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Thread: Is a bird just a bird...

  1. #1

    Default Is a bird just a bird...

    ... when it comes to hunting dogs? This might be a dumb question, but can you take a dog that has hunted nothing but quail or chuckar and put them on grouse and have them perform with the same results?
    "If you are not working to protect hunting, then you are working to destroy it." ......Fred Bear

  2. #2

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    Don't think it will be an issue at all. A little bigger in size but pretty much the same from the dogs point of view.
    If you were going for waterfowl.....then there is a difference in texture, size, smell and water as a factor.

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    Take your dog hunting and let the dog sort it all out. A good bird dog will learn the tricks and the whereabouts of different game birds in short order. Certainly your dog might have some initial trouble handling forest grouse, and perhaps not know what objectives to search out, but pup will learn soon enough. Be supportive and understanding and just take that dog hunting and both of you have a great time! Piece of cake.

    Jim

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    I cant wait to be in those shoes. Good luck man.

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    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default The learn fast

    My shorthairs grew up on Chukars. They have learned to point and look for ruffies in the trees up here. I was really impressed when they first started doing it. Ptarmigan was an easy change.
    I'm going to ctrl-alt-delete you so hard your mama's computer is going to reboot.

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    Byrd_hntr,

    I don't believe I've had the pleasure of meeting you, but if you have GSPs I need to tell you of a call I got the other day. Military person needs to get his 8 month old pup to a new home. He's asking $900, paid $1,000. Sounds like a nice dog, but I've got a kennel full of Brittanys and I can't take another dog, at least not at the moment. Know of anyone who might be interested?

    Jim

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    Member Burke's Avatar
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    Default transitions

    I agree with the above...dogs will figure out a game bird is a game bird! Just like when they were pups pointing tweety birds and butterflys...once they learned the real target, they quit pointing those critters that were a waste of time. They did that on their own with time afield.

    I moved up from Montana and my dogs had no trouble pointing spruce and ruffed grouse or ptarmigan. Like byrd_hntr, I was amazed at my Britt's ability to point grouse in roosts 20+ feet up a tree.
    As Jim says, they might take a little time to adjust their hunting range and which objectives to search. The other thing that can be different between species is the tendency to hold tight or run when pointed.
    The ptarmigan cover allows for the dogs to range similar to huns/sharptails in Montana, but my dogs needed to shorten up in the grouse woods. My Weimaraner (Buck) had a more difficult time with that than my Britt (Pie). I do not know if that had anything to do with age (Weim was older), gender, breed or genetics.

  8. #8

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    Thanks for the replies guys. I guess how I wrote it was a bit misleading, those were just examples, I don't have a dog yet. I have wanted a bird dog for a very long time, but my job keeps me moving around a lot so I have been putting it off.

    Well, time to settle down is in the not to distant future, and I have been thinking about it more and more. I started thinking maybe I don't really have to wait the entire time. If I didn't wait, it would mean the dog would be trained on different birds then it would be hunting down the road.

    Either way, it's still a little ways off. I don't really know much about dogs, let alone training one so I got to do a whole lot of researching to do first. I have always loved upland bird hunting, and I can usually do fairly well without a dog, but it just seems like it would be more fun with a dog.

    Besides, I am tired of picking feathers out of my mouth after retieving the birds.

    Thanks,

    Ryan
    "If you are not working to protect hunting, then you are working to destroy it." ......Fred Bear

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    Member alaskabushrat's Avatar
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    Default Bird dog

    Hell, my four year old Siberian chases all kinds of birds out of the brush and he hasn't had any training.
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    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim McCann View Post
    Byrd_hntr,

    I don't believe I've had the pleasure of meeting you, but if you have GSPs I need to tell you of a call I got the other day. Military person needs to get his 8 month old pup to a new home. He's asking $900, paid $1,000. Sounds like a nice dog, but I've got a kennel full of Brittanys and I can't take another dog, at least not at the moment. Know of anyone who might be interested?

    Jim
    Ill ask around but I just started a Griff so Im a bit busy right now myself. There's a few GSP lovers around you might try making a general post as see if you get any hits.
    I'm going to ctrl-alt-delete you so hard your mama's computer is going to reboot.

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    Member slimm's Avatar
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    ... when it comes to hunting dogs? This might be a dumb question, but can you take a dog that has hunted nothing but quail or chuckar and put them on grouse and have them perform with the same results? ....
    Yes no doubt about it,,And never skip a beat.

    Most areas i hunt its routine to get Chukars up, then minutes later it would be Huns,Quail,
    Sage hen,Sharpies..
    Check out the trophy ears on that critter in the first pic..
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    Nice looking dog, Slimm!

    Jim

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    Member slimm's Avatar
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    Thanks Jim i appreciate that..
    She is 9 years old and has well over 500 hunts behind her..
    No pleasure is greater for me than to just put her nose to the wind and watch her do her thing..

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    Interesting a rabbit pointer! Sweet looking dog for sure!

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    Default Bird are birds but ....

    At a hunt test in Florida the judges decided to throw quail, yes quail. All the good old boys had a fit. I think everyone thought I was new at this and my 80 lb lanky lab had never even hunted quail. We took a stroll by the bird box and I "helped" bag the dead birds letting Gunner take a sniff, hold it and then fetch it off the ground. The wait was nerve wracking as one by one the dogs failed in one way or another, blinking or swallowing the bird with the handler having go half way down the dog's throad to pull them out by their little feet. If we couldn't do it, the test was scratched.
    Our turn, sit, mark it, shot and throw as a beam of sun light lit the fall. What luck. Gunner ran down the hill, pinned it, picked it up and delivered like he was holding an egg.

    Spruce hens are so animated it shouldn't be a problem and Lucy also learned to look up and "point" trees. They don't always have a bird in them though and she always picks a spruce tree. Honestly, they are easy to shoot and find perched in a tree they drop at our feet. The only reason we take her is for her benefit but she has been handy at chasing down a wounded bird adn digging them out when they hide in some brush or down trees.

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