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Thread: Is it time to change the "barbed" arrow regulation?

  1. #1
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default Is it time to change the "barbed" arrow regulation?

    I am getting into bow hunting this year but I have followed along w/ the regulations as I do most hunting related issues. I see many new technologies on the broadhead market that would not "fly" with our limited requirements. I believe that I understand the intent was to prevent folks from hunting with bowfishing type arrows but it seems to me with passthroughs on moose sized game fairly routine now days that there is little use in the regulation. I find it hard to believe that the an animal is any more likely to survive a well placed hit from a montec G5 vs a rage slipcam yet one is legal and the other is not.

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    Member ArcherFig's Avatar
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    I agree with you, but I believe the intent of the regulation is based on someone making a bad shot, the arrow might have better chance of coming out, how? I don't know. In most cases the arrow will pass through, or will break once they take off. It should probably be looked at again. Just my 2 pennies...

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    Member Mort's Avatar
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    I assume you refer to the Rage as illegal. That is incorrect, because the blades are not "fixed" when deployed. They actually fold forward when you apply pressure from the aft side (shaft). Very easy to pull out of a target, I assume equally easy for the shaft to back out when no pass-through accomplished.

    From regs: (emphasis mine)

    "Barbed" means an arrowhead with any fixed portion of the rear edge of the arrowhead formaing an angle less than 90 degrees with the shaft when measured from the nock end of the arrow;

    "Mechanical or retractable broadhead" means a broadhead with cutting edges that are retracted during flight and open upon impact to a minimum cutting diameter of not less than seven-eighths inch (7/8") and does not lock open after impact to create fixed barbs;

    I had also thought it was a barbed head, but a visit to Raspberry/C had them proving it was a legal head. Not "fixed." Cool!

    Chris

  4. #4

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    I think you'll be sorely dissappointed at how many people DONT get pass throughs! If I had to bet, I'd guess less then 50% get them on DEER sized game.

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    Member ArcherFig's Avatar
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    As far as how many pass' actually happen I would say it depends on a lot of different factors, either way I have not looked at the regulations for a while but I thought any type of mechanical was not allowed for moose? Incorrect?

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Remember

    Remember that most of us can achieve a pass through. BUT, younger hunters and women shooting the minimal poundage allowable by law may not.

    The barbed rule needs to stay. Mechanicals are a different argument all together.

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Here is the simple version of what I've been trying to formulate as my response to this. The barbless rule needs to stay.

    1) To prevent back lash against bowhunters in general. Look at the response to the moose with a arrow in the butt down by anchorage several years ago. That moose on the news every night is exactly why there is no bow hunting in the anchorage bowl, shotgun and black powder hunts yes archery no. A barbless broadhead is much more likely to come out.

    2) Barbs are unnecessary and maybe harmful to game. A wounded animal is far more likely to heal well if the arrow is removed or falls out. Barbed arrows will stay put even if rubbed against trees and brush. Barbless can be rubbed out or pushed out by infectious process. ie swelling/puss, like a splinter, ya that's a major splinter! Besides they serve no real purpose and have been shown to decrees penetration. Why change a good reg for the sake of inferior equipment.
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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Inferior shots

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick P View Post
    Why change a good reg for the sake of inferior equipment.
    You might say; "Inferior shooting". ; )

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    Member ArcherFig's Avatar
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    I believe the reg is there for both, equipment and newer shooters. Regardless, technology is an amazing thing, maybe with all this "eco" movement dissolvable broad heads will get invented. How I plan on making my millions....

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    I'd love a broad head that disintegrates for ducks!!!! Let me know when you get a prototype working.
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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Interesting view point on the rage. While the blade doesn't lock and isn't technically fixed it still maintains a "barb" based on the angle lest than 90* rule in all of it's configurations from closed to open.



    I guess there are enough "legal" and effective broadheads around to not worry about modifying the law, it just seems strange to me the sheer number of heads available for sale at the local stores that are illegal. It kind of seems silly to outlaw heads that are proven to cleanly take game due to the shape of the non-cutting side of the blade.

  12. #12

    Default just curious....

    Anyone aware of any "barbed" fixed blade broadheads on the market these days? Just a quick glance through Cabelas online and I didn't see any. Only one I can ever remember (not that I've looked at tons) was the Hoyt Chuck-its that were produced back in the late 80s or so. Here's one pictured below, clearly those fixed blades form a barb. I don't think they lasted long on the market as I'm guessing they were not legal in most states.

    I've archery hunted in three different states over my life and all of those states had the same regulation: no barbed broadheads. I think the intent of the law was aimed at fixed blade broadheads like the one pictured. I know that regulation was on the books in two of the states I've hunted long before mechanical broadheads were being marketed. I'm guessing the manufacturers these days are smart enough to not produce a mechanical broadhead whose blades lock into a fixed, barbed position upon opening.

    Jeff
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    Member ArcherFig's Avatar
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    Well, I could be mistaken, however what I was told and it could be a rumor, its considered barbed if its a 90 degree angle or more. If someone knows for sure that would be awesome to clear up, Thanks...

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Diagram

    http://www.dec.ny.gov/images/wildlif...es/broadhd.gif

    This is the chart commonly used in most IBEP or archery certification programs. It is considered the standard reference.

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    Member ArcherFig's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot!
    Last edited by ArcherFig; 01-13-2010 at 23:11. Reason: .

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    Member AK145's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Interesting view point on the rage. While the blade doesn't lock and isn't technically fixed it still maintains a "barb" based on the angle lest than 90* rule in all of it's configurations from closed to open.



    I guess there are enough "legal" and effective broadheads around to not worry about modifying the law, it just seems strange to me the sheer number of heads available for sale at the local stores that are illegal. It kind of seems silly to outlaw heads that are proven to cleanly take game due to the shape of the non-cutting side of the blade.
    I still respectively disagree...there is no portion on the rage that is ever "fixed" at less than 90 degrees. The reg states any "fixed" portion...that is a loop hole for the Rage, G5 Stiker and other rear deploying fixed blade heads.

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