

    There is no need for a wrap in front of the cone. Honestly it doesnt make sense, it will get destroyed in short time fishing, unless of course you're gluing it with hard as nails. Ends up being one more unneeded step, though I will add, it does look nice.

  7. #7

    Default

    I figure if I'm using cones, I'm after weight, so I make the tying easy on myself. I take 2-3 turns of lead wire on the bare shank after putting on the cone, then shove it up inside the cone. Starting your thread behind it keeps it there and holds the cone in place.

    When you're finishing the fly the increased diameter of the lead wire makes it a bunch easier to avoid your thread falling off the front of the material when you shove it up under the cone. Been there, done that, got the t-shirt.

    Small stunt, but it really eases finishing off coneheads.

  8. #8
    Member Skookumchuck's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I figure if I'm using cones, I'm after weight, so I make the tying easy on myself. I take 2-3 turns of lead wire on the bare shank after putting on the cone, then shove it up inside the cone. Starting your thread behind it keeps it there and holds the cone in place.

    When you're finishing the fly the increased diameter of the lead wire makes it a bunch easier to avoid your thread falling off the front of the material when you shove it up under the cone. Been there, done that, got the t-shirt.

    Small stunt, but it really eases finishing off coneheads.
    Good Idea! Woulda never thought of that. I've never got the hang of tying pretty coneheads either (cohos never cared though). Usually just go for big barbells b/c their cheap n' easy. I'll try it this out next season...thanks for sharing.
    Nice Marmot.

  9. #9
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Pinch?

    This doesn't always turn out great. Not something I read anywhere, but I tie/fish leech ptrns a lot, often coneheads and over time noticed that my conehead leeches look better than they did when I started out. Here's what I do:

    1. Usually, I can pinch the fly material just behind the conehead in a way that leaves my fingernails forming V-shaped ramps.
    2. Loose wraps around my fingers, then slide down the nail-ramps as I tighten them - sliding under the conehead (when it works).
    3. A neat whip finish is tricky unless you can whip finish without a tool.

    Packing bulky material too close to the conehead complicates the technique. But, leaving too much room defeats the purpose too.

    Good luck.

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