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Thread: change trailer bearings from fluid to grease??

  1. #1
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    Default change trailer bearings from fluid to grease??

    the factory trailer that came with my HB freighter had fluid filled hubs.They make me a little nervous on some of the rough gravel rounds that the HB gets towed to.What is involved to change fluid hubs out for hubs that can be packed with grease(bearing buddy's)??

  2. #2
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    Default WTH?

    Grit: Wow. Never heard of an oil lubed hub. Are you sure that the bearings were not dunked and never dried? This is very strange indeed. If you have "normal" tapered roller bearings, I would guess you'd be fine to just remove the bearings, pack them, and stick 'em back in. However, I'd sure call the trailer manufacturer first, and post what you find out; we could all maybe learn something here. Good luck.

  3. #3

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    This is what he is talking about. I don't have them, but have considered installing them on my trailer.
    http://www.tiedown.com/pdf/a751.pdf

  4. #4
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Default

    Those look interesting. I think if I had that set-up already installed, I'd run it until something started to fail (seals for example), and then decide at that point if I wanted to switch to grease.

  5. #5
    Member thelast2's Avatar
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    Default

    No reason why you cant drain the oil and pack with grease. I have seen it done with large equipment trailers. Of course the oil filled ones probably strong enuff to take the abuse as they are used on dump trucks and other industrial equipment.

  6. #6
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    Default very interesting

    Thanks for the link to them. Very interesting. I agree; they look made to run, so why not just keep running them till they break? I see no reason why they'd be any worse than "normal" greased bearings. Thanks for posting; learn something every day. j

  7. #7

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    There is no way I would trade out oil bearings for grease type. For a 3 year run my boat stayed hitched to my truck every day. My boat followed me to work every day..... The oil bath last much longer.

    With the length & nature of your all's winter I dont believe you have much to gain by changing from grease type to oil bearings.

    That said, unless some one knows of an issue with them related to your climate I would leave them be.

  8. #8
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    Default Oil bearings

    RIGHT ON , they run a little more money that is the reason you don't see many on trailers, an the only way some one would change over is cost of replacement on a cup that was broken / leaking an it would be cheeper to change over to the old grees type, an you can see is water gets into the bearing by the color of the oil
    my 2 cts

    SID

  9. #9
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Every single heavy trailer I have is oil bath. Two 45' semi-trailers, one 20 ton equipment trailer. They go years without maintenance. My two lighter duty trailers need grease every season.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  10. #10
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    Default My 2 cents

    I've worked on boats for years, and not seen oil in bearings in place of grease but it make perfect sense.
    Oil would bathe the bearings much better in every way, plus draw the heat away from the shaft to the hub much better than grease.
    Also rolling in cold weater would be much easier too. I might also recomend a synthetic oil that is less suseptable to freezing problems.
    One unusul bit of trivia.
    A trailer that sits most of the time is more vulnerable to problems than one that is being used all the time. Temprature changes and barometric pressures push humidity in to some of the oddest places pushing the grease out and drying out the seal so that emersion on a warm axil just sucks the water right in,the first time you use it after a very long spell.
    Oils tend to soak into the rubber seal better, your stick transmission is a good example. Gear cases on out board are another.

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