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Thread: water fuel filter advice

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    Default water fuel filter advice

    I have a yamaha 70 horse outboard, use 12 gallon plastic fuel tanks. I primarily refuel by using 5 gallon cans. my question is should i install a water fuel seperator? if so can someone reccomend me a type or brand?

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    Definitely - get a Racor S3213 set up from the Boat Shop - you can replace just the filter element and move the drain bowl between the new elements. I put a new one on very spring and regularly drain the bowl - great system, easy to use, and will save your bacon.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Amen to that!

    I wouldn't run out in the salt w/o a fuel and water separator. It could indeed save your life. Cheap insurance... and be sure you replace filter at the beginning of each season.

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    Default just curious

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    I wouldn't run out in the salt w/o a fuel and water separator. It could indeed save your life. Cheap insurance... and be sure you replace filter at the beginning of each season.
    I too use the filter. Just curious if you specifically intended to say "replace filter at the BEGINNING of each season"?

    I ask because I don't know... I have always changed the filter at the end of the season when I go through the winterizing process. Is this wrong?

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    I also have the Racor w/ the clear bowl on the bottom, its usefull in the sense you can see water in the bowl if your fuel is contaminated.
    I dont change the filter every year, maybe I should? I always get my fuel at the pump and its generally very clean. What I do is carry a extra filter that I have vacumm sealed in case I need one on the river.
    So far I never have, the theory is if I am out and happen to get some bad fuel I can drain the tanks and hopefully refill and then have a new filter to get me home. Have never put this theory to use so thats all it is at this point.
    Obviously having good fuel to replace bad fuel in a remote spot may not happen, but I know I would never be able to clean the tanks 100% and at least w/ a spare filter I have a chance.
    Most of my time is on the rivers and once a year down to Homer, for peace of mind maybe its a good idea to change it yearly anyway? I just think about how many hours I put on a boat every year, compared to my truck (wish it was the other way-round) and how often do I need to change the truck filter? Not very often.

    Quote Originally Posted by wiso_67 View Post
    I have a yamaha 70 horse outboard, use 12 gallon plastic fuel tanks. I primarily refuel by using 5 gallon cans. my question is should i install a water fuel seperator? if so can someone reccomend me a type or brand?
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I haven't changed my boat filter every year, though did change it at the beginning of last season. The way I look at it, there are times where having the engine fail could put me and my family at risk, so anthing I can do to reduce that, I will. With filter elements costing ~$30, swapping it out every 100-200 hrs, or 1-2 seasons is cheap insurance. I also carry a spare element on the boat.

    As far as fuel filters on the truck, I change mine out every 12k miles. $10,000 turbo diesel engine, ~$1000 if the fuel injectors get trashed, and a $30 fuel filter. The math is pretty simple.

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    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    have racor filters on ocean boat and riverboat but over last year also use the black mister funnel @ pump or from can. had major problem 80 miles out of whittier from bad fuel in cans and now over cautious.
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
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    Paul, I have to agree on the diesels, I was thinking more on gas engine since we were talking OB'S.
    Many people never change their auto filter untill there is a problem, (not recomended on an boat). and I personally prefer preventive maintenance. point being fuel from a pump is usally pretty darn clean these days.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I haven't changed my boat filter every year, though did change it at the beginning of last season. The way I look at it, there are times where having the engine fail could put me and my family at risk, so anthing I can do to reduce that, I will. With filter elements costing ~$30, swapping it out every 100-200 hrs, or 1-2 seasons is cheap insurance. I also carry a spare element on the boat.

    As far as fuel filters on the truck, I change mine out every 12k miles. $10,000 turbo diesel engine, ~$1000 if the fuel injectors get trashed, and a $30 fuel filter. The math is pretty simple.
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by WinMag View Post
    I too use the filter. Just curious if you specifically intended to say "replace filter at the BEGINNING of each season"?

    I ask because I don't know... I have always changed the filter at the end of the season when I go through the winterizing process. Is this wrong?
    I change mine when I winterize. That way I haven't forgotten to do it before I head out next spring, plus if there was any water in the filter then I don't know if that could possibly freeze over the winter and do anything.

    Last year I got a Racor and put it ahead of my regular fuel filter. Now I can drain the Racor's bowl if there's any water. Bad thing about I/Os is that the Racor bowl is not plastic like the ones used for outboards. So I can't just eyeball it to see if there's any water.

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    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WinMag View Post
    I too use the filter. Just curious if you specifically intended to say "replace filter at the BEGINNING of each season"?

    I ask because I don't know... I have always changed the filter at the end of the season when I go through the winterizing process. Is this wrong?
    I always replace my Raycor after a short shake down cruise. I've learned the hard way. You put a brand new one on (either at the end of, or the beginning of the season) and there will certainly be some consendation in the fuel tank, even if topped off. Topping off will reduce this from ocurring, but not eliminate it.

    My lesson learned this past year was - don't replace the filter and plan on your first trip of the year being a long one. Plugged up the first filter solid with water. Replaced and repeated. You never know what's going to happen each year. Plan on a short shake down cruise and expect to deal with some water.

    I always wait on replacing until I'm sure I'm running fairly water-free. Oh yeah, I have two filters - one with a clear see-thru bowl (first in line) and a solid on the outboard with a water sensor and alarm.

    YMMV

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