Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21

Thread: Dall hunt in the Brooks Range

  1. #1
    Member ArcherBob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Salcha & Clear Alaska
    Posts
    173

    Default Dall hunt in the Brooks Range

    I will be hiking in from the Dalton (No money to fly in).

    What I am wanting to know is if anyone has ever done this or your thoughts on it.

    This will be my first sheep hunt, so any experienced sheep hunters advice would be greatly apreciated.

    Is it feasable to pack out in one trip?


    (Hope no one is offended by my posting general locations)
    Bob

    Become one with Nature......... Then Marinade it.

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Bow hunting? If you are w/ in the 5 mile corridor I would expect you to have plenty of company and I can't imagine being able to pack one out farther than that in a single trip. I also doubt that you will get any first hand info from guys that have done it. I think there may be a post or two in the archives but they don't have any specifics. It seems to be the general consensus that if you want to know about that area you best lace up your boots and either do a scouting trip or just plan for year one to be a test run with a slim chance at finding a legal ram and even slimmer chance at getting in range of it.

  3. #3
    Member ArcherBob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Salcha & Clear Alaska
    Posts
    173

    Default

    I'm actually going to put the bow down and take a rifle for a walk for the first time in over six years.

    I plan on going in 5-7 miles and more than willing to do a couple trips for the meat, was just curiouse if its possible in one.
    Bob

    Become one with Nature......... Then Marinade it.

  4. #4
    Member hoose35's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Soldotna, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    2,891

    Default

    A friend of mine walked in last year with someone. They went approx. 20 miles, got 1 sheep and 1 caribou, they packed out 150plus pound packs, they are still alive, but he said it was by far the hardest thing he has done.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    57

    Default Yes,

    it can be done. We killed two rams last year and packed them out in one trip but it was painfull. I did not prepare for that much weight. I had trouble getting to my feet with my pack but eventually did make the 3 mile trip.

    You would have more weight than we did, because we did not have all our gear with us, it was back at base camp due to the fact we flew in. I was packing a small tent, sleeping bag, spotting scope, bi pod, binoculars, video cam, rifle, game bags, 2 days food, rope, knives, water, and the sheep. Pack was extremley full. My partner was out of food and only packed a small tarp, sleepiing bag, binoculars, knives and water. He was lighter going out than I was.

    This year I will make two trips if I am lucky enough to score a sheep. Probably do it in the same amount of time and with less effort.

  6. #6
    Member Hoyt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    1,154

    Default

    Always hear people say you'll have lots of company. I walked in 7 miles a few years ago, and spent a week in there. I killed a nice ram. Saw a good number of sheep, and blew a stalk on a Hog. Only person I ever saw was my hunting partner. I'm sure there is a better chance of running into people, as opposed to a fly out, but I don't think you'll see hoards of people. Look at topo's, research old posts, and go for it. We made one trip out, but we went in light, and then brought the sheep out with two people. Our packs were heavy, probably 100 lbs. Looking back, we should have just done two trips. People carrying out 150-200lb packs are dancing with the devil. You break an ankle 5 miles in, good luck. You are in the middle of nowhere up there, not much for medical services. Be smart, and safe. If you're going by yourself, make a couple trips, and go in light as possible. Although you need to be realistic for safety sake, go in with the mindset that you are going to hike in further than the next guy. Don't stop right at 5 miles and hunt, unless you're seeing rams. People arenít going to give up to much info (although some do for some reason) on a specific spot, but there is plenty of land up there to hunt. Your chance of success is statistically lower walking in then flying in. Thatís a simple fact. However, guys have been successful. It will be tough for sure, but you can't win if you don't enter.

  7. #7
    Member Hoyt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    1,154

    Default

    Why don't you want to try to bow hunt? It would be a huge challenge (when isnít sheep hunting?), but from the road to 5 miles in, is a lot of country. Statically speaking there has to be some good rams somewhere within that boundary. Iím sure there have been successful people up there. I liked the suggestion in an earlier post about using this first year as more or less of a ďscoutingĒ trip, while still hunting. Who knows what you find until you get out there!

