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Thread: Pilot Pay

  1. #1

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    Moving to Anchorage Feb 1 for my wife's job and will be looking for a flying job. I have talked to few operations already and hopefully something will work out. I don't want to undercut anybody or drag this profession down any further than it already is so I was wondering what the normal pay is? It seems negotiable depending on experience but I don't want to low or high ball anybody. One guy mentioned 30 bucks an hour for a 206. Is that about right? Also are there a lot of companies willing to work out some sort of deal for a pilot to live in Anchorage but work at an outstation say two weeks on/off or something like that or do they just want guys willing to live full time in the remote villages? I know jobs based out of ANC are a little harder to find. Any input would be appreciated. I have about 4500 flight hours but no AK time.

  2. #2

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    A couple years ago I got an offer from an air taxi at Lake Hood, and I think for the five month season it looked like I'd make $25,000. It likely would have been mostly a 206 on floats. At the time I had 1600 TT, around 400 on floats (mostly Beaver) and one season of 135 flying out of Juneau. I don't remember the hourly quote but just punching numbers here, I think it must have been $50-$60/hr for a 400 hour season.
    If you don't have any Alaska time, I might suggest checking the reputation of your possible employer, over the pay. With your flight time, I'm assuming that you've worked commercially. Who you work for can make much more of a difference than how much you make in your first year.
    If your offer is flying a 206 on wheels between towns, that very well could be a good job to get acclimated.

  3. #3
    Member BeaverDriver's Avatar
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    hmmmm....$30.00./hour is pretty low unless there is a monthly stipend with it. Several years ago an AirTaxi on LHD was paying part timers, with float experience and AK experience $55.00/hr for Beavers/206s on floats. That was like in 2002/2003. Many moons ago, in Kodiak, $50.00/hr was the going rate for Beaver pilots... sometimes more if they were returnees and highly experienced. When I started AirTaxi flying in 1988, with the 135 Minimum time, I was making $27.50/hr on wheels only. (PA32 and C206).

  4. #4

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    Out in bethel for 207 sled drivers, ur looking at anywhere from $40 to $50 an hour to $200 to $300 a day

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by LetsflyAK View Post
    Out in bethel for 207 sled drivers, ur looking at anywhere from $40 to $50 an hour to $200 to $300 a day
    I thought they might be lowballing me. Supply and demand can be a killer.

  6. #6
    Member BeaverDriver's Avatar
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    Yup and lots of supply right now. You may be competing with airline furloughees who are returning to their roots just to survive. And with no AK time you will only be competitive if they can pay you a lot less. But the first time you are out in "special AK VFR," trying to get back to Bethel or Kotz, out of options, and picking up ice with a sled full of people, you will wonder what in the heck you were thinking taking this job for 30/hr. Good luck. There are times when that type of flying isn't for the faint hearted. For a slightly tongue in cheek read about the lifestyle, check out CloudDancer.

  7. #7

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    I just interviewed with PenAir. Starting about in a Caravan as a FO you make about 12,000 a year working a 2 and 2 rotation out of KingSalmon or Dillinham. I couldnt afford to take the job. But there are alot of people that will. After about 1year or so your pay moves up.

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    Member BeaverDriver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkwentnaMan View Post
    I just interviewed with PenAir. Starting about in a Caravan as a FO you make about 12,000 a year working a 2 and 2 rotation out of KingSalmon or Dillinham. I couldnt afford to take the job. But there are alot of people that will. After about 1year or so your pay moves up.
    The Caravan does not require an FO. This is Danny's way of convincing his insurance company to lower their rates (or even cover him) by putting some poor sap in the right seat of a caravan where he cannot even log SIC time; and paying him a pittance to do it. There is absolutely no reason to sit in the right seat of a Caravan. You cannot build time as an FO in an aircraft that does not require an FO... Typical of most airlines tho -- trying to shift the cost of doing business to their employees shoulder.

  9. #9

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    Can this time be logged at least as total time? It is sad that after spending 1000's on flight training, the first jobs pays only 12K + non-loggable SIC time.


    Quote Originally Posted by BeaverDriver View Post
    The Caravan does not require an FO. This is Danny's way of convincing his insurance company to lower their rates (or even cover him) by putting some poor sap in the right seat of a caravan where he cannot even log SIC time; and paying him a pittance to do it. There is absolutely no reason to sit in the right seat of a Caravan. You cannot build time as an FO in an aircraft that does not require an FO... Typical of most airlines tho -- trying to shift the cost of doing business to their employees shoulder.

  10. #10
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    as the sole manipulator of the controls you can still log the sic time in a caravan as a co pilot. FAR 293 ride once a a year and you are a qualified crew member, the one or two pilot requirement means nothing. Another example could be a 1900 captian single and dual pilot typed, could the FO not log the sic time with that captian?? Maybe??

  11. #11

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    Thanks for clarifying this, Superpa18173. I thought there had to be some incentive for taking that job. It ain't money for sure...

    Quote Originally Posted by superpa18173 View Post
    as the sole manipulator of the controls you can still log the sic time in a caravan as a co pilot. FAR 293 ride once a a year and you are a qualified crew member, the one or two pilot requirement means nothing. Another example could be a 1900 captian single and dual pilot typed, could the FO not log the sic time with that captian?? Maybe??

  12. #12
    Member BeaverDriver's Avatar
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    Well not really. The FAA has determined that both Pilots cannot claim the same flight time as PIC time. And, since the Van does not require an SIC neither can claim that. So if you were a low time guy and finally made it to Van PIC at PenAir would you allow your quasi-FO to claim any flight time, even if he was manipulating the controls? There is no incentive for taking this type of job. It is tantamount to PFT and not unlike the old Yute Air "bush flying" training BS they used to advertise. Do the PennAir Vans even have controls on the right side?

    In fact here is the FAR [61.51]

    (e) Logging pilot-in-command flight time. (1) A recreational, private, or commercial pilot may log pilot-in- command time only for that flight time during which that person --

    (i) Is the sole manipulator of the controls of an aircraft for which the pilot is rated;

    (ii) Is the sole occupant of the aircraft; or

    (iii) Except for a recreational pilot, is acting as pilot in command of an aircraft on which more than one pilot is required under the type certification of the aircraft or the regulations under which the flight is conducted.

    and for SIC:

    logging second-in-command flight time. A person may log second-in-command time only for that flight time during which that person:

    (1) Is qualified in accordance with the second-in-command requirements of §61.55 of this part, and occupies a crewmember station in an aircraft that requires more than one pilot by the aircraft's type certificate; or

    (2) Holds the appropriate category, class, and instrument rating (if an instrument rating is required for the flight) for the aircraft being flown, and more than one pilot is required under the type certification of the aircraft or the regulations under which the flight is being conducted.

  13. #13
    Member BeaverDriver's Avatar
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    I thought there was another reg involved.

    135.109 Pilot in command or second in command: Designation required.

    (a) Each certificate holder shall designate aŚ
    (1) Pilot in command for each flight; and
    (2) Second in command for each flight requiring two pilots.
    (b) The pilot in command, as designated by the certificate holder, shall remain the pilot in command at all times during that flight.

  14. #14

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    Wish I would have had a copilot in the Van when I flew it. Especially when there was a crap load of stuff to haul on very short flights (Clarks point,Ekuk Cannery and Manokotak). Usually the rampers wised up and did not want to go for a 7 minute plane rides only to have to help unload the 2800+lbs they just loaded. I guess I am just lazy LOL

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