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Thread: 1911 vs. Glock

  1. #1

    Default 1911 vs. Glock

    I have been reading about both of these pistols, no specific manufacturer's though. I am thinking of buying a personal protection piece that is easily concealed and easily carried. I do not want to scare the bejesus out of people with a cocked handgun on the hip.

    1911:
    I love the look of this style handgun, certain manufacturer's make compact 1911's too. I have fired a 1911 45ACP in the past and it was quite comfortable to shoot and they seem to be built very well. On the other hand, call me a puss or paranoid, but carrying a cocked and locked 1911 scares me half to death especially when I have always carried revolvers. I know the chances of one of these pistols accidentally discharging on their own is slim to none, but that still does not reassure me. It would take awhile to get used to a cocked and loaded handgun. I suppose there does not always need to be a round in the chamber, ever heard of condition three?

    Glock:
    Small, lightweight, affordable, and easy to carry. I do not like how glocks have a lot of plastic parts. Some have do not have an external safety, but have the pre-trigger saftey on the trigger itself. I have fired a Glock (forgot the model) in 40 and 357 sig. Not real comfortable in the hands, but easy to shoot. Kaboom, anyone?

    With this in mind I am leaning towards a compact 1911, maybe a baretta 9mm. I would love to own a 1911 45 ACP but my wife owns a 9mm so it might be beneficial to both own a handgun that uses the same cartridge? With this in mind which pistol would you guys recommend and which manufacturer? Also a comfortable shoulder holster recomendation would be great. Ultimately I want a small semi automatic pistol that is small, easily concealed, and something that I can put a lot of rounds through at the range. Are either made in a left handed model?

  2. #2
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    Default Too Each his own

    I'm sure there are those far more knowledgeable than I.... Hopefully they will chime in...

    I shoot a glock 21 for two primary reasons.

    First, it's what is provided for me...
    Second, (and most importantly) I have fired 10's of thousands of rounds through it in as many situations as you can imagine. So my training, confidence and ability is directly linked to this gun.

    I have little doubt that the reason technology from the early 1900's is still around is because of it's enduring abilities...

    Below is an interesting read that I came across...

    http://www.sightm1911.com/lib/other/Glock_vs_1911.htm

  3. #3
    Member AKRoadkill's Avatar
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    Default

    How 'bout a Kahr K40?

  4. #4
    Charterboat Operator kodiakcombo's Avatar
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    Default

    Like winmag, you use what you have and are trained with, then if time and budget allows, get to know other weapons. Once you are familar with whatever one you like and are more comfortble with, thats the one you carry for protection. I find myself going for the thumb safety on my glock, thats from 4 years as an MP with a .45 1911, it just shows that you should use what is ingrained into you. I up graded from a .45 to 50AE but have the same action, a bit of over kill but when you have bears here and possible drive bys in Anc you can return fire thru truck doors.

  5. #5

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    I suppose another conversation would be which is better for personal protection? 9mm, 40 S&W, or 45 ACP. Some have told me a 9mm is too small for the two legged predator but I can tell you I sure wouldnt like to be shot by one. Also I have heard the 9mm's higher velocity bullet will shoot through walls where the 40 and 45 are less lightly to come the other side. Of course the solid material in walls is spaced apart. 9mm will be cheaper to shoot, but, seriously, which is more "ideal?"

  6. #6
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    Default

    Nothing beats a good ole 45 ACP. As Col. Cooper liked to say. It leaves a big entrance wound to let lot's of air in and a big exit wound to let lot's of blood out.


    Para-Ordnance makes the smallest 45 ACP on the market in the Wart Hog. They are also very good quality.

  7. #7

    Default

    Glocks are much over rated in the area of safty. A well tuned and maintained 1911 is one of the safest shooters around. I have found that more people shoot the 1911/ .45ACP well than any other auto that I can think of, for a number of reasons.

    The "Tupper Ware" gun became popular, cuz Glock practically gave them away to money strapped police departments. Sadly at the same time a high percentage of new officers, nowing almost nothing about guns prior to their employment didn't know up from down, so they bought the same stuff for personal carry. The film industry latched onto the "plastic Guns" and now all the "Bad *****" gangsta wannabes have to have 'em too!

    That other pistol (1911) requires too much personal involvement. Besides, ya just can't shoot it worth a hoot "Gangsta style".

    Dan

  8. #8
    Member H. C.'s Avatar
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    Default More a matter of preference

    I have carried both 1911, Glock, Sig Sauer, and other pistols for duty use over the years. I continue to carry a Para Ordnance 1911 now, and a Sig for off duty. After carrying the 1911 for years, and putting thousands of rounds downrange, I have complete faith in the 1911, and am comfortable with the pistol and it's attributes.

    If carrying a pistol cocked and locked makes you uncomfortable, go with the Glock, especially in light of your comment about the revolver. The Glock is universally held to be the easiest semi-automatic pistol for transitioning from a revolver.

    While I do not care for the Glock pistol, but I would never state that they are not good, solid, well made pistols. Do not worry about the "plastic" parts, Glocks have been tested with many 10s of thousands of rounds without a breakage.

    As for the difference between the calibers, this is a debate which has been ongoing for years, and will most likely continue for many more years. First consideration is what are you wanting the firearm for? Simple home protection?

    All three calibers are solid choices in their own right, and are widely accepted as the "cream of the crop" for police duty calibers. However, you will find just as many people who say that the 9mm does not penetrate deeply enough, as those who state that it over penetrates. I carried a 9mm as a duty weapon for a number of years, and I am still comfortable with the round as a man stopper, with the proper ammunition.

    The .40 S&W is simply a 10mm short, developed when the 10mm was literally tearing pistols apart. (Which brings up an interesting point, the Glock pistol also is chambered for the 10mm round. The 10 mm was being fired in pistols that were never developed for the kind of power the 10mm develops, while the Glock 20 was built to handle the 10mm round.)

    The .40 S&W has carved a niche for itself, establishing itself as a serious cartridge which does a great job as an intermediate round, bridging the gap between the 9mm and the .45 acp. The .40 S&W will penetrate every bit as far as the 9mm, and will normally perform better in situations requiring shots through an obstacle, such as a car windowshield.

    And as for the .45 acp, what can you say it has been the top of the heap for years. And as the saying goes, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

    So, as you may have noted, the choice is really yours to make. If I might suggest, see if you can shoot a Glock in each caliber, see what you find comfortable to shoot, where your accuracy is with each round, and if you are married, let your wife try each also. If you are not there and the gun is needed, she may need to use it.

    So Many Guns, So Little Time!

  9. #9
    Member chrisWillh's Avatar
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    Default

    I personaly like the Kimber 1911. All of my friends in law enforcement own onw and it comes highly recomended. Kimbers are a little more spendy then most other 1911's, but well worth it.

  10. #10

    Default

    Kimber is great..

    But I'd say look no further
    http://www.springfield-armory.com/pr...tl-45acp.shtml

    Springfield Armory XD45 ACP - best of all worlds

  11. #11

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    Springfield Armory XD45 ACP - best of all worlds[/quote]


    I'm going to have to 2nd this rec.
    The only downside is that the XD is not made state side.

  12. #12
    Member ysr_racer's Avatar
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    I like Glocks.

    Pull the trigger, it goes bang. Don't pull the trigger, it won't go bang.

    It's that simple.
    brad g.
    So Cal, USA
    Visit my Sporting Clays website
    http://www.ysr-racer.com

  13. #13
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    Default Glock

    I have shot the 1911's and they are great weapons, so I am not badmouthing them in any way. They have been around for lots of years and thats because they are good reliable weapons. I personally prefer the glock. I have a model 23 in .40 S&W. My son was shooting it when he was 9 years old without much trouble. They are light, easy to shoot, easy to field strip, and when you pull the trigger they go bang....every time.

  14. #14

    Default 1911/Glock

    Either the Glock or 1911 are good choices. I think the main thing is learning a good technique and then shooting thousands of rounds. Both require a stiff belt, a secure holster and a good magazine carrier. If you look at the shooting games/sports they are dominated by the 1911 platform. I think there is a reason L.A. Swat, F.B.I. Hostage Rescue and some other govt. special teams carry a pistol based on the 1911. The Isralies and the British Special Air Service carried single action pistols for along time. The Browning Hi Power was their pistol of choice. Leads me to believe that a single action auto in the hands of a competent and highy trained person is the easiest pistol to shoot accurately and quickly. Are they the best for the average person, maybe not. Depends on their committment. I have owned Glocks and they are ok. I will never be without my 1911 and my Hi Power.
    Last edited by .338 mag.; 12-24-2006 at 15:09. Reason: puncuation

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    Default HK USP .40 for me

    I own an HK USP in .40 cal. I love the gun,its never failed me.Its very user friendly, maybe a lil pricey, but I like the dependability of the gun.I took a defensive firearms course a few years back thru my karate instructor,perhaps some people knew him.He's now out of state,his name is Michael Rainey.GREAT INSTRUCTOR...It was a 4 day course,probably 40 hours worth.Day one we fired nearly 700 rounds without cleaning our weapons.My HK nearly even blinked.ANother fella in the course was shooting a Glock,,no problems what so ever..I was very impresssed with both guns,so I went out and bought a Glock 27 ...Great lil gun.But i prefer the handling of my HK.

  16. #16

    Default

    I am glad you mentioned the Springfield Armory XD. Last night I was reading about the XD 3 inch sub compact. I like the safety features, and its only six inches long. I would love to get the rail light for it too. Does anyone have experience with this gun in either 9mil or 40 S&W? I need to get my hands on one of these, I get the feeling it might be too small in my hands.


    [QUOTE=426nut;50124]Springfield Armory XD45 ACP - best of all worlds


    I'm going to have to 2nd this rec.
    The only downside is that the XD is not made state side.

  17. #17

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    Heres a pic


  18. #18
    New member reuben_j_cogburn's Avatar
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    Talking 1911's verses...


    Carrying the 1911's cocked and locked can be intimidating at first but I believe that is mainly due to the advent of all the double action auto's, which use the "cocked and locked" issue to sway sales....
    I don't think anybody gave a hoot until the DA auto's started to become prevalent. Remember back in the good old day's when the P-38, walther and Smith auto where about all there was in a DA auto!!
    In fact most of my DA auto's also allow cocked and locked carry.....
    If you decide on a 1911 style gun go do some research and find out how many people have been shot that way! I don't think you will find many!
    I love my series 70 Colts and my little Auto Ordnance Pit Bull. I also own this fine EAA Wintness in 45ACP. It ain't small but it's a dandy. Feels kinda like a highpower... all steel... 10 round mags.... DA, but can be carried cocked and locked!! This is my present bedside gun
    There are so many choices these day's....
    As for 9mm... I own them too and carry them. It makes sense to simplify the ammo logistics! The 9mm lets you carry more ammo for the weight. It's affordable. I don't feel under gunned with them and I started out a bonfided 9mm hater!!
    Don't rush your search to much! The search can be fun!!! Enjoy it!!!

    Merry Christmas everybody...

    reuben..






  19. #19

    Default

    I personaly can't stand any gun that when dry fired sounds like a **** dart gun! I won't do plastic of any kind. Kinda stuck in my ways I guess.

    As far as 45's go any of the high end 1911's are good if they hit where your looking. My new personal favorite though is a Sig Sauer P220 that has all the wear marks and has been overlooked in my gun vault for a few years. I got the Sig in a horse trade and had my mind made up from the git go that it was just bartering stock and I had no interest in shooting it. I never really gave this gun a chance until recently.

    I made a post on this forum a while back concerning my quest to harvest a deer with a 45ACP. Well, I shot a bunch of different 45's and wasn't really happy with my ability with any of them. I decided the deer would get killed with my HK 40USP. However I had a bunch of 45 ammo left and decided to take the Sig to the range and burn up some ammo. I wasn't long on deciding that the Sig was going deer hunting. I was shooting groups at 30 yards that rivaled what I can do with an L or N frame Smith. I shot 2 consecutive 7 shot groups that would have fit on the end of a beer can at 30 yards. That might not impress everyone out there but its as good as this near sighted old fart can do with anything!

    The deer hunt starts the day after Christmas! Will let you know how it turns out!

  20. #20
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default

    Glocks: I have owned a M-20 (10mm) and M-21 (45 cal), both of which were very accurate and fuctioned without any hic-ups. BUT, the large grip-frame size made them hard for me to instinctivly shoot starting from the holster during timed drills. I would find myself re-adjusting the gun in my hand while coming up on target.
    I also owned an M-22 (40 cal.) where this was not a problem. Later while doing the plain clothes gig I had an issue M-27 (40 cal) that was so small it was not practical to shoot much. The width being wrong for the rest of the gun's size.
    I no longer own any Glocks. Nor do I plan to buy any more. The only one I could see really wishing I had not sold was the 10mm M-20. With full-house bone penetrating loads it was a good gun to carry while out flying.

    1911s: I have owned and carried, a Colt 1911 commercial grade series 70, a Seacamp D.A. converted 45 commander, a 38 Super Commander with a Bar-Sto barrel and a Springfield Armory 1911A1 that I reworked with a Beavertail, Bar-sto barrel, ported slide, Novak sights, and a few other items.
    The 1911s fit my hand better, so I do not have to readjust the gun during a rapid draw from the holster. The angle of the barrel compared to the grip angle is better for me in regards to point shooting.

    It does take a lot of money to make a 1911 shoot as reliably as a Glock with hollow point ammo.
    It also takes more training and practice to be competent with a 1911 style gun.

    I still own one 1911A1, The Springfield that I poured money into.

    Back when I carried everyday for work, both the Glocks and the 1911 were replaced by my old Sig P-220 45. Actually by three Sigs, since I shot them to death before selling them.
    The Sig P-220 had the single stack 45 frame, the right barrel angel for me and the de-cocker DA action made it easy to move from one holster to another, or even throw it into a drawer or booking area locker without getting over involved. The exterior finish was fairly tough and they were all pretty accurate with most types of ammo.

    Plus the Sig, being somewhat like a Glock was reliable out of the box. Going to court with a highly modified gun is asking for trouble.




    I see the rating like this:

    Middle of a serious gun fight, more training:::::Advantage 1911

    Carry around with limited training/cleaning::::Advantage Glock

    Split the difference:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Advantage Sig

    xx

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