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Thread: Rivited Boats have feelings too!

  1. #1
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Default Rivited Boats have feelings too!

    I dont see why everyone bashes these riveted boats. When I was looking for boats I passed up some good deals cause they were riveted boats. When you read this forum everyone said welded was the way to go and riveted boats are a lesser quality.

    Finally I did get a boat that was riveted. Well sort of. Just the benches and braces are riveted. Seems to me that major seams and anything that handles any stress is welded. wich is about how most brands are. My boat is a crestliner. The riveted Lowes are the same way.

    The boat is a little lighter, but Its still not flimsy. I think it is just a hair thinner in guage as a welded boat like a G3. but is a 100 pounds lighter.

    After Running this boat all summer it seams plenty tough to me. I banged on a few logs and rocks and you cant tell it on the bottom save a few scratches that are visible.

    And this boat is water tight and its going on its 9th season.

    The best selling point for why a riveted boat isnt all that bad is "if you dont like riveted alluminum, then stop flying in Planes" Whoever came up with that has a point.

    Anyway, I just read another recent post bashing the riveted boats and I thought Id chime in and say they are not all that bad. Especially for a first timer looking for a good deal.

  2. #2
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Hey Matt-

    There are thousands of rivetted boats out there which do just fine. I think the rub comes in (no pun intended) when folks really do a lot of dragging over beaches and sand bars with them which loosens them up. Additionally, eventually, they will begin to loosen up and leak... but in normal use probably not soon. Don't feel like a second class boat owner because you are not. Folks who disparage are usually looking to feel better about having spent a whole lot more cash (or be in a whole lot more debt) than you did/are.

    As for the comparison with aircraft, however, planes don't have to hold out water, so the point is somewhat moot.

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    My first boat was an 18' Smokercraft Alaskan that I bought used in 1977. I ran it on the Kenai mostly until 1985 when I bought a welded sled. The guy I sold the Smokercraft to was a friend of mine and he ran it until 1995 when he sold it. It is painted bright red and I still see it from time to time. The boat has to be over 35 years old and still seems to float pretty well. Rivetid boats are just fine if, like anyting else, you take care of them. I have had to repair cracks and leaks in welded boats so they aren't perfect either.

  4. #4
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I don't think there is a problem w/ riveted boats as long as you use it for things riveted boats are good at. That is not banging into rocks and running it up on gravel bars. I am not a very good boat driver, I try but I make mistakes so I purchased an older welded boat and I don't cry when something gives me a thump. If I ran the Kenai or other similar waters then the price of a riveted boat and a prop o/b would be a big selling point. Better to be fishing a good hole in a riveted boat than busting brush and getting tangled with all the guys on the bank who are saving their pennies to buy their "dream" boat.

  5. #5
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Default

    I have seen some beat up old riveted boats that do leak, But those were really thin guage boats Especially for as long and wide as they were.

    There is an old Smokercraft up at my cabin that leaks. But it is 20 years old and fills up with rainwater every year wich Puts alot of stress on those rivets. But once you bail it out, it will keep the lake out for a few days

    I dont feel like a lesser boat owner thats for sure. I just wanted to point out to prospective boat buyers to not shun a riveted boat right off the bat. Especially if you are in the market for a used one.

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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    I grew up with a 14' 1972 Starcraft with a 20 HP Mercury. Dad bought it new, we used it every summer in rivers and and lakes. Boat is still running strong and no significant leaks. I will say, dad took good care of his boat and turned it over every winter. I think if you take care of it, and don't abuse it, it will do what it was meant to do.

  7. #7
    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Everyone of us including me owns a 'lesser' boat. There is always going to be someone with something better. A wierd human trait is to have to compare everything and judge things by their relative value (comparing with what others have). The reality is we should all just judge what we have against what our use is and what we need, and we would probabily be much happier. The same can be applied to our houses, income, etc.

    Back to the specific topic, is it fair the say that rivited boats are better suited to fresh water and not salt due to crevice coorosion issues?
    2009 Seawolf 31'
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  8. #8

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    The best boat will always be the one that puts your butt safely on the water so you can wet your lines.

    My first river boat was a 14' riveted hull of some mysterious make. I ran it for 20 years. It also had a brand motor that some say is a poor excuse for an outboard.

    This motor finally gave out after 1 rebuild & 15 years of hard use & way to many props replaced to remember. This boat over time had silicone & epoxy patches placed over holes from rocks.

    With the motor screaming wide open, belly full of peanut butter & jelly.....& beer. Headed up river through a shallow, log infested run, in the dark, well past midnight, One hand on the tiller the other holding a light.
    My mind drunk with the excitement that being on my favorite river brings.

    I had no monthly boat payments. Which allowed me to spend more time using my lowly riveted boat on the river.

    That boat helped me learn more than any other single thing , about the river, how to run it & fish it.

    Jeff "Kawriverrat"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kawriverrat View Post
    The best boat will always be the one that puts your butt safely on the water so you can wet your lines.

    My first river boat was a 14' riveted hull of some mysterious make. I ran it for 20 years. It also had a brand motor that some say is a poor excuse for an outboard.

    This motor finally gave out after 1 rebuild & 15 years of hard use & way to many props replaced to remember. This boat over time had silicone & epoxy patches placed over holes from rocks.

    With the motor screaming wide open, belly full of peanut butter & jelly.....& beer. Headed up river through a shallow, log infested run, in the dark, well past midnight, One hand on the tiller the other holding a light.
    My mind drunk with the excitement that being on my favorite river brings.

    I had no monthly boat payments. Which allowed me to spend more time using my lowly riveted boat on the river.

    That boat helped me learn more than any other single thing , about the river, how to run it & fish it.

    Jeff "Kawriverrat"
    or what it's worth, my riveted 1952 Larson Watercraft (Crestliner) has no leaks and never has had as near as I can tell, my 2005 all welded Crestliner (made in the same plant) is a perfect boat also............
    Last edited by whube; 01-24-2010 at 09:05. Reason: wrong post

  10. #10
    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    We run nothing but riveted boats for my work and we work them hard. We're running them on the Y-K delta so it isn't rocky rivers. But we regularly drag them through mud, run them up on mud beaches and haul huges loads. They get treated pretty bad and tend to hold up well. I think we finally got a leak in our latest one after 10+ seasons are hard use and with folks that don't take care of them.

    Nothing wrong with a riveted. I'm thinking of getting one for my 40 Etec to run rivers up here. Its a prop now so if I go with a jet I need to save weight anywhere I can.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post

    As for the comparison with aircraft, however, planes don't have to hold out water, so the point is somewhat moot.
    They fly at 500 MPH through rain storms,, I think they do need to keep out water. Grumman Goose and Widgeon's regularly land in salt water,I think they quit making them in the late fifty's and their still being used today. most airplane floats are riveted, however they are notorious for leaking.

  12. #12

    Default I vote no!

    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    Everyone of us including me owns a 'lesser' boat. There is always going to be someone with something better. A wierd human trait is to have to compare everything and judge things by their relative value (comparing with what others have). The reality is we should all just judge what we have against what our use is and what we need, and we would probabily be much happier. The same can be applied to our houses, income, etc.

    Back to the specific topic, is it fair the say that rivited boats are better suited to fresh water and not salt due to crevice coorosion issues?

    When I was looking for a boat several years back I found a great deal on a Lund cabin cruiser. I contacted the factory with my suspisions of the boat not holding up in salt water. Lund told me they were actually designed for the salt. I sold that boat to a freind a few years back and you can find it in a slip all summer every year in Seward. Absolutely no corrosion, no leaks, no loose rivets. Still a very fine boat.

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