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Thread: Savage quality?

  1. #1
    Member Ripper's Avatar
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    Question Savage quality?

    Anybody own the Savage Weather Warrior 116 model? I am looking at getting one in 338 WM. They seem to be pretty good bang for the buck (I am on a budget). From what I can tell the quality isn't too bad. Maybe my biggest concern is the quality of the synthetic stocks, but shops around here don't have any to look at. Has anybody used the accutrigger?

    I am not needing anything super-accurate...the kill zone on a moose isn't tiny. I want something that will be

    1)reliable
    2)not too heavy, and
    3)stand up to the wet weather.

    I know there is a fair amount of negative opinion about Savage, but has anyone owned one that failed on them? Who has owned them and not liked them? Preferences are one thing, but failures are another. Thanks for any help.

  2. #2
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    If you average all the current bolt action rifles built today Savages are the most accurate rifle built out of the box. Period.
    That being said they are usually not as smooth in how the action functions and there syn stocks have that classic tupperware feel and ping.
    They have the best factory trigger among all the major gun makers. I own some and I wouldnt hesitate to purchase anymore.
    Tennessee

  3. #3

    Default Savage qulity

    I have owned Savage rifles for years. I recently sold my left hand .338 stainless composite 116 that I bought in 1996. The only reason I sold it was I just wanted another left hand Browning Stainless Stalker and found one for a great deal. I already had a Ruger .338, too, so I sold one. A friend wanted to buy it for his left handed son, and we all were happy. That Savage was and is one of the most accurate rifles I have ever owned. It was a bit rough when it was new, but after a few dozen rounds through it, the action was getting noticably smoother, and it just got better the more I shot it. The ONLY thing I don't like about the Savage .300 or .338 is the loading opening. When you retract the bolt, you can't just press the round against the bolt face and push it down into the magazine like most rifles. There is a roughly 1/2 inch block in the magazine right below the bolt face, and you will jam a round in there if you are not paying attention.
    For accuracy, toughness or a tight budget, you just can't go wrong with a Savage. They are not the prettiest rifle built, but are probably the best gun for the money you will find anywhere. Go for it.
    Also, I have never heard of a Savage failing anyone, unlike some of the "better" brands, and the only negative thing I have ever heard anyone that has shot or owned one is that the Savage bolt rifle is ugly, which it is. But it's accuracy, reliability and toughness make it a beauty in the Alaskan bush where it counts.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  4. #4
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    Default I concur...

    I have the same model in the 300 wsm. It is a very accurate rifle right out of the box and lightweight too. Definitely not the nicest looking gun but it is a good value for the dollar. So far it's held up nicely on my wet weather hunts.

  5. #5

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    I have the smaller version in 223. It has over 10,000 rounds through it (logged count on sod poodles and yotes), and it will still make or break an inch at 100 yards with many load combos, including cheap factory reloads. It's had the stuffing kicked out of it and looks it, but you can't fault it for tough and accurate.

  6. #6
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Default Magazine

    I don't own a Savage or know anyone who has, but I'm impressed with some of the lofty comments about the Savages. I never liked the fact that Savages don't have detatachable/removable/hinged magazines, at least the models I've looked at.

    Tim

  7. #7
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    Default

    From my experiences, Savage "stainless" rifles seem to rust a bit quicker and easier than say, a Winchester or Remington rifle that was stainless.

  8. #8
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    I've got one in a .204 Ruger , it shoots and functions great. Yes they arent the prettiest rifle and the stocks lack some finishing work on the synthetics but I havent got one complaint on mine. The accu-trigger is sweet and I have had no issues with the stainless on mine. I use it mostly during winter for fur bearers and its been a great gun so far. I wouldn't hesitate to buy another one if it fit the bill in what I was looking for.

  9. #9
    Member H. C.'s Avatar
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    Default Good choice for the money

    Savage has been widely recognized by most folks as offering a great rifle for the money. I own several and they are good solid performers. I have never had a problem with any of these firearms. All of my Savage rifles have been accurate, well built, and comfortable to shoot. Though, for a while, their triggers were a little stiff, they have remedied that problem.

    So Many guns, So Little Time!

  10. #10
    Member RANGER RICK's Avatar
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    My wife's rifle is the 338 model scoped.
    Not a problem one with it .
    It is light , accurate and she picked it out .

    RR
    Practice does not make perfect !!!!!
    Perfect Practice makes perfect !!!!!!!!!!


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  11. #11

    Default Savage info from their website + my junk = looong

    http://www.savagearms.com/downloads.htm
    Download the main catalog and take a look at the Model Series 11/111, 14/114, and 16/116. There are guns with either detachable & removeable box magazines or hinged floorplates. If you have trouble reading their catalog in your PDF reader, try keying "ctrl A" concurrently, which will "select all" and highlight the text in white on a colored background. This is also helpful while surfing the web where some so-called web "masters" use black or dark backgrounds with colored fonts or fonts that are too small or thin that are almost impossible to read, showing that those who did the layout don't understand how human eyes work.

    http://www.savagearms.com/2006_pressrelease.htm
    You can now get the AccuTrigger in 22's and 17HMR's. The latter would seem to be a good, cheap varminter that won't destroy small critters' hides.

