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Thread: Canning pressure

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    Member ADUKHNT's Avatar
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    Default Canning pressure

    My grandmother left me two pressure cookers and they have 15 lb regulators. I have only canned using 10 lb regulators as the state calls for while canning smoked salmon. Do I need to very the cooking time? Will it make a big differance using 15 lbs for 110 min vs. 10 lbs at 110 min? Please help.

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    Short answer: Yes, the increased pressure will cause the canner to get hotter. How much I am not sure, this will depend somewhat on altitude.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Question No answer to this one?

    I also recently acquired an old Presto pressure cooker that is about 30 years old. Replaced all the gaskets and gauge so it is good as new. Have run a test (just water, no food) to be sure everything functioned right, which it did. It has a 15-pound weight, but also a gauge.

    The original owner's manual that came with it shows salmon canning should be done at 15psi for 80 minutes. The state's CES info says 11psi for 100 minutes (or a 10psi weight).

    I would tend to think the more recent state info may be a better method over 30 year old manufacturer's info. But, the question is, does it really matter which method is used? Would seem more convenient to use the 15psi method the unit is designed for, though I could try to find a 10psi weight to make the state's method easier to do. I suspect that trying to maintain 11psi by the gauge without the right venting weight could be pretty tricky (using a gas range).
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    I use a large American pressure cooker with a gauge and no controlled venting. Pressure is controlled by heat input. The first half of the cooking cylcle requires constant attention to the heat. As the contents come up to temp I have to reduce heat. Since the rule is that pressure must always exceed 10# I've always used 15# as my target so I have some margin of safety if the pressure drops a little after I reduce heat. I can't tell any difference in the quality of the product whether cooked at 10, 12 or 15+ pounds. I always cook fish for 100 minutes at or above 10#. If I was you? I'd use the 15# weight for 100 minutes and not worry about it.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    JOAT. my canners all have the pop ups not the weights.. on the gas range once the lbs are set on the gauge i let it go an monitor it once in awhile. we have always regulated time and pressure by the guage...

    the 15 lb weight was the safety relief from 30 years ago... now if we go over pressure the seals around the pop ups go and let it vent.

    if i understand canning correctly you can adjust the time/temp ratio SOME for increased pressure/temp and shorter time durations but do not know the exact scale...

    the reason for 10 lbs @110 or 11 lbs @100 min is to get the liquid mass up above ~260 degrees to kill the BOTZ. and other bacterias that could be in it.

    15 lbs would put your food well over 300 degrees and the over all cooking time would have to be modified to some extent to prevent over cooking but still allow enough time to thoroughly kill all the bacterias
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    FYI, 15# of pressure equals 250*f. 10# of pressure equals 240*f. I'll stand by my earlier recommendation. Cook half of the same fish at both temps and you will not be able to recognize a difference.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    My gauge shows the same (10=240 & 15=250). Is it recommended then to increase the time from 80 minutes to 100 minutes using 15psi? I wonder where the 100 minutes came from as it appears to be a mixing of numbers between the state and the manufacturer.

    If going from 10psi at 110 minutes to 11psi at 100 minutes is correct, then the math says that 80 minutes at 15psi is more than long enough. The important aspect is getting internal temperature high enough for long enough to kill any bacteria. I would think the manufacturer's info must have worked just fine 30 years ago as they had the same fish and the same bacteria to contend with.
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    Let us know if you get sick!

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    So, I just downloaded the most recent version of the owner's manual from the Presto website. And it agrees with the state at 11psi for 100 minutes. Thus, that will be my target, though I'm not going to worry about going over 11psi.

    http://www.gopresto.com/products/manuals.php
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    80 minutes at 15psi (usually aim for 15 1/2 but stay under 16) is what we do for salmon. it works well.

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    I would talk to the Alaska Extension Service, about what you should do. They can also test your regulator to make sure it is working correctly.

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    The U of A Cooperative Extension Service isn't on-line, but this one is. At least it provides an objective reference.

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/distrib...on/DJ1087.html

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    Thanks for the link.

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