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Thread: Hard bottom inflatable

  1. #1
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    Default Hard bottom inflatable

    I am looking at buying a 12 or 14 footer and am wondering what people have. I have one with an inflatabel keel now and want a rigid one. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default RIB

    Rigid inflatables are cool!! I have a 20 foot zodiac hurricane 590 and it is and extremely capable boat. Not too many of them around. A good place for information on multiple brands and their varioius problems is ribnet forums. Search ribnet forums on a search engine and you'll find it.


    Chris

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    Default Thanks

    Chris thanks for the reply. I was able to dig up some info.

  4. #4
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    Default places to check

    ribcraftusa.com (marblehead, mass.)
    northwind marine (seattle)
    polarisboats.com (b.c.)
    yes, rib.net has loads of info, too.
    i have a 21' ribcraft, aluminum hull, if you'd like any info on it, p.m. me.
    good choice of boat. very safe. good luck in your hunt. j

  5. #5

    Default

    OK, forgive me on this, not trying to hijack the thread.
    I'm not a big boater, had a jet when I first came up but sold it after a couple of years (not enough use) and have seen a few of these hardbottom inflatables around.
    What is their appeal? I see an inflatable for portability (off the water) and "regular" aluminum or fiberglass for durability. What do you gain out of the mix?
    Mike
    Mike
    www.alaskaatvclub.org
    There is a faster way off the mountain, might hurt a little though.

  6. #6
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    Default stability

    (Excuse me if this posts twice. Having problems here.)

    Mike: RHIBs (rigid hull inflatable boat) were invented for stability and speed in rough seas, primarily, which is why they are used by the SEALS, SAR operations, etc. They are "unsinkable", too. Before I bought mine I did a lot of reading/talking to learn what was "the safest thing on the water".... or some general consensus thereof. I don't have a lot of experience w/ mine yet, but so far am impressed w/ it. The ACBs (alum chambered boat) is a new twist on the RHIB idea, and may prove to be even better. Time will tell. If you ever see one on the water, ask for a ride. If it is Bagel Blue you will probably be boarded right quick. If you are curious, check out rib.net. Tons of info there and some good links. j

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    Default Ditto

    I will also take you for a ride no questions asked.
    As for advantages, unsinkable is the best advantage. Handling in rough water as high speeds is right up there. I have a 20 foot boat, my deck space is little more than 1/2 of that of a regular 20 foot boat. That is the huge drawback. Most 20 foot boats are rated at 6 people or less, Mine is rated for 11. (I can't remember the weight limit though, but a few pallets of bricks won't be a problem.) Possibly the best advantage of a RIB, When you really want to go and there is a chance of bad weather, depending on your ability to handle the boat in rough weather, your tolerance for poor conditions, and your drive to get out and fish/dive/hunt/ect, you may be the only one under 30 feet to blast out in the small craft advisory and not be too worried about it. (I do it for fun)
    Chris

  8. #8
    Member SEEBLAZE's Avatar
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    Default

    Have to agree with Chris on this, I have a smaller 11.5' zodiak with a aluminum hull and it's a night and day difference. I have a buddy who has a inflatable same size as mine and mine is 10X's more stable. Also tried to take it out without the motor and flip it over two guys and we couldn't flip it. I also tow it behind out of PWS bear hunting and it just glides smooth and even though it's small that keel can cut some waves run a little 15 with 2 guys it moves at about 20mph. I have put 5 people in it transported back and forth to shore and also loaded it with gear never any problems. I would recomend a aluminum hull to any boater looking into inflatabes. May not be my dream boat but it does float.

  9. #9
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    Default seeblaze

    where'd you get an 11.5' alum hulled Zod? thanks. j

  10. #10

    Default RIBs RULE

    I can't say enough positive things about ridged inflatables.

    I ran a 23' ALMAR RAIV with a 350 and Hamilton jet when I worked as a Marine Deputy. It was awesome!

    The RAIV was tremendous in huge nasty lake waves (which can be closer together and not predicable). For example on one of the lakes I patrolled, under normal flat conditions it was a 30 minute run to an island. On a really nasty night it took us 2 hours in a 26' ALMAR Sounder and we were taking waves over the bow! On another nasty night it took me 1 hour to cover the same distance in the 23 ALMAR RAIV. The tubes also help insure no waves over the bow. I could jump one wave and clear the next. AWESOME, tremendous boat! Handles like it's on rails and a real confidence boaster in big water when things turn bad.

    http://www.almarboats.com/2004/content/raiv.php

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