    While I've only owned a Savage single shot 20ga as my first personally bought gun when I was 10, it was a game bird harvester with very few peers. I have shot many Savages and can still remember, when as kids, we'd be shooting our 10/.22's and watching them fling the bullets wherever they seemed to have a mind to, while a friend with his Savage .22 would shoot his like it was a laser. Nailed anything and everything. Changed our young minds on a lot of things with the proof before our eyes. And, after watching Buck McNeely of The Oudoorsman fame build his own 30-06 at the Savage factory and seeing how they made them so accurate out of the box and watching Buck harvest animals on several continents with this gun since then, I'd definitely go with them for a turn-key factory-made tack driver. Especially after my last "bigger name" guns were all over 2MOA out of the box, which is unacceptable for what they charged. When you factor in some of the real-world hunting aspects such as accuracy, quality adjustable triggers, dependability in all conditions, weight and balance, cheek weld fit, length of pull, stock pad fit and recoil dampening, and couple them with Savage's work on improvements in stocks (some Hunter models are now available with H-S Precisions, while some of their Law Enforcement models have H-S, H-S Folder, Choate and McMillan as choices) and aesthetics (some visible in the downloadable '06 catalog, one online: http://www.savagearms.com/93r17BTVS.htm ), then look at the economic value, then it's pretty much a no-brainer since I've witnessed more than once someone with a thousand or multi-thousand dollar "work of art" gun humbled by someone with a few hundred dollar Savage. And that's what people really remembered.

    As far as their stain-less steel deteriorating faster than others, this may be true, but, carrying Birchwood-Casey's Sheath towelettes, AKA Barricade Take-Along Gun Cloths, and wiping down any gun with them regardless of steel type, is smart insurance for long-term useability. If you happen to carry a Bore Snake in the field, wrapping a Sheath towelette on the coil is a quick, light cleaning, lubing and preservative for the bore, especially if you've ever had a bottle of CLP spring a leak and you don't care to carry fluids anymore. Plus, you can use the used Sheath rag to help start a fire when your through with it.


    More info:
    Barricade, the gun cleaner-lube-preservative towelette formerly known as Sheath:
    http://www.birchwoodcasey.com/sport/index.html
    (click on: "Maintenance" or the can of "Gun Scrubber", then, click in the right hand side of the page on "Cleaning & Maintenance", then "Barricade")

    Towelettes or "Take Alongs":
    25 pack: http://www.outdoorsuperstore.com/pro...sp?prod=500126
    100 pack: http://www.outdoorsuperstore.com/pro...sp?prod=281679

    Aerosol & liquid:
    http://www.outdoorsuperstore.com/pro...UST+PREVENTIVE
    [Haven't bought from these folks, just some examples of the product. The last time I bought some, I bought a hundred and paid around 10 cents each. But, that's been awhile and the dealer was a lifelong friend. YMMV]

    Sheath usage as part of proper cleaning, lubing and protecting from Field & Stream:
    http://www.outdoorlife.com/outdoor/p...606816,00.html
    (Outdoor Life owns both)

    Buck McNeely: http://www.outdoorsmanint.com/
    Last edited by codeofthewest; 12-24-2006 at 14:51. Reason: info

  12. #12
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    Default

    Another thing that they have going for them that no one has mentioned is that a lot of guys are makeing "Switch barrels" out of them.
    Because of their unique "ugly" barrel nut the barrels are removable by the average consumer with a $20.00 wrench. Then with the proper headspace guage (some use a fired case) a barrel of a different caliber installed, all by the owner. One action & scope, & all the calibers you want simply by buying barrels. Nice option to have.
    I've owned Savages in the past & would buy a current Savage as quick as any other maker, probably quicker. I just purchased a MK II BV in .22lr, a heavy barreled gun with a laminated stock & the Accu-trigger & couldn't be happier. Only had a chance to get to the ramge once with it & shot a total of about 60 rds. Two best groups were in the 0.1" range @ 25 yds. That was of course with a scope (3-9x BSA "Sweet .22".)
    Not bad for a stock out of the box gun shooting off a bipod with no sandbags & an average at best shooter.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  13. #13
    New member reuben_j_cogburn's Avatar
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    Thumbs up .338 savage..

    The warrior is also on my list..... We sold a lot of savage bolts at the shop and I can't recall anyone bring disappointed, although I have seen one with a feeding problem at a local range (nobody's perfect)....
    If they are half the gun that the 99 is they are more than worth it.
    My 99c in .308 is my favorite rifle....I'm sure the 116 will follow closely behind...



    night y'all

    reuben...

  14. #14
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    Default

    For the buyer on a budget, you will not go wrong with a Savage. I have four and they are all reliable, and of course being Savage, extremely accurate.

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