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Thread: Best Way To Store Dry Goods

  1. #1
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Default Best Way To Store Dry Goods

    I've grew up always having full freezers, hardy supplies of can goods and keeping veggies like Potatoes, carrots etc for long periods of time but I have never really kept beans or rice and spices. With todays world, I plan on stashing several years supply very soon.

    Has anyone had experience storing it. I know to keep it cool and dry, but how long will it keep (years wise) and is it better to take it out of the bags and put in airtight bins or any other way that you might store it? Also, you garden growers, how long will seed last and best way to store it?

  2. #2
    Member rugersbro's Avatar
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    Default Dry foods.

    Vacuum pack it.
    The better the packer the better it keeps.
    We use a Koch commercial packer.
    Pack all fish, wild game. Geen beans fresh out of the garden
    without blanching.
    Pasta, rice, soup, cooked and fresh pumpkin
    Keeps the critters from living also.

  3. #3
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    I vaccum pack all my fish and meat. I have a small commercial grade sealer. Any experimentation with how long the dry goods will maintain its freshness being vacumm packed.

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    There are many ways to store food supplies. Here is one way that may help someone out.

    The first step to keeping bulk grains fresh is to make sure they are fresh to begin with. When you are buying grains from the bulk bins, ask the store employees how often the bins are filled and if the product gets properly rotated. Look the product over carefully for evidence of insect infestation; this may include live or dead adult moths or larvae, cocoons or sticky webbing that will cause the individual grains to clump together. Do not purchase any bulk grains that are discolored or appear dried out.


    If the store allows it, bring your own container in to fill up from the bulk bins. This will save you the step of transferring it later when you get home and also reduces your consumption of plastic bags. Remember to weigh your container before you fill it so that you don't get charged for the weight of the jar (most stores with bulk bins should have a scale available for this purpose).


    Choose a glass jar with a tight seal to store your grains. Canning jars with metal lids are a good choice and can be gotten fairly inexpensively. There are also specially designed food storage containers with rubber rings around the lid for a tight seal. Be careful reusing old peanut butter or mayonnaise jars. The plastic lids may not seal tightly, allowing for possible spills or insect infestation. To test the seal, screw the lid on an empty jar, and then hold it under water; see if any bubbles escape around the rim of the lid.


    Bulk grains and rice are best stored in a cool dark place, such as a pantry or cabinet. Direct sunlight and high temperatures can cause them to go stale and lose their flavor and nutritional content.


    Storing bulk food in food-grade white plastic buckets with airtight lids is another way to store most dry goods. Flour, sugar, rice, potato flakes, dry beans, soup mixes, powdered eggs, powdered milk, oatmeal, hard winter wheat, pancake mix, salt, noodles and cereals all do well being stored in a cool dry place. Ask for buckets with lids at delis and bakeries; most times they will give them to you free of charge and they are food grade.


    Investing in a dehydrator will allow you to dry out all kinds of fruit snacks such as banana chips and apple chips, which may then be stored in white plastic buckets with airtight lids along with the rest of your bulk food. Dehydrated food can last for years.


    Placing bay leaves into the buckets containing flour and other cereal products will prevent weevils hatching. All cereal products contain insect eggs--it's a fact that cannot be changed. Preventing the eggs from hatching will ensure your product stays good for consumption. Storing in a cool dry place such as a cellar will also prevent the insect eggs from hatching and ruining your product.


    Placing Dry Ice in the bottom of a dry food storage container is a very economical way to fumigate and store dry goods for an extended amount of time. Make sure the Dry Ice is not frost covered, as that will add moisture. Put one to two ounces of Dry Ice per five-gallon storage container in the bottom and then pour in the dry food. As the Dry Ice sublimates it replaces the oxygen in the container with CO2. Leave the lid on but not tightly sealed until the Dry Ice completely sublimates. Then snap the lid tight. Without oxygen neither bugs nor bacteria can grow. This process is good for seeds, grains, legumes, flower, powdered milk, etc.

    Hope this helps.

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    Here's another way using Mylar Bags and Oxygen Absorbers.
    http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=917445

    Try packing dry goods (wheat, beans, rice, salt, sugar, flour, etc.) in Mylar Bags with O2 Absorbers. An inexpensive and effective way is to fill all of your bags as desired, and seal them most of the way. Seal by standing them inside a bucket and placing an aluminum level across the rim. Push all of the air out of the bag, place it across the level, and seal by running a clothes iron at its highest setting (dry, no steam) across the bag and level. The level will heat up, sealing the bag well.


    When all of your bags are mostly sealed (leaving a two-inch opening), open your package of oxygen absorbers, and put one in each bag. Finish by ironing shut the openings. If you've done it correctly, the next day the bags will be vacuum-packed, and the texture of the packed material will be clearly visible through the bag.


    Mylar Bags are readily available online; less than twenty dollars for forty bags and absorbers, and each would hold about ten pounds of beans or rice. Also, using oxygen absorbers preclude the need for diatomaceous earth, bay leaves, dry ice, carbon dioxide, etc.


    Here is a site I like: http://www.survival-center.com/foodfaq/ff1-toc.htm

    Hope this helps.

  6. #6

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    i went over the counter long term freeze dried and bulk food items that i know i will eat as in my other post about the long term food in the safety section of the forum here .. i found that i use the store bought items it was easlyer for me right now intill i can get some the plans for the garden and hunting in next year ..

    when i moved up here i bought about two years of long term over the store bought long term food items in no-10 cans and 5 and 6 gallon sized buckets with me to alaska in the conex unit plus all my personal items i was going to need up here ..i also plan to add a another three years to the package to have a five year package for hard times plus a lot of the bulk items like corn potatoes and rice and beans and wheat and other types of diff long term food items in the bigger 5 gallon sized buckets to add to the five year package to stetch it out longer if need be for i figure if something did happen i could make it stetch out with a little help from my garden and maybe hunting here and there ..

    i figure if something does happen it goies to take about that length of time to get back to semi normal liveing up here with everything beening barged in or it comes by plane to the area ..so haveing a basic plan to have something that i can eat for some many years is in my head just a good plan in the long run ..and when those five years everything returns to normal then it ok then ..but it does not i can stetch my basic food supplies a little while longer intill i can get something going ..

  7. #7
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Foxx

    That is some awesome information and was exactly what I was looking for. I don't normally buy in bulk bins. I buy most of my food at the Base Commissary or at Costco, but I'd prefer to re-package some dry goods for emergency food, just incase of this world going to hell in a hand basket. Your two postings and link will help me drastically. Thank you very much!!!

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