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Thread: Annealing Options

  1. #1
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    Default Annealing Options

    I have several hundred cases that I would like to squeek some more use out of. I would like some advice on the cheapest, easiest, and fastest way to do this. I don't want to spend any money, unless annealing is too time consuming, then I would forget about it, and just buy some new brass. Here are the tools that I have at my disposal; Victor oxy propane torch set up, benz-o-matic, wood stove, and a weed burner. Also need to know if I would need to douse them in water, or let them air cool. And if I need to heat the entire case or just the neck and shoulder. Thank You For Your Time

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    Hold each case by the head in your hand and hit the top third of the case with the flame from the torch. When the case becomes to hot to hold toss it into a bucket of water.
    Tennessee

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    Annealing is a complex issue. I have done it in the past as follows:

    Stand cases in a pan of water, up to shoulder
    Turn off lights
    Hit neck with torch, when neck turns red, pull torch away and knock case into water with chopstick.
    Keep shoulders hunched for when wife smacks back of head for using chopstick

    I think annealing is a waste of time except in special situations. I do anneal 7.62 nagant brass though, since the case is worked far beyond that which is normal

  4. #4

    Default What WildAK said

    If brass is old (OLD) then I discard them. If I make a wildcat cartridge that requires resizing and reshaping, then I anneal once. You don't mention what brass you are talking about, how many times they are used, etc. There are other variables to consider that annealing might not address.

  5. #5

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    I use approximately the same methods described here, either holding or starting in a pan, depending on how lazy I am and how many cases I have to do.

    BUT!

    Probably the best write-up I've ever seen on annealing was done by Murphy here on the site. He got pretty specific and talked some science too, if I recall. It was a year or so ago. Wander back through the archives and see if it's still posted. You'll be glad you did.

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    Default ?

    Would be for 22 250 and 243..I rarely load to max...Cases are not stretched beyond specs, or showing any sign of failure. Should I assume, in general, since they don't need trimming, that they don't need annealing? Cases have been loaded at most 5-6 times. These would be for plinking only. THNX

  7. #7
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default annealing cases


  8. #8

    Default I don't think

    that those calibers, if loaded below max would need annealing. I am surprised, even if you only neck-size that after 5-6 firings a bit of trimming isn't needed, but there you go.

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    Default Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by shphtr View Post
    Thanks, that answers my question, way to much of a hassle for my level of experience. Will squeek one more loading out of this batch, then pony up for some new brass. Thanks for your time....

  10. #10
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shphtr View Post

    Do not even attempt to anneal cases until you have a full and complete understanding of this process and the dangers of not annealing only the necks. I like the explanation given on 6mmBR.com. I also like the explanation given in "designing and forming Custom Cartridge" By Ken Howell. This is the best and most practical text I have seen on this subject.

    http://www.6mmbr.com/annealing.html


    Anyone that does any wildcatting needs to know the how to of annealing.



    Ken Howell and I had many discussion on this subject before he finalized the text for publishing this text and I proof read this. Some of the things he put into print have changed as to getting what you need. The Tempalaque is more updated on the 6 BR.com link.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  11. #11
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    "http://www.6mmbr.com/annealing.html"

    Great article...a bit long...but still packed with good info, thanx for the update!

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    I anneal everything but the .308 Winnie. Brass is too expensive in my case, as most of mine are esoteric chamberings.

    I made a little turntable out of a cassette deck to spin the brass while I hold the Bern-zo-matic. Works perfectly.
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    Sorry to but in but, I'm new to reloading and have only been at it off and on two years. I had metalurgy and machine tool in college 20 years. I'm curious about how you can aneal any metal with out a controlled heat source, and specific temperature readings. After the molecular structure of the brass has been changed by stretching and heat from the burning gun powder can it be safe to anneal them. There is no way of knowing about impurities being introduced or the molecular realignment of the brass. Sorry but, a lot of you guys have a lot more knowledge on this and its the first time I heard of it.

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    Default

    Don't over think this. All we're trying to do here is soften the neck of the case so it won't crack on reloading it for the ??? time. Sizing a case down and then expanding the neck back out work hardens the brass. Temperature control is some what important to keep from over softening the neck and loosing neck tension. Many people use temp sticks on the neck and heat till it melts and then quench. Helps keep temps even if the case is turned while doing this. Minor impurities in the brass aren't going to make any difference in this case. Only the neck and maybe some of the shoulder should be annealed. I use a lead pot with temp control and thermometer to heat lead to about 700degrees F. Dip the neck in the lead for a certain time and drop in water. Simple accurate fast and it works.

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