Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Thread: How are You Successful?

  1. #1

    Default How are You Successful?

    Why is it that some people are so successful and others go years without even getting a shot? What tricks or tactics make you more successful than the average Joe. I have my own idea's and opinions but lets hear what everyone else has to say. Thanks

  2. #2
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    knowing your area well, the common traits of that area and the habits of the animals that live in it...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  3. #3

    Default

    I agree with Vince, the more you learn the area you are hunting, the more successful you will be there. I'll elaborate on a few more points that I think are worth discussing, even though some might be off base, these are from my experiences.

    Patience... to an extent - Sometimes people overdo the patience game. When conditions change, you have to change with it and sometimes move quickly. I'll try to allow myself as much ground as possible to stalk in or set up an ambush, but if I see a better opportunity after I've set up, I'll generally take it.

    Wind - Gotta play it right, the nose knows.

    Strategy - Set up a game plan before starting the stalk. Get some landmarks and take it a step at a time. Think about what the animal might do and where it might go, and set up accordingly.

    Instincts - This comes with experience. Knowing what an animal might do based on what you've seen in the past, or sometime you have a feeling that it'll happen if you go that way, then follow your instincts.

    Reading the animals demeanor - Sometimes you can tell an animal doesn't want to be messed with so you have to consider if you really want to get in close and risk pissing it off. I've held off on grizzly bear stalks because the bear just looks mad, and I didn't have a back up. Sometimes critters don't pay much attention and rely on their nose and hearing only. I've snuck in on a lot of critters that seemed to be paying too little attention to what is going on around them.

    Movement - even when you are seen, doesn't mean the game is over. Stay still and play it out, let the animal make the next move before you do. Even after an animal might bust you and head out, if you still have a visual on it, watch it and plan a new strategy to close the gap again. I've done this a couple times with the same critter and even though I was seen, I think the critter finally felt as if I wasn't as big of a threat as it did originally. I've persued lots of stalks after getting busted, and although it is few and far between that it works out, there are those few times that it has.

    Hurry, but don't rush - You gotta be ready when the moment occurs, but don't screw up at the last second and get seen drawing your bow or moving into position. Slow, steady movements can work when the animal is looking in your direction, but be prepared to draw back and hold it for a while, or wait till the animal passes and take that quartering away shot.

    Holla! - If you are at full draw and the critter busts before you can shoot, yell at it or do something to get their curiousity up and stop them. Caribou are known for this, and more often than not, they will stop broadside and look back at you offering a great shot, but possibly a little further out. I've taken a few caribou this way, the most recent at 50 yards after I stalked in to 10 yards and got busted by the wind.

    Practice - especially out to long ranges. Makes the shorter shots easier, and gives you an idea of your maximum range you should be shooting.

    Luck - Sometimes it just pays to be lucky.

  4. #4
    Member ret25yo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Unit 13
    Posts
    1,471

    Default

    Some Years I just try harder then other years

    If you cant stand behind the troops in Iraq.. Feel free to stand in front of them.

  5. #5
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,272

    Default

    An Archer has figured out all that is required to get within that magic circle of death.
    Many folks can go into the field and spot and kill game at a couple hundred yards. However, the successful Archer has figured out almost all aspects of the hunting game. When I started bow hunting, I wasn't a very good hunter in general. If I had to pick the single most important thing that made the most difference, it would be scent control. I became a fanatic about it.
    Bow shots are hard to come by, so be ready to make the most out of each opportunity. Practice, practice, practice, I made sure that I drew my bow and practiced with the clothes that I hunt in. I learned that I could get by with more movement if I got higher in the tree.

    Stay at it, took me many years before I could tag out every season. I even got frustrated and quit once. After a while you just get the feel for it.

    I hunted this deer hard, even hunted after surgery. But when I let that arrow go it was an incredible feeling. He is the largest deer I have taken out of over 100 and to do it at 15 yards with a bow was a highlight in my hunting career.


    Good luck

  6. #6
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    Simple some of are hunters as a lifestyle, others think hunting is a sport. Those who scout, practice and study year round do well, others don't.
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

  7. #7
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick P View Post
    Simple some of are hunters as a lifestyle, others think hunting is a sport. Those who scout, practice and study year round do well, others don't.

    interesting you put it that way Rick... not to fault those that do, but it simply is NOT a sport for me.

    i don't hunt small game when i don't need meat, i don't hunt big game when i don't need meat... when i know the time is coming for me to go get some i plan months on it and spend months in the field KNOWING all around me there.

    practice? I don't care for that word... practice killing....i can no longer do, nor will i teach practice killing to my kids with out them knowing the results of it to me... Practice killing is SPORT hunting sport hunting is killing for the fun of it with little real need of the resorce..Study is a better word. you can study with out killing or educating the resource to your end result.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  8. #8
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    Practicing the skills of hunting, profanity with your weapon, stalking, tracking ect is essential to ensuring a clean and humane kill when the time to harvest an animal comes. I don't see it as practicing to kill to me it's practicing to not cause needless suffering. I do like your word usage though, studying dose have a deeper, maybe more acurate meaning.

    As you know I can not, will not, view killing as a sport or game animals as a commodity. I'm OK with sport hunters, nothing on earth lower than a sport killer!
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    All-I-SAW, AK.
    Posts
    1,035

    Thumbs up

    I agree with stid and Jerod. It all makes sense. Don't be afraid to walkout of the woods unsuccessful either. It's all part of the game. Sucessful hunts are also hunts that didn't get a tag punched. Pay attention to your surroundings, learn all you can about the animals that you pursue and try hard; success will come. Luck... That's just is what it is, sometime you have it, sometimes you don't... Also, more time in the woods offers more encounters. Those that spend more time on the couch will never kill as many critters as those that are actually out there doing it. My .02....

  10. #10
    Member MNViking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    746

    Default

    I'm the luckiest SOB in the world. That's how I do it.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

  11. #11

    Default

    Great stuff, I can tell you all have spent some time in the woods. Keep it coming I enjoy the input and tips. Does anyone else have tricks up their sleeve that help them to be successful? I know one trick to make elk bugle earlier in the season. You simply walk down the drainage you intend to hunt and spray large amounts of cow in heat sent on likely travel routes. Several days later all the bulls in that area will bugle. Any good tricks for moose?

  12. #12
    Member algonquin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seldovia, alaska
    Posts
    839

    Default time in the woods

    Time in the field is a big thing, be it early scouting or going out and staying out until you have a shot.
    A comment on the ethic of killing; I took a friends son(he didn't hunt) out deer hunting and after a day of exploreing and seeing a fawn & doe at 10', we had a doe tag, we passed. On the way out of the woods that night he said what a great time he had but too bad we didn't get a deer. I said we did, we just didn't kill them. The thought washed over his face and a smile formed with a understanding more of what we were doing out there.

  13. #13
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,391

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by algonquin View Post
    Time in the field is a big thing, be it early scouting or going out and staying out until you have a shot.
    Indeed. Effort is key for me. I don't possess any special knowledge or skills, no secret technology in my backpack, but I do spend a lot of time afield. I think that time spent during the offseason is a huge part of my success, and also just putting in the miles during the season, even when I don't see much or when the weather isn't ideal. Exploring new areas has been a big part of my success, and spending lots of time hiking in non-motorized areas has introduced me to areas that I would later hunt successfully. Luck plays a role, but luck favors the prepared.

  14. #14
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I agree with the "know you are" stance. I still hunt moose which likely puts me in the minority up here. I hunt thick woods and I have weeks upon weeks spent wondering around the same couple hundred acre area. Moose are predictable, they take the same paths and go to the same areas on a regular basis. They may pick a new tree to scrape their antlers on but it is likely within sight of the one they scraped them on last year. They bed in the same areas, not day to day but over time you can find the bedding areas and if they are not in one then they are in another. I usually base how I am going to hunt my area on the wind. Depending on how it is blowing is how I decide the best way to approach each prime spot. My only problem is getting close to a LEGAL animal. I got within 50' of probably 40 animals last year, from cows to bulls in the mid to upper 40's, just nothing in the SF50 or with the required number of brow tines. Sometimes I wonder if ADF&G passes out flyers too all of the legal moose the week before opening day!