  8. #8
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the 907
    Posts
    2,326

    Default

    You will have LOTS of friends around you, so I'd look to hike in somewhere where it is a real pain in the butt.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  9. #9
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,443

    Default

    Seen legal rams up there right off the road west of the Deitrich river. I practically lived up there the whole hunting season in 2007. You will have to bow hunt, because your within the corridor if you hunt the west side of the HWY. Make sure you understand the "Gates of the Arctic" National park because, everything that feeds to the west from the mountain range IS PARK, and everything feeding to the East is huntable. the range runs from just north of Coldfoot all the way to "Last spruce Tree" and beyond. You just have to glass along the way, its a big area that runs 50 -plus miles, Lots of black bear and some griz too, it was eery bowhunting in there 'cause of all the brush and thick spruce to go thru.
    Now,Rifle hunting the right side of the HWY (south of Atigun) you will probably have to hike in quite aways, its doable, and its all about gettin' lucky seeing one if your just out of the 5 miles, many places to go, a huge area, and you will see the trucks parked along the way for weeks at a time in pullouts, gravel pits, and creek berms, I never heard of anyone vehicle getting messed with. I hunted moose up there, and nobody touched my truck. Your just gonna have to scope it out in June or July and see actually where you want to go, come up with your plan and then execute on the 10th of Aug. There is sheep there, just alot of time glassing. Get a window mount for your spotter.

  10. #10
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, Ak.
    Posts
    4,191

    Default

    On the west side of the Hiway there is some parcels of private land within Gates Park. There is even a specfific season for private lands within the park.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  11. #11
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,443

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by martentrapper View Post
    On the west side of the Hiway there is some parcels of private land within Gates Park. There is even a specfific season for private lands within the park.
    There are parcels of private land there Yes, but most of it public and huntable, as long as you stay out of the Park, I have been in the office and talked to Fish and Game in Coldfoot, I have taken some nice animals out of there, and have drew permits for the area in the past. There is alot of private land near Wiseman too, but I stay away from there, Anyone who wants to hunt this side is going to have to do extensive research with some detailed maps.

  12. #12
    Member shphtr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    1,376

    Default

    Yes to both of your questions. I have elected not to pick up this gauntlet. I do have a friend who has done this for the past 2 years. !st year he shot a small full curl - rifle. This past season he only saw one possible legal ram which he did not get. As I recall he walked in 17 miles BEFORE he started hunting. After looking at the maps and doing a bit of calculating he estimates he hiked approx. 90 miles counting the trip in and out. Since one of his partners carried the food his pack weighed 85 lbs both in and out for a 10 day hunt. Pretty much in every valley he hunted there was already someone there or someone showed up before his party left. One thing is for sure: you will earn any full curl you get .... and have an awesome experience that can not be purchased for any amt. of money. Be safe since s*&% does happen. Would strongly recommend if solo a GPS and sat phone. Good Luck.

  13. #13
    Member ArcherBob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Salcha & Clear Alaska
    Posts
    173

    Default Great

    Thanks for all the replies guys, I definately was not looking for or wanting locations. I have hiked the area east and know it better than many people probably do. Just wanted some of these "my buddy did it and..." stories so I could get a feel for possible distances, pack weight, concernes, etc... Which is exactly what I got, which is why this forum is great!

    Hoyt, good point on the bow hunting for five miles. Maybe if I elect to take a friend I will carry the bow and he can do the rifle portion. What a feat that would be, but i'm up for it. However if I don't go on a rifle hunt soon the wife is going to really wonder why i keep buying more and more guns and never leave the back yard with them.


    Thanks again for all the Info guys
    Bob

    Become one with Nature......... Then Marinade it.

  14. #14

    Default

    I have a real hard time believing 2 guys can pack out a caribou AND a sheep in ONE trip even boned out...and going in light.

    It can be done packing out a ram solo depending on how light you go in and how much overall weight you can handle.

  15. #15
    Member hoose35's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Soldotna, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    2,891

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    I have a real hard time believing 2 guys can pack out a caribou AND a sheep in ONE trip even boned out...and going in light.

    It can be done packing out a ram solo depending on how light you go in and how much overall weight you can handle.
    Here we go, more negative comments. I didn't see anywhere in my post where it said anything about one trip. Honestly, I don't know how far in they were when they got the bou, like I said they hiked in 20 miles or so for the sheep, and on the way out they got the bou, couldn't have been closer than 5 miles though.

  16. #16
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default Hike in

    I did the hike in last year. I got a nice full curl ram. It was the only legal I saw and was able to look over lots of sheep. I had company back there, SYND, a fellow forum member. We were able to both enjoy some solitude and good hunting. We didn't even talk about it or really know who was who until after the hunt and connecting on this board.

    The weather is what got me a ram. We had a snow move in an it pushed the rams down and I spotted him moving to a lower elevation hang out.

    I hiked alot! Up and down too. It's cool country and worth the effort. It's also big country and the sheep trails run long and far. Think 20+ miles far. So what I learned is that sheep can move into your area.

    Just like mentioned before.....there are legal rams within the 5 mile for bow hunting. On the way in we woke up and had one on the hillside and it didn't get more than a look over because it was within the 5 mile on day two.

    I'm hooked now and just want to explore other AK mountain ranges.

  17. #17

    Default

    negative, hardly at all.....

    But reading what you wrote I made an assumption.

    20 miles, got 1 sheep and 1 caribou, they packed out 150plus pound packs.

    The numbers just didnt add up sorry. Take it for what it is, 2 sheep 1 caribou 20 miles 150lb packs would raise your eyebrow if I posted it also.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Kenai, Alaska
    Posts
    195

    Default Pack Dog

    To AB: It is feasable to pack out in one trip, especially with a large dog as your companion and pack animal. A dog can safely pack 25% of it's body weight and perhaps a little more if trained to do so. Maybe a vet could weigh in here but I have packed three different dogs weighing from 60 to 120 pounds over a 10 year period with no adverse effects. The dogs packed their own food and my freeze dried food hiking in and then some of the boned out sheep meat coming out. Think about taking 20-30 pounds off your load for a hike of 15-20 miles--it can make all the difference. Camp, boned meat, horns, and cape may weigh 120-150 pounds coming out depending on size of sheep and your camp weight. I simple can't, or won't, pack this kind of weight coming out of the mountains. But I can handle around 100 pounds and feel somewhat safe about it. If you don't have a large dog, you may be able to borrow one from a friend. Take a couple test hikes first to see how it goes. It has worked for me on several sheep hunts, some of which resulted in trophy rams. It's a great way to go--especially if you are going alone!

  19. #19
    Member Chisana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Juneau, Alaska
    Posts
    1,439

    Default

    Just a comment on sheep weight - I have brought six out of the field that were not boned out. The average weight at the meat processor was 75 pounds. This includes all four quarters on the bone, boned out rib meat, neck meat and back straps sans tenderloins eaten in the field. I have seen some mighty tiny bags of boned at sheep meat at air strips with hunters claiming that was the whole sheep. Again, just a comment. Take it for what you will.

  20. #20
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    On my goat hunt this past season my hunting partner each bagged a goat about 1.5 miles from spike camp. We boned them out completely and w/ hide it was a miserable hike back to the high camp. We did get them down though I stashed some of it 1/4 mile from camp and made a second quick trip after about an hours rest. The next day we didn't even think of dragging it all down the mountain instead we layed the capes out and hauled all of the meat and gear only leaving behind what we needed for another nights bare-bones stay up high. I don't know how heavy that load back to spike camp was but it was a good bit north of 100lbs and I wasn't carrying anything extra in my pack besides the essentials for a day hunt.I can't fathom anyone trying to carry a 10-day hunt's worth of gear and an entire sheep out in one trip alone, at least not in any country I hunt! Heck I would have a hard time hauling that down a paved road for more than a couple miles!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •