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Thread: chrono in winter

  1. #1
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    Default chrono in winter

    I just got a choro for christmas and I went to use it this weekend and i couldn't get it to read. Has anyone had any problems with using them in the cold. It was -1 or so when I was shooting and I was thinking that have something to do with it.

  2. #2

    Default Winter Chrono

    Hello--I have been using my chronograph in the cold temps and off-angle winter light for several years--here are a couple of things to try: my chronograph likes to have the sky screens when light is dim. Apparently they diffuse the light in a way that makes the shadow of the bullet show up better to the sensors. Nevertheless, try using it without the screens if you aren't getting a reading with them on. It seems a bit unpredictable which way will work in any given condition. If there simply isn't enough ambient light, no reading will occur (late dusk, for example).

    Cold weather makes batteries perform poorly, so be sure you have a brand new battery(ies) in your unit in cold temps. Another easily made error in setup is to have the sensors plugged into the wrong sides of the electronic unit. The nearest sensor is plugged into the "start" connector on the unit.

    Hope one of these ideas gets you going with the chrono. It will be a very fun addition to your shooting kit.

    Best Regards,
    Jim

  3. #3
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Default

    At temperatures below freezing the LCD display will cease to function, probably something to do with it being a "liquid" crystal display, also try putting those little catalytic hand warmers on the battery to warm it. Or take the whole thing into your warm vehicle and thaw it periodically. Good luck! Stay warm!
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  4. #4
    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Default

    I was at the range 0630 this morning, it was 45 and I thought I had it rough. You guys are tough as nails, -1 degrees

  5. #5
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Friend of mine in Delta Jct. recently tested some loads for temperature variations at -40f. Pm me your e-mail and i'll forward the results. I was going to post it here but couldn't get it to save as a file to transfer onto the thread.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  6. #6
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    Default lighting

    I've been running my chronograph all winter, at temps as low as 0 F in December and January. The LCD has never given me problems, but I've learned some tricks with getting it to read.

    Basically, on a sunny day the day is brighter but the sky is actually not as bright as on a cloudy day. Clouds diffuse the sunlight across the sky, the same way the sky screens diffuse the light. So if it's a clear day you need the sky screens, summer or winter. (This from the directions that came with my chronograph).

    On a cloudy day you won't need the sky screens, although it should still work fine with them on in the summersince there is more than enough light. In the winter on a cloudy day I've found I can still get readings for longer in the afternoon if I take the diffusers/sky screens off. The extra light to the sensors is more important than diffusing it twice.

    The hardest time for my chronograph is on a clear winter day. Then I have to use the sky screens, which cuts out some of the precious light. Not such a big deal in summer, but on sunny winter days my chronograph will only read reliably in the mid-day hours.

  7. #7

    Default

    I have noticed that my conograph will not read if I set it up to close to muzzle on guns like 7mm Rem. Mag. I have to move it 8 to 10 feet from muzzle or I will not get any reading. Mine will read 2 to 3 feet from the muzzle on calibers like 223, 243, 6mm, 270, but will not read 7mm Rem. Mag. unless I move it a few more feet. It wil show a blank screen.

  8. #8
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    AKarcherdaddy nailed it. I haven't had a problem with cold in the winter, but have had problems with lighting.

    I found that I had to put cardboard strips on the S side of my chrono (our range runs E/W) to shade the sensors from the flat winter light.

    As to lacation, I like to put the chrono at least 10' from the muzzle, sometimes I have to stretch it to 15'.

  9. #9
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    I have one of the first Ohler chronographs and have to use the skyscreens on blue sky days. I recently did some research on how low of a temp the LCD displays can still be used at for a friend in Lousianna that was concerned that the recent cold snap would freeze his display and found that at temps of -30 were still not of concern.
    Hope that helps.

  10. #10

    Talking

    Use a lithium battary better cold out put you could use them in parralle if needed for very cold weather. A lantarn might produce enough heat to keep the dis play light. Mine has a remote display coupled by a phone wire.

    I think if I had nice weather thu sub-freezeing I would put a colman lantarn or buddy heater under my shooting bench to help keep the display and the boys warm.

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