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Thread: Muzzle breaks

  1. #1
    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    Post Muzzle breaks

    Want your opinion on muzzle breaks,whats the ups and downs with them?
    And who makes the best brakes?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Thumbs down hatem!!

    While effective, they are absolutely obnoxious to anybody not shooting the rifle. Obnoxious to the point of being deafening. IMHO if you need one, get a smaller caliber or better yet a heaver rifle.

    Dave

  3. #3
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    Default

    I just purchased a rifle with a muzzle brake. Although I'm not a big fan of them for the reasons Dave stated, it does tame the recoil of the rifle. It is significantly louder to the side than anything else I have, including a .375 but the recoil is mild. Oh, its an 8mm Rem Mag. So I won't run out to equip my rifles with them, I'm in no hurry to remove this one.

  4. #4
    Member Skligmund's Avatar
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    I shoot my 300 RUM, and even though it has fairly substantual kick, I wouldn't dream of putting a muzzle break on it. It is plenty loud enough, and I can take a few hits (I can shoot 20 rounds in a sitting comfortably).

  5. #5
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    One of my favorite sheep rifles is a very accurate 300 RUM that weighs 4.5 lb. - the muzzle brake is a valued addition.

  6. #6

    Default Muzzle Breaks

    Friends of mine use them and like them. I have never used one and probably never will. I have shot a bunch of 250 gr. .338 loads off the bench and quite a few .375 loads. Alot of recoil management is mind set and technique. The potential to damage ears is real with any gun but worse with a muzzle break. I am intrigued by their looks though, all those holes and slots. Makes me think they would be a good halibut/lingcod jig. If you feel you need one then have at it.

  7. #7
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    I have had one on my FN mauser in .300 magnum for 15 years..I love it.Its a KDF muzzle break.I can shoot all day if i wanted and not really feel it..handloads and all.I no a .300 magnum isnt a big gun but im 5'6 160 lbs..so recoil is felt.But i swear by mine, its the best.Its loud ,,but thats why God made earplugs.And when im hunting I dont even notice the sound to much.But definetly while target shooting I wear my plugs,,,,,,and so does anyone with me.But knowing this gun is barely gonna punch is a great assurance .Just my opinion....

  8. #8
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    Default Have you considered Mag-na-port?

    I went around this mountain a while back and figured I did not want the noise or happen to shoot an animal while next to my hunting partner and blow his ear drums out. I settled for a Mag-na-port job on my 325wsm. Keeps muzzle jump down and reduces recoil by about 15-20 percent they claim (the claims seem to be accurate according to my research). Not quite as much recoil reduction as a muzzle brake but enough to make a difference at the range on the bench. Perceived recoil while hunting doesn't seem to much of issue for most guys. Except that reduced recoil and muzzle jump can help in a qucker follow up shot I suppose. Mag-na-port also does the mag-na-brake (a muzzle brake) which the claim directs the muzzle blast forward some as opposed to straight out. Might be worth looking at. You can take the brake off and put on a cap for hunting but use the brake at the range.

    I just got my barrel back last week and haven't shot it since the mag-na-port but will post my thoughts after I do. Need to mount up my new talley light weights and remount the scope. My hunting partner just bought a new 700 XCR 338RUM. He's going to fire a couple rounds just to see what the recoil is like (no scope mounted yet) and then ship it off for mag-na-porting. He can then have a comparison after it gets back.

    So, in a few weeks or so we should be able to give you some direct comparisons for a mag-na-port job on a 325 kimber mt and a 338RUM XCR.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  9. #9

    Thumbs up Levang Linear Compensator

    The Levang Linear Compensator ports the sound/propulsion waves forward so the noise roughly follows the bullet direction, but in an outwardly expanding cone shape. While this was originally designed for AR15's, others have copied it and applied it to bolt guns. Not as effective as a JP or Defensive Edge or a Ben Cooley or a dust kicker like the radial multi-ports such as Vais and the multitude of similar designs, but it still reduces felt recoil by approximately 30%.

    http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/sto...AR+COMPENSATOR

    As far as personal experience, I've got an Armalite Brake on my Armalite AR that came with the gun, one on my Ruger #1 300Wby mag wildcat in the form of a custom Shilen that's been Magnaported (EDM'ed into the barrel and functionally still a propulsion gas brake) and I had Magnaporting on my 3-Gun competition Rem 1100 that was stolen and they made all of them painless within reason, except the Armalite as it's only .223, it makes it even better as it's like shooting a .22. The more reactive brakes also allow you to spot your own shots, and, in the case of IPSC/USPSA type competitions, to be able to focus on the fast paced shooting with no muzzle rise or sway.
    Last edited by codeofthewest; 12-26-2006 at 22:31. Reason: data

  10. #10
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    Red face

    Second the post that reccomends a smaller rife instead of installing a brake. Have a brake on a TC super 16 handgun 45 70 , and none on a 15 in. 375 JDJ ENCORE. If I had a choice I would go with no brake, the noise is worse than any recoil IMHO. Bill.

  11. #11
    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    Default

    I guess no break then,thanks for the input

  12. #12
    New member mtcop71's Avatar
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    Default Wild West Guns

    I have a .378 Weatherby mag and I took it to Wild West Guns and they put a break on it. I love that thing and it saves my shoulder, especially since I have had 2 surgeries. I only use that gun for Brown Bear though!

  13. #13
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    I'm an advocate of muzzle brakes and I've used em since 1990. I have used the KDF style and they do seem to increase the muzzle blast but I don't find it objectionable. The recoil reduction is impressive and I wear hearing protection both at the range and just before I shoot in the field. I simply tell people I hunt with to watch out cause its loud. If you want a rifle that recoils less your options are really either to choose a lighter caliber, a heavier rifle or a muzzle brake. All three options reduce felt recoil. My two cents...

  14. #14

    Default Muzzle Brakes

    This topic has been kicked around here before and the replies seem to be roughly evenly split.

    I'm an advocate as I've had a KDF on a Sako Fiberclass 375 since 1988.It reduces felt recoil down to the 270/30-06 level.Since this rifle barely goes 8 lbs scoped and loaded, it accomplishes exactly what I wanted it to do.

    I once shot about 30 rounds of 300 gr Bear Claws at dassies in South Africa prone and in shirt sleeves.I suspect I'd have had less fun without the brake.

    While I'll accept that noise levels do increase with a brake, I've personally never noticed it.Another advantage (granted, minor) is that the brake provides protection for the muzzle and crown in case of a slip or fall.

  15. #15
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    Default

    A brake will also reduce the amount of muzzle flip some rifles exhibit. I once owned a 6 lb 7 oz 375H&H that would really kick. The kick was manageable but the muzzle would raise up at least 45 degrees. This caused me to lose sight of what I was shooting and limited my abilities to get a quicker second shot if needed. I added a brake and not only did it decrease the muzzle rise but it also reduced the amount of felt recoil.
    Yes, they are extremely noisy. Ear plugs and muffs are required at the range and ear plugs should be put in if you have the chance in the field. On this particular rifle I valued the light weight carrying abilities over how much noise it made and the brake was a great choice. None of my other rifles are braked at the moment but if the need arises I would install one again.
    Tennessee

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