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Thread: What kind of campers do you use?

  1. #1
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    Default What kind of campers do you use?

    I'm in the market for a cab over camper for my long bed 1 ton. I have very little experience with them and I would like to hear what you guys use. It will be used in the summer but I would like the option of winter trips..any ideas on good brands. Not looking for new, just good!
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Default

    A tent

    890
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  3. #3
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    Default campers??

    I'm with Powdermonkey......Why limit yourself....when you can carry your house on your back.

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    Default Bigfoot...

    I have a 16-foot Bigfoot pull along travel trailer in a 1993.5 vintage. The dry weight is 2200 lbs. It pulls nicely and is equiped with a 4 burner propane stove/oven, over sized propane refridgerator/freezer, ample storage space, a toilet/shower compartment, and propane heater. The bench folds out to sleep one/two people as well does the dining table. Is is a single axled two piece fiberglass molded shell. It serves me well to areas along the Alaska road system. Other travel trailer considerations might include Casita with similiar options but a more compact design.

  5. #5
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    Default Buy Used!!!

    I'm no expert but here's my suggestion.

    Buy used, buy used, buy used.

    I see these the most - Lance, Bigfoot, Fleetwood, S&S campers.

    Kind of depends on what you need. I'm a back packer and use a tent more times than not but I have a Fleetwood Elkhorn for keeping the wife and youngest happy when necessary. It's also nice to have when we head to the lake for a day or two. Used is good. Used and obsolete is better. Fleetwood no longer makes campers. Finding a deal on one is that much easier.

    As for backcountry adventures - if there's a road to it - you'll likely spend the night parked next to someone... Adventure starts where the roads end...

    Good luck

  6. #6
    Member summitx's Avatar
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    Default

    got a 96 fleetwood, if your interested that would fit real nice in the back of your truck

  7. #7
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Coachman

    I have an older Coachman pop-up. Works fairly well as I do not have to raise the top to just crawl in for a sleep. It really helps when you are going somewhere and am not sure of the conditions. Extra food, a different tent or other gear can be thrown in so that you can change for the conditions of where you are going to hunt.

    Looking to upgrade this year if I can. Some of the rental places sell their units after a couple of years and it is easy to upgrade to a lightly used unit.
    "Never again shall one generation of Veterans abandon another".
    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  8. #8
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Default Check out truck max weight

    If you have a single rear wheel truck you maybe surprised how rapidly you can go over the max weight, even with a 1 ton. Check the owner’s manual for your particular model. My 10’ Lance is about as big as you can go in a diesel 1 ton. And I do recommend Lance, great camper.

    As for the tenting types, I do a fair amount of back pack hunting myself, but November on the Haul Road is much nicer with heat and lights IMHO.

    Happy New year all,
    Dave

  9. #9
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Default Campers

    Depends on what you want to spend. I've seen a few mid-nineties 9-10' go for $3,000.

    I have a 1976 10.5' Mobile Traveler that I picked up for $600. It sleeps 5, has power and water. Of course when I bought it the fella said "everything works" when in fact nothing worked. It took 2-3 days to straighten out the plumbing and electrical. It weighs about 2200 and its been well worth it for camping with the wife and kids (3).

    The most important issues to look for regarding a camper IMO is roof leaks. The reason I bought my '76 is because it is tight and didn't have any leaks.

    Obviously the best time to buy is April-June, there will be quite a few in the paper and they go quick.

    Good luck,
    Tim

  10. #10
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Daveintheburbs

    Dave: I got caught in a severe thunderstorm on the haul road this year in August. We were only a half mile out but without packs as it was 75 degrees when we left the truck on a stalk. By the time we finished processing my bou, and the tundra started to turn white from the dime sized hail, I was glad to have a warm, dry, roomy place to change and climb into a bag upon return.

    Campers do have a place in Alaska as a good base camp.
    "Never again shall one generation of Veterans abandon another".
    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  11. #11
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    Default

    i have 11'3" Lance cab over nice roomy rig, for cab over. i forget what year it is.????late 90'S model # is 945. carry it on my 1 ton with out any problem have air bags to help stablize. actually thinking about selling as it does not get used alot. if interested pm me.
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
    MASTER BOWHUNTER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR; MEMBER UNITED BLOOD TRACKERS; POPE & YOUNG MEASURER

  12. #12
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Default

    I have a Fleetwood Angler 8T. While it may not fit your truck, I believe that they made one that will. They are a basic unit, but are priced right and work awesome. Keep your eyes open and wallet full. The deal will come.

    Think light-weight. Even after you have bought it and are loading for the weekend.

  13. #13
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Default couple more comments

    To reemphasise: What you CAN load on the back of a truck and what You SHOULD load can be two different things. While I have never seen (or heard) of an accident that was caused by overloading, I prefer not to do it. Each truck is different. My 2000 Ford F350 Diesel 4X4 long bed has everything going against it for additonal camper weight. Ford rear axle spec limit for bed load severly limits my choice of campers. Heck, reading the max load on the tires, multiplying by two and subtracing the weight of the back end of the 6,000 beast is still limiting. For more discussion on this topic try serching :http://forums.thedieselstop.com/ubbt...&Board=towing1

    Got to agree, used is good!

    And to Daveinthebush. Thanks, been there, done that myself. 6' of unexpected snow five miles back off the Taylor in early Sept. Nice to come back to the rig at the end of the hunt.

    Dave

  14. #14
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Truck

    Yes the bed of a truck will haul more weight than you should.

    That is why when I ordered my last truck and already had a camper I ordered the new Ford diesel, F-250, camper package, off-road package, towing package and E-range tires. My 1,000 pound camper just makes the suspension smooth enough for a smooth ride. The truck really does well, power and suspension. Running it without a load, off-road it is really stiff and bouncy though.

    p.s. My son was working for Ford otherwise I would never have this truck. He saved me 8-9 K on the price.
    Last edited by Daveinthebush; 01-02-2007 at 18:45. Reason: P.S.
    "Never again shall one generation of Veterans abandon another".
    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  15. #15
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    Default S&S

    check out S&S if you find a used, they are well constructed. As said before, watch for signs of leaks, any staining on inside walls, etc. Good thing to do is weigh your truck at the scales too, with a full tank of gas and use it for your GVW instead of going off just what the sticker says. All those accessories add weight you wouldn't think of--bedliner (spray ins add up), steps or running boards, etc, etc.

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