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Thread: Getting Started

  1. #1
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Question Getting Started

    I recently moved to an area that has good access to a slew with some bunnies running around. It is still quite close to houses and I don't think is a aapropriate to take my .22 down there to hunt bunnies and grouse. Ive shot a few bows just messing around with friends but never really considered it for hunting until now. What would be a good way to get started on small game with a bow. What kind of bow, arrows etc. About how much should I expect to pay to get started. I have a nice back stop and half a dozen straw bales so practice should be ok. Is there a book out there that is the beginners bible if you will? Im not sure I need another hobby but I am interested.
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    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
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    Man for hares you can use just about anythign you can get your hands on. I myself started out with an old hand me down PSE compound... can't beat free! Get some blunt tips for your arrows... or judo points or whatever and go shoot some.

    Have you shot compounds, recurves or longbows? Any would do great on hares. What did you have in mind?

    Like I said though, i'd just get any old cheap hand me down you can come across that fits you and go start shootin!

    One thing to remember... if you are hunting in snow and woods you might want to get some cheap arrows as they might not all be found if you miss. At least not until the snow thaws. Get some bright fletchings at least. And a real heavy compound might not be the best choice if you don't want to bury those arrows too.

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    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default Cheap

    Yeah something cheap is what I had in mind. I was thinking a nice little recurve around the 45-50 lb range might just be the ticket.

    The only real experience I have with a bow is bow fishing for carp back home and that was a lot of fun. We used an old compound. I have no idea what brand it was but it shot pretty good. Or at least my inexperience thought it did. I might go cruise the pawn shops this weekend and see what I can find.
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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    First thing is to hook up with some trad shooters there in Fairbanks, nothing like having some help especially when learning a new hunting technique. When looking for affordable high quality bows think classics, Bear, Pearson, Wing. Pearson bows especially are way undervalued for the quality right now. One of the best shooters in my collection is a 1963 Pearson colt, current value $100 shipped! I monitor e-bay, Craig's list and 3 traditional archery web sights daily for bows, e-bay is probably the easiest.
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  5. #5
    Member yogibear's Avatar
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    Default A good start

    I agree with Rick about getting with other archers and learning the ropes. One thing about trad bows is the learning curve, very tough compared to compound. Regardless of your choice, absorb as much as possible from those that know. An excellent online resource for bow hunters is huntersfriend.com for all types of shooting. They are more geared towards compound bows, but many of the rules apply acroos the board. Good luck and stick(and string) to it. You won't regret it.

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    Member moose-head's Avatar
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    I like the judo tips for small game. They have little wires that stick out of the sides that hit the ground and stand the arrow up so that you can recover all of your arrows. Otherwise arrows tend to go subterranean and disappear.
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    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Yes losing arrows would suck, they arn't cheap.
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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Better start looking for cheapo arrows I loose an average of 4 on most small game hunts and judo's do nothing to stop an arrow in snow! Bright fletchings help but coming home with fewer arrows is part of the game with the smaller critters. Tradgang.com is by far the best traditional archery sight.
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  9. #9
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Yeah I figure Ill loose a few. Hopully I can find a few in the summer months if I get lucky. I doubt Ill be buying carbon fiber.
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  10. #10

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    paint the ends bright pink or orange...they almost glow in the snow..just follow the entrance hole by using another shaft, you'll find most of your arrows...pretty simple

    The summer up here is a different story. The ground can be so dang soft in many places even judo's dont stop them! (not to mention they are flippn spendy!).

    For hares I'd buy the large HTM rubber blunts and head shoot them. They work extremely well! focus on the eye, not the ears or you'll barely miss plenty of them LOL! I need to get my arrows made up I'd like to get out chasing hareas again, buddy says they have a great recipe....so far I dont care eating them so I stopped hunting snowshoes...they definatly are fun to bowhunt!

    Look up instinctive shooting with G Fred Asbell. If there was one book I'd consider a must read it is this one. The next would be Become the Arrow by Byron Ferguson. Two completely different styles of shooting, both work extremely well. Both books will get you going in the right direction fairly fast.

    Learning to shoot a stickbow isnt hard, it's time consuming. Once you get things set up and tuned the learning curve is steep and fast. There is a huge bench to climb before going from a good to a great shooter. If you stop shooting for a period of time (like I have with the torn rotator cuff this last year), your shooting skills will drop significantly, almost embarassingly so! The hardest thing with traditional gear is getting set up right. This takes time, lots of it. Finding the right spined arrows and getting things tweaked for how you shoot can be, at times, nothing short of a headache.

    learning proper form and learning how to to tune a trad bow is the two biggest significant factors you can do to lesson that learning curve by a steep amount!

    Good luck with it! The ride is definatly worth it!!!

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