  15. #15
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,391

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    interesting you put it that way Rick... not to fault those that do, but it simply is NOT a sport for me.

    i don't hunt small game when i don't need meat, i don't hunt big game when i don't need meat... when i know the time is coming for me to go get some i plan months on it and spend months in the field KNOWING all around me there.

    practice? I don't care for that word... practice killing....i can no longer do, nor will i teach practice killing to my kids with out them knowing the results of it to me... Practice killing is SPORT hunting sport hunting is killing for the fun of it with little real need of the resorce..Study is a better word. you can study with out killing or educating the resource to your end result.
    Vince, I've been thinking about your post for the past day, and I've gotta call B.S. on some of it.

    Didn't you take a shot at a fox in your yard earlier this winter? I can't imagine that you needed that meat. I know, I know, predators are different - but still, you see that there is a time and place for killing when it is not only about needing meat. Your post above sounds like you feel otherwise.

    As for hunting small game when you don't need meat, I was thinking of that yesterday while I was hunting ptarmigan. I've got a freezer full of caribou and other associated game meat. I don't need more right now. That being said, the ptarmigan we killed yesterday will be eaten for dinner this week, thus saving one package of caribou meat for another day. That will in turn allow us one more meal of caribou later on if we do happen to get to a point where we really need meat. I can't always wait until I run out. Killing more meat now means that I'll still have some later if the next hunting season doesn't go as planned. Call it "practice" killing in a derisive manner if you will, but if the meat is being eaten, it is a net positive to a family's food supply and therefore a very good thing. I do teach practice hunting..or sport hunting...or whatever else you want to call it to my nephew. We go hare hunting when his freezer isn't bare. We then clean the hares, take them home and share a meal with his family. It is a good thing and teaches good lessons that he will carry afield when he goes after larger game that will really fill the freezer. And after he shoots that moose next fall? Well, we'll probably kill that ptarmigan in the trail on the way back to camp and cook it over the campfire, even if we don't "need" to.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Cheap View Post
    Why is it that some people are so successful and others go years without even getting a shot? What tricks or tactics make you more successful than the average Joe. I have my own idea's and opinions but lets hear what everyone else has to say. Thanks

    Like anything else in this world, some people just take it more serious than others. More books, videos and articles have been made on this very subject than you can shake a stick at. It's just a majority of hunters don't take the time to learn it and even fewer make the effort to apply it.

    Ryan
    "If you are not working to protect hunting, then you are working to destroy it." ......Fred Bear

  17. #17
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Craig on POW
    Posts
    166

    Default

    What a great question and a tough one to give a definitive answer to. Every bowhunter that has put in their time knows the frustration that comes with hunting with a bow. When I talk with rifle hunters who speak proudly of 300+ yards shots I think wow they missed the whole hunt.

    If I had to break down what makes a bowhunter successful in bringing home game I'd say patience, practice, persistence, and knowledge.

    Patience in every aspect of the sport. From shot selection to time to develop into a proficient archer. It just don't come easy. You've got to put in your time to get good.

    Practice, may be a poor choice of words. I don't consider it practice when out roving or shooting 3D. But you get the point - use your equipment a lot. So much that you know how it and you will perform under every imaginable shot condition.

    Persistence, some just refuse to give up. You can't be lazy and continually be in the top echelon of bowhunters. Go the extra mile, get up earlier, stay out later. Don't let down in the field. The second you think there is no game around they pop up just out of bow range and have you pegged.

    Knowledge - You've got to have a thorough knowledge of the game you are after. Anybody can get lucky. But you don't want to just get lucky, you want to continually put yourself in a position where you've got the best chance to succeed. You can only do this if you already know where the animals are likely to be and how they act.

    The odds are already stacked against you, you've got to do everything you can to try to even them out.

  18. #18
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Vince, I've been thinking about your post for the past day, and I've gotta call B.S. on some of it.

    Didn't you take a shot at a fox in your yard earlier this winter? I can't imagine that you needed that meat. I know, I know, predators are different - but still, you see that there is a time and place for killing when it is not only about needing meat. Your post above sounds like you feel otherwise.

    As for hunting small game when you don't need meat, I was thinking of that yesterday while I was hunting ptarmigan. I've got a freezer full of caribou and other associated game meat. I don't need more right now. That being said, the ptarmigan we killed yesterday will be eaten for dinner this week, thus saving one package of caribou meat for another day. That will in turn allow us one more meal of caribou later on if we do happen to get to a point where we really need meat. I can't always wait until I run out. Killing more meat now means that I'll still have some later if the next hunting season doesn't go as planned. Call it "practice" killing in a derisive manner if you will, but if the meat is being eaten, it is a net positive to a family's food supply and therefore a very good thing. I do teach practice hunting..or sport hunting...or whatever else you want to call it to my nephew. We go hare hunting when his freezer isn't bare. We then clean the hares, take them home and share a meal with his family. It is a good thing and teaches good lessons that he will carry afield when he goes after larger game that will really fill the freezer. And after he shoots that moose next fall? Well, we'll probably kill that ptarmigan in the trail on the way back to camp and cook it over the campfire, even if we don't "need" to.
    i also went out for wolf and yotes brian.. those are fur that have other uses.. call bs... if ya like but there is a large difference and i stated i dont fault those that do.. i have had enough hard years to know when it is time for a meal. but you have yet to spend a day in the field with me to know how i truley feel about it..
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  19. #19
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,391

    Default

    Vince - Didn't mean any offense, brother. I just see value in hunting small game even when there isn't a true need for the meat right at that time. And yes, there are other uses for fur, but you mentioned a "need for the resource". That raised my eyebrow.

  20. #20
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Brian. man you should know by now it takes a TON to offend me... none taken..

    there is a transition we as hunters all go through... i think i am reaching the end of mine.. though i love hunting i have little desire to kill an more it has become a chore almost anymore ( the killing part) between growing up on a farm and harvesting wild game for food.. i would have to guess no less then 1000 or more have gone under my knife so... you can see my weariness of it..

    hence one of my reasons for posting here.. it was a short 25-30 years ago i was thirsting for knowledge and my first moose, bear or other big game..

    every wild bunny or grouse fell to my guns and bows.... as many of your age group now do... I know i am in my mid forties and not that older then many but... i have years of doing many do not. and some of those years were harder then others.....i pass my knowledge on to my children and like minded young people i meet here.

    the last few years is the first in my adult history i have not had to struggle to put food on the table for my family.. I know true and well the meaning of the resource... i also know i am far from done as a hunter while my family needs it, we use an average of two moose, and bears and bou a year and the kids are growing still.....

    i have learned, studied, and done what you and your age group now do. i have a good sense of what an animal or a man will do... if that makes sense?

    study an animal group, learn their traits and you get better at collecting them. Caribou are the easiest to pattern in a group... the single bou is the hard one to sneak up on... moose are predictable in their daily habits and study of man they don't know.... and bears are curious ...

    good hunters are more then lucky. they use the animals natural habits to his benefit and adapt his skill to it. ask around our military group here.. the best hunters of men are those that learn and study their quarry.

    many may disagree with those thoughts but it will one day come to them that they too have learned studied, gotten to know that area or the habits of the game they seek.

    Practice? I hope that i never have so much that i no longer shed a tear over the slain at my feet. though i plan hunts and adventures some for me and some for others... the adventure is what i seek now days ... when i need meat i will gather it. like my elk hunt i am hoping for, More to see an elk before i die then to eat one. and die i will ... prolly sooner then later... who is keeping track then?
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •