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Thread: In shape ?

  1. #1
    Member mountainboy's Avatar
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    Default In shape ?

    what would be most important body parts to work out for a alabama boy to get ready for a trip to alaska ?not shure were at or what kind of hunt .just thought for now would be good time to start gettin ready , cheapest .lol i figure build -legs n wind .i deer hunt now in the mountains but when i go up the side -shew i get plum out of air before i get to the top .other than that im fairly stought .just a thought .need something to keep me on trac lol

  2. #2
    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Legs, back and wind are always a good thing to work on.

    I've already started conditioning for an August Sheep hunt. I've been hiking on a mountain near my house with an 60 pound back pack about two hours twice a week, that load will increase as the season nears. Cardio on either my bike or the elliptical machine at the gym.

    If your moose hunting you'll be packing out a lot of weight on your back, 6 round trips if your by yourself. If your sheep or goat hunting you'll be breathing hard. One trip up and down would be optimum if you can pack it all, perhaps 150 pounds of meat, horns and gear.

    General overall body strength is good but legs and lungs are my focus. Make sure you're not packing any extra weight on your self, that really slows you down.
    Last edited by marshall; 01-06-2010 at 04:17. Reason: typo

  3. #3
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    Throw on a rucksack and start walking up hills. Increase the weight as it gets easier. Squats in the gym and cardio will get you good to go.

  4. #4
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Lots and lots of cardio....Legs and Abs.

  5. #5
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Legs and lungs. Followed by back and abs (for the pack out ).
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  6. #6
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Additionally

    Speed, flexibility, and balance too

    So after your done with your hill climb, hit the weights, go to yoga, rest up a day then practice your dance. Every other day do 400m track sprints.

    To avoid over use injury mix in some swimming and cycling.

    Make sure you BMI is less than 25 or a body fat % around 9 for a dude.

    Then you'll be ready to climb mountains over and over and over again.

    Oh and some sport rock climbing with your friends would help also. At least some gym climbing.

    Hint.......that dance.....make it with a lady.

  7. #7
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    As you and other have said legs and lungs. Leg endurance and cardio can not be stressed enough.

    A quick google search shows the highest peak of Alabama as Mt. Cheana at 2407 feet. A similar search of Alaska shows the top 50 peaks all over 8336 feet. Alaska is BIG country!

    You said you are not sure what you will be hunting. Even if you do not hunt in a mountainous area, Alaska will still demand alot of your legs and cardio. The flat and low lying areas have tundra and muskeg. Very uneven ground that is water saturated to the point you can be in water over your calves while walking through knee to chest high scrub brush. The walking is slow and demanding. Worst than walking through a freshly plowed and very muddy field, for miles!

    If you get plum out of air before you get to the top of your mountains, walk them more often with weighted back packs. Use a day on your weekends just to walk, slow and steady, all day. You will build your wind.

    As an example, before being assigned to Alaska, I was in Camp Casey, Korea. Casey is boardered by the SouSan Mountain Range. The range has four peaks that over look Camp Casey. From my room on post it was about six or seven miles up the road to the park entrance. There were trails that went up and down the range connecting all four peaks. The trails varied from seven to ten miles round trip from the park entrance.

    On my weekends, I would grab a 35-50 pound bag with food and drink for the day. I'd walked to the park, hiked all four peaks and walked back to the room. Any where from 17-24 miles depending on the trails I choose that day. Taking my time it normally took me ten to twelve hours of steady hiking to complete the task. It was a days work, and the first few times it took most of the next week to recover. Once my body adapted, it became a lot easier.

    Just my thoughts, hope it helps.
    Ralph

  8. #8
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Hike around with a pack and 50# in it to start. Then start adding more weight.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  9. #9
    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    In shape for hunting Alaska we call SHEEP SHAPE
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
    "Rebellion is in my blood, I was born an American"
    Μολών λαβέ

  10. #10
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    I'm in shape

    ROUND is a shape!!!

  11. #11
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I think carrying weight around in a pack is overrated, personally. I do some backpacking in the summer and thus get some practice carrying weights, but I've never trained for a sheep hunt by carrying hundred pound packs. What I do is participate in as many strenuous cardio activities as possible. In an average winter week I'll play a game of Ultimate twice, climb a local mountain twice, and either go for a long hike or go backcountry skiing once. In the summer that activity level usually gets doubled. I find getting in shape and staying in shape is much easier if you make it a central part of your lifestyle. Instead of having to schedule in time at the gym, I find myself looking forward to my hikes and time spent skiing. I don't think of it as exercise - it is just more time spent afield with the side benefit of keeping me in shape for hunting season. Hunting season in turn keeps me in shape for skiing, which keeps me in shape for spring hiking and fishing. Find something you enjoy that makes you breathe hard for extended periods of time. Do that and you'll stay in good shape while actually having fun.

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    I'll be a resident this next season (sometime in july/aug actually, can't remember the date). I'm so pumped to get out that i joined a gym just before Christmas. I've NEVER been in good shape... have had lots of physical issues over the years, hips and shoulders all replaced, a couple of kidney transplants and a handful of misc crap. However, THIS is the year I will be carrying meat on my back. i WILL be ready for it (or die trying. lol).

  13. #13
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    "Find something you enjoy that makes you breathe hard for extended periods of time"

    Great advice.....if you know what I mean!!!! - I would add frequency!

  14. #14

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    I get myself in shape about 2 weeks prior to my next hunt. Running and weight training.

  15. #15
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    Speed, flexibility, and balance too

    So after your done with your hill climb, hit the weights, go to yoga, rest up a day then practice your dance. Every other day do 400m track sprints.

    To avoid over use injury mix in some swimming and cycling.
    Good point Bighorse. Balance and agility are very important too. It doesn't matter how strong you are if you can't keep on your feet when climbing on wet vegetation or scrambling over rocks. Being in good cardio shape will help with your agility... it's a lot easier to keep your balance and footing if you're not puffing for breath. But training yourself to be more agile and flexible helps a lot.

    I'm with Brian in that I think it's a lot easier to just stay in shape through an active lifestyle, rather than trying to get into shape before a hunt. I find ways to stay physically active year round. If I were to go on a sheep hunt tomorrow (wouldn't that be sweet?!) I feel I'd be in shape for it. And with the couple of extra pounds I put on due to a healthy holiday diet, I could probably shave a couple of pounds from the food supplies in my pack.

    I'm not a big fan of training with a heavy pack. I carry a day pack during my excursions for simple conveniences, and I'm sure it helps get my back in shoulders in better shape, but I like to enjoy my time outside.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  16. #16
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    Default Mental training...

    In addition to all the good info regarding physical conditioning, do some mental conditioning as well. For example, I hike up and down a hill around here in the summer with a heavy pack as part of my Sheep Shape training. Sometimes a day rolls around where I am tired, a little stiff and sore from the previous day in the weight room, did'nt get much sleep and it's raining cats and dogs and I was planning on adding more weight to my pack and hiking that day. My body and mind says "ah, go lay on the couch, it's raining anyway"... It's easy to skip that day and rest up and wait for a dry day. But... sometimes I take advantage of those times to push myself mentally (and physically). The point is, do something strenuous sometimes when don't feel like you have it in you and you have to force yourself mentally to deal with the situation. Eat a powerbar, suck down some gatorade and go for that butt buster hike with extra weight in your pack in the pouring down rain, and add an extra half hour to it. It helps when you are faced with a long meat packing hike in the rain, the dark, the mountains and wore out from the previous 5 days in the woods.

    Another way is to time your hikes and try to beat your time with more weight.

    Hike with some friends and push each other to go a little faster, a little longer or a little steeper.

    Just a couple of examples of incorporating "mental training" into your physical training. Make yourself do what you need to do regardless of the circumstances. Get creative.

    DISCLAIMER!!!....Obviously use some common sense and don't do anything to hurt yourself!!

  17. #17
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Set up a stair climber machine in your shower. Put on all your raingear and a 50lb pack. Turn the water on cold and do an hour a day. You should be ready by fall.

  18. #18
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    good call Perry, i might add too that i like hiking in the woods around home too.. following game trails through the brush, it takes a lot to push the brush, keep on track with your gear on. i also find it more enjoyable then hiking the prescribed trail, as there aren't any out where we are hunting. we have all waded through willow, tangled mountain birch and black spruce. doing so with a pack on, and carrying a rifle on your hands and knees to get through it is quite taxing on a person..as well give you a handle on your gear.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  19. #19
    Member mountainboy's Avatar
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    Unhappy wife says no !

    Quote Originally Posted by shphtr View Post
    "Find something you enjoy that makes you breathe hard for extended periods of time"

    Great advice.....if you know what I mean!!!! - I would add frequency!

    wife wont agree.says go to the gym.lol any female trainers out there to volenter? just kidding .dont want to offend any one.

  20. #20
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Balance is critical; a buddy of mine badly twisted his ankle falling off a log last moose season. He couldn't put any weight on it. If we hadn't had the wheelers it would have been ugly. Typical terrain around here is thigh-high deadfall covered in a tangle of grass, alder thickets, and willows sitting in ankle-deep mud. You're using your hands as much as your feet to get through it. Good fitting boots will help, but mostly you have to be tuned to carrring a load on your back while off balance.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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