Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: raft rowing frame

  1. #1
    Member anonymous1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kodiak Is.
    Posts
    304

    Default raft rowing frame

    The boys and I just got a Maravia Cyclone drifting raft
    http://www.maravia.com/frames/main.cfm?page=casraft
    ANd now we are ready to fit it out. We have been looking at the NRS stearn frame
    http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.a...08&deptid=1052
    as a starter or would it be wiser to have a full frame with more rowing options.
    They are kinda spendy. There is an aluminum boat shop up the road and we are thinking of having him bend up a custom frame as an option. Any ideas would be appreaciated. We are newbies to rafting.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,449

    Default

    I can't find info on the Cyclone on Maravia's website. How big is it?

    A stern frame makes sense for some boats setup for fishing only, or boats setup for group of paddlers that need oar assist. I'm sure there are some other setups they work well for, but to me they are all specialty rigging. For most uses a central frame, or even a front frame, is more practical. For one thing you have a little better steering control in the middle.

    Also, when your boat goes over a medium (or large) pour over you often find a reversing current on the surface of a hole that wants to pull your boat back into it. If your oars are in the stern, you are slipping through aerated water that is also running back into the hole. It's far better to have your oar blades grabbing the clear forward running water that is near the front of the boat. Admittedly, this is more of a whitewater issue that the casual rafting situation, but you can be surprised sometimes.

    Center frames work better for larger gear & passenger layouts as well. With the stern frame you can put passengers in front, but in order to keep the oarsman's feet clear the gear pile has to go in the middle, and the oarsman is now separated from everyone else. That has some negative safety issues, but is mostly just unsociable. But perhaps that's an advantage in some groups. With a standard frame setup the gear pile is usually in the stern, and the front half of the boat is semi-clear for people space.

  3. #3
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Lightbulb center mass...

    I agree with Jim S completely, and...

    I really feel you have better and more complete control over your boats movement by placeing thr oarsman in the center...where he should be.

    And I just would not feel right being in the back of the boat...where the gear should be.
    By placing yourself in the stern, you will greatly limit your boats movements and capabilities.

    In addition, you might find yourself rafting alone. And when I do that I need to be in the center.

    No science involved in my responce...just my preference based on my experiences.

    Dennis

  4. #4
    Member anonymous1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kodiak Is.
    Posts
    304

    Default thanks Jim

    The raft is 15' x 7'.
    Cyclone Self-Bailing Maravia Raft

    The versatile Cyclone is the same size as Maravia's popular Williwaw 1.5 model but has a diminishing bow design with a standard 7 piece rounded stern. As a paddle boat the stern is a great platform for a sitting guide, or a stern mounted frame. The diminished tube front offers reduced wind resistance, exceptional wave punching power and more interior room. The Cyclone also works well as a center mounted oar rig. Priced here with 2 thwarts.

    Length . 15 Width . .7 Tube Diam. . . .21/16 Weight . . . . .145 lbs.

    The Cyclone is a new model so you have to find it from their product seach. We will mostly be doing slow drifts on flat water. Every thing you said makes good sense.

  5. #5
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    I had a custom frame made for my 14'4" Sotar. If you go that route, decide if you will be using it on remote fly in trips. If so, think about the break down size. This was a huge priority for me as I fly my gear up from North Carolina. Below is a diagram to generate some thought if nothing else. Very lightweight and breaks down small. The seat is just 1/2" poly that is rounded off on edges to prevent chaffing my waders/pants. I put a kayak gel seat on top with 3/8" bungee holding it down in the center. Works like a charm. I despised how large most raft frame seats were. I put the three piece custom Sawyer Pole Cats and the frame in a custom made Sotar dry bag. Then the raft is in a bag of course. Two bags for a 14' raft is about as travel friendly as it is going to get. Just thought I would bring this up in case you were interested in remote float trips. Now is the time to think about it.










    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  6. #6
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kenai, Ak
    Posts
    395

    Default Sweet Frame Dan

    That's a sweet, no frills frame Dan. I like the complete absence of exterior couplings and fittings. Who made that?

  7. #7
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    PM sent.


    -Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  8. #8
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Searching for more cowbell!
    Posts
    1,945

    Default

    Dan, I really enjoy a seat after a few days. How does Carrie (sp) deal with sitting on a thwart for a week at the time?

    Would you extend the frame to add a seat if you were to redesign your frame?

    How have you been (as an official partial hijack)?

    I hear you are catching some halibut in the future. Enjoy!
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  9. #9
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    She likes the thwart. I can make it soft or firm by letting air out of course. That sounds weird

    Seriously, it is comfortable. The bare bones frame is working out great. The kayak gel seat held to my 1/2" poly seat with the bungee rope makes it quite comfortable. Tacky side down holds it in place, smooth side up allows me to slide on and off quickly.


    As for us, doing well man and looking forward to heading your way soon. Looking at two trips this summer if time allows. One could be butts if we get time off then. Just got back on island last night from NC. No internet there. Sorry for the late reply here.

    -Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •