Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Thoughts on Dynafit Systems

  1. #1
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kenai, Ak
    Posts
    395

    Default Thoughts on Dynafit Systems

    Just curious if anyone has any thoughts. I haven't done any backcountry skiing in more than a decade, but got back on the boards at Alyeska last winter and several times so far this year and I'm now starting to consider it again. (The powder jones rears its' ugly head!) but I desperately need new boots. Is it worth considering the dynafit or similar system and buying compatible skis/bindings in the future, or am I better off just buying some comfortable downhill boots and using them for the few bc trips I'm likely to take in a season?

    I see Scarpa and some other brands actually have stiffnes adjustments for walking/hiking and skiing. Do they really work? I haven't made the trip to town to try-on boots yet, so I'll probably learn more from a sales person then, but I'm one who likes to do some online research before I go-in to make a purchase.

    I still have the old Pieps and shovel (there's another question; the pieps is the 457 frequency, but no digital readout like the newer ones; do the newer ones have a wider search range or anything?)

    One more question...anyone care to recommend a shop or two in Girdwood or Anchorage that would be knowledgeable without being too pushy. I'm likely to try on a few pairs and maybe even demo some, if possible, before I make my final decision.

    Thanks for the help.

  2. #2
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Squarebanks
    Posts
    661

    Thumbs up dynafit

    I got a chance to use the dynafit system a few times last winter and once this winter early for some back country work skiing in the Wrangells. I am by no means an expert at free heel or alpine for that matter. But the system works pretty well. I was able to skin without too much trouble and putting on crampons was easy. The heel lock system helped with walking but it was by no means like stepping into a mountaineering boot. Pointing the skis downhill was easy as pie and was really enjoyable. For the amount of skiing I do I doubt I will ever pull the trigger on a pair of 700 dollar boots but the design is sound and you can usually pick up a pair of Scarpas or Garmonts in the off season for around 300. Watch steepandcheap.com they have deals once in a while. I demoed a pair a few years ago at World Cups Sports in Girdwood and those guys were knowledgeable without being pushy and got me set up. Good luck!
    I'm going to ctrl-alt-delete you so hard your mama's computer is going to reboot.

  3. #3
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,393

    Default

    Unless you are going to be in the backcounty almost 100% of the time, I wouldn't go with dynafit as your main system. A better choice would be Fritschi or Naxo bindings. They're great for the backcountry, but also stout enough for resort skiing. Better yet, you don't have to buy special boots for them. I would go with a backcountry-specific boot, though. I absolutely LOVE my Garmont Adrenalins - they're far lighter and thus more enjoyable in the backcountry, but they're stiff enough to be ridden pretty aggressively at the resort. Check out a variety fo Garmonts and Scarpas to see what fits your foot best.

    Agreed with the recommendation of World Cup in Girdwood. AMH in Anchorage has some options as well. REI might be worth a look for sale prices near the end of the season, but their staff usually isn't as knowledgable.

    And...just in case you have small feet...I'm selling a pair of Garmont Adrenalins in size 26.5. After some mild frostbite, I've decided that I finally need a bit larger boot. I bought the same boot in a 27 and now need to drop my previous (lightly used) pair.

  4. #4
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kenai, Ak
    Posts
    395

    Default

    Will the backcountry specific boots by Garmont and Scarpa fit the integrated bindings on my rossi bandit b83s?

    I wish I did have small feet. I think I'll need at least a 28.5. I need to get fitted to find-out for sure, but I wear an 11 in street shoes. Bummer.

  5. #5

    Default

    I feel that the Dynafit system is worth it, all my skis and my wife's skis have dynafit bindings on them, we use them everywhere including Alyeska... I've been skiing for the better part of 25 years and using dynafits for the last 10 almost exclusively, I'm not a hard charging skier by today's standards but agressive... I guess it also depends on how much you'll be skiing at a resort.

    I ski more in the backcountry then at the resort and the weight savings to me are absolutely worth it, the stride you have while in touring mode is almost like a natural walking stride compared to something like a Fritschi or Naxo binding. The light weight also allows me to have a bigger ski for the powder without too much extra weight.

    Backcountry boots will not work in regular alpine bindings, the rubber sole does not allow them to fit into the binding along with not allowing them to release properly, but there are several models that come with both alpine and backcountry touring soles.

    If I were looking for new boots, buy a pair with the Dynafit inserts, why limit youself to non-dynafit bindings when both types of boots are roughly the same price?

    My $.02

  6. #6
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kenai, Ak
    Posts
    395

    Default Another option?

    How about these or similar randonee adapters for alpine bindings? If I'm only planning to make a few backcountry trips a year, I probably don't want to spend a grand or more on gear. The Dynafit boots don't sound like they would hurt, in case I want to upgrade in the future, but for now...

    http://www.rei.com/product/715585

  7. #7
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,393

    Default

    The trekkers work well for what they are. They'll definitely allow you to do some backcountry skiing, but you'll be working a lot harder since you'll be carrying heavier boots and much heavier bindings up the mountain. Not a deal breaker, but you'll likely be done after a run - maybe two. For an inexpensive way to get into backcountry skiing, buying a pair of trekkers and some skins is a pretty good way to go.

  8. #8

    Default

    I agree, trekkers arent the best, but a good way to get into the backcountry for cheap...

  9. #9
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kenai, Ak
    Posts
    395

    Default Thanks

    Thanks for the input guys. The small amount of backcountry experience I've had was hiking pre-season in and around the ski area in MT. We just suffered through the hike to the ridge to get a few turns in before the area opened. My skis were ridiculously heavy and the boots killed me every time, but it was still worth it. I'd like to get into a little more up here, but I'll probably start slow (and as cheap as possible to see if I'm really still willing to put-out the effort).

    Sounds like I should definitely still look into a good backcountry boot to start with, and at least I'll be that far ahead if I do decide to really go for it.


    So what about my old Pieps? It worked fine in the mid 90's and the frequency's still the same...Would you guys feel safe skiing with a partner with one of these older models? We practiced with them quite a bit back in the day, so I'm sure with a few refresher exercises I'd be competent with it.

  10. #10
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Searching for more cowbell!
    Posts
    1,945

    Default

    I wanted to throw in a good word for World Cup in Girdwood. Talk to Corey about fishing first, then skiing. The older folks don't work with you much but Corey is the MAN!

    For beacons, I've played with most of the beacons out and I'm hooked on the Pulse Barryvox. The Pieps DSP has similar range but the Pulse works better for me.

    I'm a big fan of buying local but it's a hard sell with boots. Typically, you can find last year's boot online for half the price of this year's boot. It's tough to spend an extra $350-400 to support local business.


    As for feeling safe, I'd rather ski with an older (still functional) beacon and someone who knows and understands it functions and use than someone with 10 new DSP's that can't find me I would prefer you to have the extra range. Beacons are a lot like back up gear in diving. Transmitting saves your arse. Receiving saves your buddy's arse. Ability to receive the best signal from as far away is possible is a little extra handshake of friendship if the white room turns black.
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  11. #11
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kenai, Ak
    Posts
    395

    Default Online

    Yeah, I've been looking online and I've found some screamin deals. I just hate to use a local shop to fit me for the boots and then buy the boots online. I'm thinking I might demo a couple of pair; then at least if I find a deal on a comparable boot online, the shop still makes a few bucks on the rental...We'll see, it's always nice to have the shop back-up the purchase, thermal fit the boots, and help with the decision making process. Is all this worth 3-400 bucks? Hmmm...We'll have to see.

  12. #12
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Searching for more cowbell!
    Posts
    1,945

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottsum View Post
    I just hate to use a local shop to fit me for the boots and then buy the boots online.
    What I love about Girdwood is the functionality of Beer Rules!

    Beer Rules are simple. Be completely honest with Corey. Tell him that you want to try some boots because you want to get back into skiing but you can't justify spending the $300-400 extra for the green boot over the blue with green stripes boot. Ask what his favorite beer is, then bring him a 12 pack after you have satisfactorily found a boot that feels right.

    Then, the local vibe is happy. You are content because you were honest up front and paid a small fee for the services provided. Corey is happy because he met a cool dude and enjoyed a tasty beverage. Due to the quality of service you received, you will be more likely to be a repeat customer for accessories (maybe even a pair of skis or some bindings), so the store is happy.

    All is happy and honest in the world.

    Beer rules are a beautiful thing!!
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  13. #13
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kenai, Ak
    Posts
    395

    Default Beer Rules!

    I like your logic. It's amazing how beer can fix anything. It's like bandaids for kids. It makes everything feel better and makes friends in the process. I'll have to go see Corey this weekend while I'm up there.

  14. #14
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,393

    Default

    Yeah, we did all kinds of work on beer when I worked at a local ski shop. How long to get your skis tuned? 3-4 days, on average. How long if you show up at closing time with a six pack of quality beer? 15 minutes. Even though I don't work there any longer, I still get my work done for "free" if I stop by at closing time.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •