Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Climbing in the powder question

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    106

    Default Climbing in the powder question

    I am having some problems getting hooked up in the powder. I have a 2003 800 Summit X HO, with an MXZX chassis, 144X2 track. Last year was my first year with the sled, so I am trying to learn how to set it up. I was riding with a couple 700 RMKs, one with a 136X2, and 144X2, they were able to climb, while my sled was just going down in the back and blowing a big hole. I think it has something to do with my suspension setting, but possible its something else. Anyone out there have any suggestions??

  2. #2
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,163

    Default limiter strap

    You may want to loosen up your limiter strap to lighten up some ski pressure. You will lose some high speed steering ability, but it will perform much better in the deep stuff.

    The ski-doos I have messed with have a really easy adjustment on the strap that you can do in the field without tools. If you aren't familiar with how to adjust it, it is quite simple.

    The strap(s) is/are on the front scissor of the rear suspension. They look like a piece of rubber belting about 2-3" wide. On the Polaris it takes a 9/16" wrench to loosen the nuts on the straps. The ski-doos I have seen have a big knob which you can usually turn by hand. The strap simply keeps the suspension from hyper-extending when it relaxes. If you tighten it up, it will pull the front of the track up which puts more pressure on the skis by changing the pivot center of the machine. If you loosen it, it puts more track pressure (surface area) down and takes pressure off the skis.

    With the limiter strap out on my 700 RMK it really likes to wheelie when I punch the throttle. This is fun, but a pain in the neck when trying to corner under power. It has a tendency to shoot me off into the brush.

    Anyway, play with the strap and find that sweet spot that performs well for you.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,256

    Default

    Have one of your buddies switch machines for a few minutes and see whether it's the machine or the rider.

    Finesse is as important as horsepower. If you're digging in in the back you may have your thumb into it a little too much. Your machine has more ponies than those of your friends. And if I remember right, your machine still has the old two-stage thumb throttle. I hated those things. I have friends who liked them, but I couldn't get any feel at all.

    Make sure your clutches are set up and operating correctly.
    Last edited by Mr. Pid; 12-22-2006 at 08:28.

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    106

    Default What about the Shocks on the Ski's

    Okay, we will try messing with the front limiter, what about the ski shock adjusters?

    Pid: There was a group, several people with many years of powder riding tried it without much better success. I asked the ski doo shop about clutching, they said the sled came with mountain set ups, and should be good to go.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,256

    Default

    First, most mountain sleds come set up for the higher altitudes than we ride here. Second, your clutches were set up in 2003. Clutch parts get dirty and wear. Springs lose their strength. Motors make horsepower but clutches send that horsepower to the snow. If you want improved performance, start at the clutches. Enough of that.

    I take it you aren't the first owner of this sled? Try to find out what the stock settings were and compare that to how it's set up now. That'll give you some important info as to which way to change it.

    Most of my buddies tighten the limiters on their stock Summits. 800 motors like to wheelie and cinching the limiters helps keep the front end down. Either way, the easiest way to adjust your limiter is to put the machine onto a piece of 4x4 under the front of the track. That'll compress the front of the skidframe and relieve the pressure on the limiter. Once there's slack in the strap you can adjust it easily.

  6. #6
    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    um... Wasilla...
    Posts
    825

    Default

    I know that there are people on here that can get you pointed in the right direction. But if it were me, I would ask the people who ride and work on DOO's all the time. Check out the DooTalk forums. They are the best Ski-Doo only forum on the web. I ride a 1996 Summit 500 and have found a wealth of info there. Good luck.
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you canít tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

  7. #7

    Default Limiter

    Drop the front strap as low as you can. This will enlarge you foot print in the snow and increase you angle of attach which is critical. How many miles on the sled. This will ruin your handling on trails but such is life. As stated above the cluthes could be killing you. Anything more that 2k miles and with no cultch work and you are handicap.
    Hillclimbing and mountain riding in general boils down to a comprimise between track speed, track length, and angle of attack and other things like lugs and rider ability but straight line.....the longest track (2 inch lug) that has the ponies to spin the track the fastest will go the furthest in the steep and deep......straight line only. Oh yea, driver weight has a factor in this also. If you weight 350# don't hope for alot.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •