Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25

Thread: Women Living a Remote Lifestyle

  1. #1
    Member alaskabushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    I presently live and work close to Lake Clark
    Posts
    150

    Default Women Living a Remote Lifestyle

    I am curious to know, if there are any women living in a remote part of Alaska without the usual modern amenities except, Internet Satellite? Do you haul water, heat with wood, use an outhouse, hunt for your food and so on? It would be interesting to know. Or women who live without any modern amenities.

  2. #2

    Thumbs up

    Yes, there are some.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  3. #3
    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    little log cabin on the river
    Posts
    645

    Default

    yes there are some.
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

  4. #4
    Member alaskabushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    I presently live and work close to Lake Clark
    Posts
    150

    Default Just curious

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Grandma View Post
    yes there are some.
    You hear from mostly men and I am always wondering how women get along with life in the "BUSH". I see you are married and that probably helps. Do you know of any single women doing it? I love living in the "BUSH" especially at my age. It is a challenge sometimes. So, I was wondering what challenges women have living the lifestyle.

  5. #5
    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    little log cabin on the river
    Posts
    645

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabushrat View Post
    You hear from mostly men and I am always wondering how women get along with life in the "BUSH". I see you are married and that probably helps. Do you know of any single women doing it? I love living in the "BUSH" especially at my age. It is a challenge sometimes. So, I was wondering what challenges women have living the lifestyle.
    Sure having a spouse or companion sure helps in all aspects of living in the bush. I know of more single men doing it than women, but there are a few.

    Challenges? I'd say women probably have the hardest time with the lack of socializing when way out in the woods, especially if you are single. If you are with someone, you have to really get along well with your partner/spouse. But the physical work can be a challenge as well...wood (even more so when you cook solely with wood as we do here), chopping out a water hole in -40F, water hauling and laundry to name a few. Then there can be the challenge of raising and educating children too. That's a whole nuther ball of wax.

    Whether you live in the woods or in the city...you either like where you are at and what you are doing or you don't. I been living this lifestyle for 30 years and I still love it.

    Speaking of work...I have 8 sled dogs to take care of this morning, then I want to get some wood chopped and water hauled and get the sauna fired up for a nice hot steam this evening.

    Life is good!
    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

  6. #6
    Member alaskabushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    I presently live and work close to Lake Clark
    Posts
    150

    Default Ha! Ha!!

    Funny you mentioned chipping a water hole. I just now came back in from chipping mine open. I let it go for about 3 days and it took me about 20 min. to open it back up. I discovered a way to keep it from freezing real quick. Tomorrow, I will split wood and then, it's baking time. I actually tried having a woman companion but, everyone I have met that seemed interested lasted maybe two months and wanted to go back to the road system. Oh well, that's life. I'm afraid it's not like the old days anymore. Take care. Nice chatting.

  7. #7
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default Values

    No doubt the relentless work is a hurdle that takes awhile to overcome. I met a woman who homesteaded in Cooper Landing. She lives alone now, but still lives there. She told me a little about her place. As she described hauling water out to her horses everyday (we talked one winter day), her eyes brightened. If anything, she sat up straighter. There wasn't a bit of regret or any note suggesting she regarded her work as drudgery. She went on to describe a gift of bear fat a friend had dropped off for her.

    Of course, growth of amenities in that location has likely made her life much simpler than it used to be. But she evidently had found something there; the self-reliance maybe, or some confidence that she had everything worth having there. I think it was the way she perked up talking about the bear fat too that made an impression.

  8. #8
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabushrat View Post
    I am curious to know, if there are any women living in a remote part of Alaska without the usual modern amenities except, Internet Satellite? Do you haul water, heat with wood, use an outhouse, hunt for your food and so on? It would be interesting to know. Or women who live without any modern amenities.
    give me a about two yrs......to finish college, ill get back with yah

  9. #9
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Grandma View Post
    yes there are some.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=22431
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  10. #10
    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    little log cabin on the river
    Posts
    645

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabushrat View Post
    Funny you mentioned chipping a water hole. I just now came back in from chipping mine open. I let it go for about 3 days and it took me about 20 min. to open it back up. I discovered a way to keep it from freezing real quick.
    I would love to know your secret about keeping the water hole from freezing. We have several methods that work, but eventually the hole closes over and you have to chop out a new one. Some years the ice can get very thick, some years it freezes down to the bottom and after all that chopping there is no water.

    This water hole we chopped out a few years back was something else. One of the kids would go down and scoop out the ice chips until we finally hit the liquid as it got deeper and deeper. Thank goodness for the long handled ice chisel, no way an ax would have worked that year. Boy did it geyser up when we finally punched through.




    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

  11. #11

    Default

    I use a 4' X 4' by 2" thick blue board (Dow-Board) glued to a 4' X4' sheet of 5/8" CDX Plywood. Then set a red highway cone on top to mark......for safety of man and aircraft........

  12. #12
    Member alaskabushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    I presently live and work close to Lake Clark
    Posts
    150

    Default

    I have a couple of ways I do it.

    1. I usually do a 3'x3' hole, put spruce boughs about 6" thick all around it, then put a piece of plywood over it and cover it with as much snow as possible.

    2. I just recently found that I could take a cooler, cut the bottom out and stick it in the hole, this keeps it from closing in. Again, put spruce boughs all around it and cover the spruce boughs with snow.

    I see you have real thick ice and you have to these in the deepest part of where you get your water from.

    I also have a large plastic garbage can that I put chunks of ice in and keep it in the cabin to melt to have extra water on hand.

  13. #13
    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    little log cabin on the river
    Posts
    645

    Default

    Thanks for the replies.

    Yeah, we usually do the mound the edges, top with plywood, then a piece of tarp and cover the whole works with as much snow we can muster. This does keep the top from freezing so much even when it gets really cold. However with a hole as deep as that one in the pictures we get a lot of freezing at the bottom and around the edges that are in the water. Eventually it will end up like a cone with a very small hole at the bottom. The ice chisel is the only tool that can get down there, other than an ice auger (which we don't have). But it just shaves as it slides down the cone and you still get very little ice off toward the bottom. This plunging/shaving the sides action makes for some tough arm and wrist work trying to work the angle of the chisel to scrape the lower sides, along with some very icy and wet trousers

    We've done the ice melting for water many a time too and have a plastic drum we can use to keep it melting. By that time of year if we can't find liquid water the river has so many pressure ridges and huge, deep cracks that it doesn't take too much effort to chop up and gather a few buckets of ice. But, 2 buckets of ice, even finely chopped sure don't make 2 buckets of water and it takes close to 10 gallons a day to keep my sled dogs fueled up, so I really have to keep on top of it when melting ice.

    Thankfully this year we had just enough snow early on and not too much cold so the water hole isn't a big chore...so far
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

  14. #14
    Member alaskabushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    I presently live and work close to Lake Clark
    Posts
    150

    Default Here's a thought

    How about a clean 55gal. drum both ends cut out? Just start your hole early, insert the drum.

  15. #15
    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    little log cabin on the river
    Posts
    645

    Default

    Nope, it would freeze in the river and I'd never get it out. Hate to see stuff like that float down the river in breakup.

    Heck for the most part I enjoy the water getting. As everything else around here it is self satisfying and makes you feel good. It makes you stronger, gets you outside, and well eww, it would make this great, crystal clear and clean river water taste like barrel
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

  16. #16
    Member alaskabushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    I presently live and work close to Lake Clark
    Posts
    150

    Default O,K.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Grandma View Post
    Nope, it would freeze in the river and I'd never get it out. Hate to see stuff like that float down the river in breakup.

    Heck for the most part I enjoy the water getting. As everything else around here it is self satisfying and makes you feel good. It makes you stronger, gets you outside, and well eww, it would make this great, crystal clear and clean river water taste like barrel
    I concede on the barrel.

  17. #17
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    Grandma, You guys ever go out and cut the ice with a chainsaw in about 4' chunks when it 's about 8"-10" thick and store them? We used to do 4'x8' piece's ( dad was always thinkg big, lol) and whats left over in the spring cover with moss. We had a sawmill close, so we covered it with sawdust, but if you start with a hole big enough you could get those kinda chuncks all winter, and last you til the fall, and still keep a good supply of water coming in if you did it in a couple of places. Your hole's will get smaller as time goes on, but by the end of winter you won't want to be lugging those blocks out anymore,lol

  18. #18
    Member alaskabushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    I presently live and work close to Lake Clark
    Posts
    150

    Default Chainsaw

    I tried the chainsaw once and it left oil on the ice.

  19. #19
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    Well when we first started out doing this Dad handed us the one handle cross cut saw, lol, then a couple of years later he bought 2 Mac-10s Whoo-whoo, He told us if we screwed up the one he gave us, we'd be back at the cross-cut, lol. (This went for cutting wood to) We said heck lets try it, and worked fine til we filled the filter with water, lol Then it was back to the hand saw til we learned to do it right. Make sure the oiler don't have oil in it, and if you do get a little on the chunk, chip it off. Leave your chain a little losser than you usally do, it might wear out bar a little quicker but you ar'nt using it that long. As long as you can keep it under 10" thick you can get a few chuncks in very little time.

    Back then it was'nt a big deal to get a couple of drops of oil in the water, I don't know what they use today, maybe fill it with Crisco, lol it's been awhile since I've done that.

  20. #20
    Member alaskabushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    I presently live and work close to Lake Clark
    Posts
    150

    Default Naw!

    I will stick with my chipper. Get more exercise this way. Besides living in the "BUSH" I prefer quiet as much as I can get. The only time I use a chainsaw is cutting wood.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •