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Thread: Snowmachine camping (siwash style)

  1. #1
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Snowmachine camping (siwash style)

    Maybe this should be in the camping forum...
    Anyway, what do you pack for an overnight camping trip (not cabin), and what do you pack it into?

    I no longer pack a tent, as they mostly just frost up inside (I used to when I had a small wall tent and stove). Now it's just a tarp and a bunch of disposable line. I try to pack light and concentrate on having a good bed and good food. I usually tow two sleds- both plastic toboggan types- in tandem. Food tote, a pot and frying pan, small chainsaw and ax, 2 gal. can of straight gas and a bottle of oil, wire cooking grate, small butane lantern, personal bag of "possibles" including a survival kit... no doubt a bunch of other things I'm forgetting right now. I have a list somewhere.

    Whoever I go with packs their own gear in their own sled, except we divvy up food and cooking gear so we don't duplicate. Generally only need for one ax and chainsaw. An auger is mandatory if I go to fish somewhere.

    While I like cabins and the comfort they afford, I feel more in touch with the real Alaska and the old timers when I siwash it. Getting a little tougher to do as I grow older and stiffer!

  2. #2

    Thumbs up

    I don't do it often as I should, and more often than not it is unplanned. On those occasions, things are pretty spartan and usually just a bed of spruce boughs under a tight spruce tree and a campfire. I make coffee and eat candy and moose on a stick for dinner and coffee and moose on a stick for breakfast before heading on. I always have a coffee pot, cup and coffee loaded in my packs no matter where I go.

    With the trips that are planned, I take a chainsaw, axe, first aid kit, Coffee pot, cooking pot for boiling food in and a tarp for shelter. Again the bed of spruce boughs is the ticket, except if I know I am going for two or three days, I'll add in a sleeping bag and slip a pad in as well. I think campfires are heap good medicine, so I always make one. I use black plastic sleds behind the snowmachine and pack everything into canvas bags before they go in the sled. Usually if I plan one, it is to go fishing or hunting, so I will have what fishing and hunting gear I need, along as well.
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  3. #3
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Spruce boughs and fire

    Quote Originally Posted by Akres View Post
    I don't do it often as I should, and more often than not it is unplanned. On those occasions, things are pretty spartan and usually just a bed of spruce boughs under a tight spruce tree and a campfire. I make coffee and eat candy and moose on a stick for dinner and coffee and moose on a stick for breakfast before heading on. I always have a coffee pot, cup and coffee loaded in my packs no matter where I go.

    With the trips that are planned, I take a chainsaw, axe, first aid kit, Coffee pot, cooking pot for boiling food in and a tarp for shelter. Again the bed of spruce boughs is the ticket, except if I know I am going for two or three days, I'll add in a sleeping bag and slip a pad in as well. I think campfires are heap good medicine, so I always make one. I use black plastic sleds behind the snowmachine and pack everything into canvas bags before they go in the sled. Usually if I plan one, it is to go fishing or hunting, so I will have what fishing and hunting gear I need, along as well.
    Layering the floor of your lean-to or other shelter is imperative to a reasonably warm sleeping situation. I wish spruce boughs worked as well as pine, but the truth is that even if you layer them properly, you'll still likely get a poker to plague you. Enough boughs will put you off the snow, and with a pad will make the night bearable.

    Agreed: fire is "good medicine". I'd rather spend a lot of time cutting and gathering wood and chopping kindling than doing other activities because it gets dark so soon and I can cook in the dark if need be. A small chainsaw is now a necessity in my book. I try to make a reflective fire on top of green log floaters so it doesn't sink down so fast. Also, I now carry with me a tryptic panel made of wide flashing and hinges to reflect heat back at me.

    I like your idea of packing gear in canvas bags, though I have generally used totes. But totes don't conform as well in a sled as soft-side bags do. That used to not be much problem when I built large, high sided plywood "sleighs" out in the bush, but for low plastic toboggans (generally) room is at a premium.

  4. #4

    Default

    I have wanted to start with a Otter Sled/Combo Icefishing house. and build a mobile camp for spring bear. Have 2" Blue board glued to 5/8" plywood for a removeable bed base. I have a 09' SWT to use as a tractor. If anyone wants to brainstorm this I can find the original thread from last year on the Ski-Doo Travel trailer.

  5. #5
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default next weekend

    thinking of taking the tipi and stove out for an overnight fishing trip....have to get the gear out and sorted.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Have 2" Blue board glued to 5/8" plywood for a removeable bed base.


    Why do you want it to be so big and heavy?

  7. #7

    Default Arctic Oven

    Not uncommon to drag this 66 lbs tent, my gear of 80 lbs, & 365 lbs gls of gas anywhere I want to go. I love Alaska!
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  8. #8

    Default The Otter sled

    STOP please! Wasting money with this Otter Sled! I looked into becomming a dealer and the weak part is the hitch towing from the front and the plastic compound. Tow from the sides always. The Siglin system is the way to go. Yes these slieghs are from the front but, if you truly want a smooth ride LOOK at his taboggens,

    http://www.northernsledworks.com/Nor...ks-Prices.html

    This man does awsome work! Unless you see/build one for your self you'll see. The Otters may fail you on something around -10 and a small tree stump! We had two of them blow out on the job. My Siiglin has been on the Y.Q. from Fairbanks to Whitehorsce and back plus anoher 2,000 miles on the side! You decide?? Buy cheap know, be on you own Quest later!

    Eric

  9. #9
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    I have a good number of miles on the otter sled, in fact I have 2 of them. I have not found any issue w/ the molded tow points. I do know that they suffer in extreme cold. I shattered the back out of the first one I owned. I learnd the hard way not to but the gas in the back of the sled on long cold trips! Now I pack the heavy stuff in the middle and line the outside w/ things like the tent or other "soft" gear. I do agree that there are better sleds available but they also cost a great deal more. I do plan on getting the hyfax runner kit for mine one of these days to help it track better on offcamber packed trails.

  10. #10
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    Default

    What snowmobile are you useing??

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