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Thread: Whisperlite Intl. vs. Dragonfly

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    Default Whisperlite Intl. vs. Dragonfly

    Which one of these stoves "performs" best? I'm not looking for the lightest stove available, just one that is very versatile and has a full range of heat. Durability and user-friendlyness is a concern as well. Thanks.

    Brent

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    Member polardds's Avatar
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    Default Best is Relative

    Both burn multiple fuels. The dragonfly is loud. The whisperlight is well much more quiet. You can get good stable bases for both. The dragonfly you can feather the heat, the whisperlight is harder to do that with. The dragon fly has a wider spot to place a pot without it falling off. It all depends on what you want to do with the stove and what your personal preferences are.

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    Default .02

    The dragonfly is probably the better stove all in all, but it is ridiculously LOUD. Way, too loud IMO. I'm back to wisperlite. Oldie but a goodie.

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    Quote Originally Posted by okbowman View Post
    Which one of these stoves "performs" best? I'm not looking for the lightest stove available, just one that is very versatile and has a full range of heat. Durability and user-friendlyness is a concern as well. Thanks.

    Brent
    When I used to camp often, I used a dragonfly and my partner used a whisperlite.

    The dragonfly is far louder but it brings water to a boil MUCH faster. I also found it to be slightly more reliable. The whisperlite seemed to require maintenance and I've yet to have to do anything to my dragonfly. It's still my primary camp stove 12 years later.
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    If you're frying eggs, get the Dragonfly. You can get a low flame with the Whisperlite, but the flame control acts too much like an on/off switch. And then you have to continually fiddle with it as pressure drops or it goes out on you. For serious cooking the Dragonfly is the ticket, but if you're heating up freeze dried meals, either will work. You specified "full range of heat," so that would be the Dragonfly. Others have warned you about the noise.

    Another option might be a butane/propane fuel stove. Those are really easy to control the heat with, but you have to buy disposable gas canisters. They may not be available in all remote locations. They also loose power in very cold weather.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Strutz View Post
    If you're frying eggs, get the Dragonfly. You can get a low flame with the Whisperlite, but the flame control acts too much like an on/off switch. And then you have to continually fiddle with it as pressure drops or it goes out on you. For serious cooking the Dragonfly is the ticket, but if you're heating up freeze dried meals, either will work. You specified "full range of heat," so that would be the Dragonfly. Others have warned you about the noise.

    Another option might be a butane/propane fuel stove. Those are really easy to control the heat with, but you have to buy disposable gas canisters. They may not be available in all remote locations. They also loose power in very cold weather.
    Thanks. That's good info. I'm actually not impressed propane anymore as my propane stove recently failed on a cold weather hunting/camping trip. Temps were at 3 or 4 degrees, and the propane wouldn't "flow" very well.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Strutz View Post
    If you're frying eggs, get the Dragonfly. You can get a low flame with the Whisperlite, but the flame control acts too much like an on/off switch. And then you have to continually fiddle with it as pressure drops or it goes out on you. For serious cooking the Dragonfly is the ticket, but if you're heating up freeze dried meals, either will work. You specified "full range of heat," so that would be the Dragonfly. Others have warned you about the noise.

    I'll second that. I had a Dragonfly that I used the heck out of. One of the reasons I got it in the first place was the ability to simmer. Well 10 years later when it broke (not a quality issue, I did it) and needed to get a new one, I realized I had never once used it to simmer anything, so I decided to go with the Whisperlite since it was smaller and lighter. Both are great stoves but the dragonfly if you want the ability to simmer.

    Ryan
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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    I have the Dragonfly and am very happy it. Like others have said it is loud but I for some reason am comforted by the noise. Its hard to go wrong either stove though.
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    I've done a little research, and for all around use the answer is always the Dragonfly. The only onther stove that might be a contender is the Coleman 442. Does anyone know how it stacks up against the Dragonfly?

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by okbowman View Post
    I've done a little research, and for all around use the answer is always the Dragonfly. The only onther stove that might be a contender is the Coleman 442. Does anyone know how it stacks up against the Dragonfly?
    Coleman makes some good equipment but you will never be able to compare one of their stoves to an MSR stove.

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    common baby light my fire......cuz sometimes the stove top stops working.

    good ole fasioned quaker oats.....yeah baby...yeah!


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    mainer its good to see you have a backup even when at home! My wife won't let me fire mine up in the house only in the garage or on the deck. I don't see what the big deal is just a little open flame, the refreshing smell of white gas, and the afterburner noise of a Dragonfly? Women are so silly!
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    "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - George Orwell

    Before taking any of my advice for granted on here research the legal ramifications thoroughly I am not the Troopers nor am I the Judge that will be presiding over your case/hearing. Please read the hunting and sportfishing regulations and feel free to interpret their meaning on your own.

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    Quote Originally Posted by okbowman View Post
    I've done a little research, and for all around use the answer is always the Dragonfly. The only onther stove that might be a contender is the Coleman 442. Does anyone know how it stacks up against the Dragonfly?
    I've got a Coleman 442, a MSR Whisperlite, and a MSR XGK. The XGK is good for only one thing: boiling water quickly. It sounds like a jet engine with the afterburner lit! As many here have said the Whisperlite is extremely good and some folks seem to have some success simmering the Whisperlite. I haven't had great luck doing that with my Whisperlite. My 442, though heavier than my MSR stoves, is my preferred stove. It boils water about as good as my Whisperlite (I've never actually timed either in this regard), its quiet like the Whisperlite, and it simmers exceptionally well. An additional benefit of the 442 is that its self contained fuel tank is ample for a brief two or maybe three day excursion. IMO the Coleman 442 is a truly excellent stove. When I use it in cold temperatures I generally try to carry a small amount of "fire ribbon" (a paste fire starter)to pre-heat the stove before lighting. The fire ribbon isn't a hard requirement in cold temps as I've also pre-heated it with a stick match which works as well. Either way, 15-20 seconds of pre-heat and the 442 lights easily and reliably.

    WhiteFish

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by broncoformudv View Post
    Coleman makes some good equipment but you will never be able to compare one of their stoves to an MSR stove.
    Having the two MSR stoves (previous post) and a Coleman 442, and using them all a number of times, I would take issue with your statement. In my experiences I think the 442 is comparable. I wouldn't take my 442 on sheep or goat hunt, but I certainly would choose it for a hunt where weight and pack size isn't a critical issue...such as a drop camp or float for moose. As of yet I haven't had a failure with my MSR stoves or my Coleman perhaps due to annual maintenance, but I always bring repair parts for either when I go on an extended hunt.

    WhiteFish

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteFish View Post
    Having the two MSR stoves (previous post) and a Coleman 442, and using them all a number of times, I would take issue with your statement. In my experiences I think the 442 is comparable. I wouldn't take my 442 on sheep or goat hunt, but I certainly would choose it for a hunt where weight and pack size isn't a critical issue...such as a drop camp or float for moose. As of yet I haven't had a failure with my MSR stoves or my Coleman perhaps due to annual maintenance, but I always bring repair parts for either when I go on an extended hunt.

    WhiteFish
    Whitefish I did not mean to offend you with that statement and never meant to tarnish Coleman's reputation. They make great products I just think MSR stoves are a notch above them for extreme use. Yes for general use I have a Coleman 2 burner stove and love it and it has never let me down either. But I wouldn't use it for a backpacking hunt.

    I agree the XGK is an outstanding stove if you only want to boil water. That beast is even louder than my Dragonfly!
    Last edited by broncoformudv; 01-24-2010 at 09:03. Reason: forgot something

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    Quote Originally Posted by broncoformudv View Post
    Whitefish I did not mean to offend you with that statement and never meant to tarnish Coleman's reputation. They make great products I just think MSR stoves are a notch above them for extreme use. Yes for general use I have a Coleman 2 burner stove and love it and it has never let me down either. But I wouldn't use it for a backpacking hunt.

    I agree the XGK is an outstanding stove if you only want to boil water. That beast is even louder than my Dragonfly!
    No offense taken, and I appreciate and understand your perspective regarding the stoves. I've had very good luck with both brands of stoves, but the ability to simmer the stove for a can of slow cooked SPAM (I can't help it I'm addicted to SPAM when I'm in the bush!) as well as not having to hook-up a fuel canister wins me over to the Coleman 442. Thankfully, when it comes to stoves, we have some good options for consideration.

    WhiteFish

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteFish View Post
    No offense taken, and I appreciate and understand your perspective regarding the stoves. I've had very good luck with both brands of stoves, but the ability to simmer the stove for a can of slow cooked SPAM (I can't help it I'm addicted to SPAM when I'm in the bush!) as well as not having to hook-up a fuel canister wins me over to the Coleman 442. Thankfully, when it comes to stoves, we have some good options for consideration.

    WhiteFish
    Whitefish you can have all the Spam I will not be fighting you for it! My dad always brought some along and I couldn't stomach the idea of it much less the smell cold or cooked. Sardines or kippered hearing I am all about.

    Having a built in fuel canister/tank is a true benefit on shorter trips and one less thing to go wrong.

    I have been able to simmer with my Dragonfly but it does take a little tinkering to get it just right unlike Coleman stoves.

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    I don't think ive ever simmered anything with my MSR WLI.....im lost....what should i be simmering....i want to try it out so i can make my stove inferior and have another excuse to someday consider another. what the heck do you simmer with a group cook stove? Ive cooked flapjacks, omlets, bacon, grayling, moose, whitefish,salmon,halibut,italian cutlet, melted chocolate........some girls want to spice up the outdoors yah know?, and other various things.....but is there something in the great outdoors that should be simmered? a white sauce that is milk based? what?

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    Quote Originally Posted by broncoformudv View Post
    Whitefish you can have all the Spam I will not be fighting you for it! My dad always brought some along and I couldn't stomach the idea of it much less the smell cold or cooked. Sardines or kippered hearing I am all about.

    Having a built in fuel canister/tank is a true benefit on shorter trips and one less thing to go wrong.

    I have been able to simmer with my Dragonfly but it does take a little tinkering to get it just right unlike Coleman stoves.
    Broncoformudv;

    If I ever have the pleasure of sharing a campsite with you we'll have to post all-night bear patrols with SPAM, sardines, and kippered herring wafting through the air! If that aroma doesn't bring em to camp...

    This thread reminds me of a post I read sometime ago; Someone said the sound of their Whisperlite in camp sounded like an old friend in camp. I always thought it was a great statement as I yearn for hearing the sound of my stove every year.

    WhiteFish

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    I don't think ive ever simmered anything with my MSR WLI.....im lost....what should i be simmering....i want to try it out so i can make my stove inferior and have another excuse to someday consider another. what the heck do you simmer with a group cook stove? Ive cooked flapjacks, omlets, bacon, grayling, moose, whitefish,salmon,halibut,italian cutlet, melted chocolate........some girls want to spice up the outdoors yah know?, and other various things.....but is there something in the great outdoors that should be simmered? a white sauce that is milk based? what?
    Mariner_in_ak; You've got to pay attention! S l o w C o o k e d S P A M ! The cooking aroma is on par with the smell of the desert after a rain. My wife gets pretty giddy over a meal of SPAM and Mountain House corn as I do (Proof that there is someone for everyone!), so I completely agree that some girls want to spice up the outdoors. But I'm curious about the melted chocolate?

    WhiteFish

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