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Thread: getting started in alaska

  1. #1
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    Default getting started in alaska

    I currently live in Colorado working as a home builder in the summer and hunting/fishing guide in the fall. I have always dreamed of taking to the sky, but not necessarily with the big carriers...not my style. My wife and I have been seriously considering a career change for me and piloting is on the top of my list. I have been looking into what it's going to take to become an alaskan bush pilot and I've become extremely excited. I do have some questions that maybe someone could help me with. After my private pilot license what is the best way to acquire hours for my commercial...250total I guess. Then after the commercial is complete along with float certification what is the best way to accumulate?

  2. #2

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    The best way to build hours is buy and own a aircraft, or be filthy rich and rent one.

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    Default maybe owning a plane is better.

    I guess if you figure the hourly rental costs of a plane it might be a good route to buy a plane. What do planes go for....figuring the cheapest way possible?

  4. #4

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    First I would get a little flight time. Make sure it is something you can mentally handle. I went to college that also had an ag aviation program. There were alot of wanna be ag pilots. Many of them are not ag pilots today or even pilots. Some are. A few are great pilots.

    Acquiring hours for commercial. There is more to it than just acquiring x hours. Most of it is practicing certain skills both dual and solo. The more committed you are and the shorter the calender time frame from start to check ride the less it will cost you.

    There really is no cheap way to do anything in aviation. Get a few solo hours then if you have the ability to buy a plane go for it. I don't think it will be any cheaper, maybe more expensive, but you will gain experience and confidence in your plane.

  5. #5
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jmk36 View Post
    I guess if you figure the hourly rental costs of a plane it might be a good route to buy a plane. What do planes go for....figuring the cheapest way possible?
    even old planes cost as much as a modest house in a good economy.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Actually, for between 15-$25,000 you can get a Taylorcraft, an Aeronca Champ or Chief or a Cessna 140 or 150. Not the highest performing of airplanes, but perfectly good for building time, not to mention a whole lot of fun.....Louis
    Louis Knapp

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    buy parts, build it yourself while you learn to fly, that way you know your plane inside and out.. annd by the time your done learning, youll have your own plane.

    If you cant stand behind the troops in Iraq.. Feel free to stand in front of them.

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    This looks like a pretty good deal:
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1939-...item2304e4ed51
    Louis Knapp

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    Default aeronca 65c

    Thanks to everyone for their comments. I appreciate your honest opinions. I really like the idea of building my own plane, and I think it would conincide with the a+p mechanics certification I'm thinking of doing as well. I have about three years before I would be able to make the move and it is during this time I would like to acquire the necessary tools and training, starting with my private.

    The aeronca 65c offered on ebay looks like a great deal. It would seem an innexpensive plane as this would be a great way to acquire hours. Again thanks to everyone for their replies, this is my first time talking on a forum of any kind and I love how involved everybody is.

    If I was to build my own plane during my schooling for the a+p mechanics certification what suggestions does anybody have for the ideal "bush" and "float plane, or would they be the same?

    Where else is a good place to look for old planes to fix up and rebuild?

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    Lots of great plans built and kit built aircraft out there, too many to mention in one post. I've thought the Murphy Moose http://www.pattersonaerosales.com/Ai...ose/Moose.html would be a kick. If you want to build a knock off of the venerable Cub, or one of its deratives you might check out Wag-Aero http://www.wagaero.com/ You can either start with a pre welded fuselage or just go with raw materials and a set of plans. Of course the choice depends on how much money you want to lay out to get started and how much time you want to spend (and your welding ability) . Either way, building or restoring an airplane is extremely time consuming. I'm still working on rebuilding my Aeronca Sedan. I took it apart for a "one winter recover job" and that was the fall of 1998!.... Life happens along the way. If you want to get into the air quickly, I can't recommend building or rebuilding a plane over buying one that's airworthy. If you do want to get the experience, however and consider working on planes to be quality time, I recommend it. I've certainly enjoyed the experience, despite the frustrations. An A & P is a really good way to get started in aviation. Owning a plane is a rich man's game if you can't do most of the work on it yourself.

    As far as finding airplanes and rebuild projects, one site I like to browse frequently is Barnstormers: http://www.barnstormers.com/ Then there's also e-bay and Craigs list.

    One really good resource I'd highly recommend if you get into building or restoring an airplane is the EAA: http://www.eaa.org/ You can probably find a chapter in your area where you can pick the brains of other airplane enthusiasts. Hope this helps....Louis
    Louis Knapp

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    Default Grizzly 1

    Quote Originally Posted by jmk36 View Post
    Thanks to everyone for their comments. I appreciate your honest opinions. I really like the idea of building my own plane, and I think it would conincide with the a+p mechanics certification I'm thinking of doing as well. I have about three years before I would be able to make the move and it is during this time I would like to acquire the necessary tools and training, starting with my private.

    The aeronca 65c offered on ebay looks like a great deal. It would seem an innexpensive plane as this would be a great way to acquire hours. Again thanks to everyone for their replies, this is my first time talking on a forum of any kind and I love how involved everybody is.

    If I was to build my own plane during my schooling for the a+p mechanics certification what suggestions does anybody have for the ideal "bush" and "float plane, or would they be the same?

    Where else is a good place to look for old planes to fix up and rebuild?
    Take it from an old salt (almost 20,000 Alaskan hours), see if you can pick up this Aeronca 65-hp Chief. My first airplane (1957) was a Chief, and cost only $1,400 at that time. Yep, less than 2-grand. The Chief has a great wing, which makes it a good, inexpensive flying machine, and easy to handle. With no changes at all, I did a lot of "bush" flying with it. No heavy loads, no really short field landings/takeoffs, but a great little ship to fly and to rack up the hours in. Besides, it's a tail dragger, and you'll need tail dragger time if you're going to fly in Alaska! The 65-hp has no generator, no battery, and hence no starter. It's a hand-propping task each time. But I've always thought every pilot shoue learn that anyway. My own opinion is that trying to build your own plane will be a time consumer, and you MAY still have a problem with certification and airworthiness (passenger flying). Someone else can address that aspect for you.

    Building you own won't be as cheap as you think, what with parts, freight, bits and pieces, and tools/equipment required.

    Best of luck, no matter what you choose!

    Mort

  12. #12
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    Default don't even look at a home built

    Don't even look at a home built unless its already built, been there done that! You are looking at lots of money to complete a plane and be safe and you can't sell them when you want to move to something new, again BTDT. I have three planes right now and they aren't that expensive to buy or own. All are certified A/C and two are worth under $25,000.00 ea. Completely do able if you want to fly . I saw a C 150 sell for 13,000 this winter and it was in fine shape and mid time engine. At that price I wouldn't even buy insurance. Run car gas at 5 GPH ,$ 40.00 P/mo tie down, have fun.

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