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Thread: preadetor hunting [starting out]

  1. #1
    Member joefish00000's Avatar
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    Smile preadetor hunting [starting out]

    hi all
    after looking at some pics i realy am interested in learning how to call and hunt preadetors. but i realy dont now were to start. i have a 223 and an old rabbit in distress call but again i dont know were to go from here. what areas [near anchorage/matsu] would be a good place to try? how should i go about hunting? i would apriciate any help or advice.
    thanks!

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    I am the least of all people to offer advice since I have yet to harvest a predator but since no one else on this board will speak up here is what I am doing.
    I am looking at all the post on this board to find any snippet of info that might help.
    I purchased an instructional DVD.
    I have been spending hours out in the field attempting to call in a fox (to no avail yet).
    I am looking for areas where I have seen tracks, or other signs that a fox may be somewhere near by.
    Hopefully I will soon score but I am growing a little discouraged.
    Lets hope someone comes up with some good tips to help us both out.

  3. #3
    Member Huntress's Avatar
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    The biggest and best suggestion I can give you...PATIENCE!

    They don't just land in your lap....ok, maybe if your name is Brian M....
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

  4. #4
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huntress View Post
    They don't just land in your lap....ok, maybe if your name is Brian M....
    Ha! Yeah, I used up my luck for the season on my first stand - or so it would seem given my lack of success over the past few calling trips.

    I just went out there and blew on a wounded rabbit call for all I was worth. I called for about 5 minutes, rested for a few, then called some more. I think the best thing I did that helped me find success is that I walked a few miles off the road into an area with absolutely zero sign of other humans - no snowmachine tracks, ATV trails, or anything else. Coyotes and foxes are smart critters, and I understand they learn from previous callers quite quickly. By putting myself in a spot where other callers likely hadn't hit, I think I was able to coax an animal in a little more easily than if I had been in a more accessible area.

  5. #5

    Default Tips

    Here are a few tips that might help get you pointed in the right direction:

    - Bring an open reed caller if you're calling at colder temperatures. The metal reeds always freeze on me at -10 and colder if I'm out calling. The Sceery AP-6 is an excellent model that can make a variety of sounds. You'll always want a couple of mouthcalls and a squeaker with you, just in case they freeze up or become damaged. No need to drive 100 miles to go calling and find that the important piece of gear you need isn't working. If you're going to be strictly mouth calling, take some Chap-stik or something for your lips...they'll get dry.

    -I stay on stand 15 minutes and then move. If you don't have many spots to call, call longer. I think of it as a numbers game and try to get in as many 15 minute stands as I can in a day. If you hear something, or see something holding up, stay longer. If you shoot something early in the stand, keep calling, you could get number 2 or more by doing this.

    -Bring an insulated seat to sit on. Make sure it's quiet and doesn't squeak when you move around on it.

    -Wear some type of snow camo or overwhites to help break you up, even if you're hunting at night. Not a bad idea to camo your rifle too, even if it's just athletic tape or white electrical tape.

    -Make sure you get out your vehicle quietly. Practice at home in the driveway before you leave. Shut off all bells/whistles on the truck, get your rifle out quietly, and don't slam the doors.

    - Once you've chosen your stand, setup so that your rifle is ready to go, aimed in the direction you think the animal should come from. Basically, you need to cut down on movements so that the predator doesn't pinpoint you when it's time to get shoot and run off.

    - Be persistent. The first two years of calling up here, I called in 1 Lynx (out of season), and saw nothing else. Don't watch all of those DVD's and expect Alaska to produce the number of animals called per stand/day, it's simply not. Get the setup information and gear stuff ideas from the DVD's though, there are some great pieces of information in some of them.

    - If you're going to be walking in deeper snow much, get a pair of gaiters, you'll be glad you did.

    - Take emergency items with you, just in case (Lighter/Matches, Extra Clothes, Cell Phone/Sat. phone, Water, Snacks, handwarmers...etc). I went for an accidental swim last year at -30F.

    Hope those ideas help some, good luck.

  6. #6
    Member joefish00000's Avatar
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    thanks for the advice. nice post too

  7. #7

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    have patience, dont expect to call an animal in every time, always be aware of the wind if it's wrong then pass up the location till it's right, you dont want to educate predators as it makes them harder to hunt, try using fawn distress calls which sound more coarse & not as high pitched as a rabit distress, also use coyote/wolf vocals, i hunt in a high pressure hunted area that guys just beat to death with rabit distress so i hunt there when the wind is right,carry both a shotgun & rifle use coyote howls,hunt at night during good moonlight as predators are more confident at night & therefor a bit more braver to aproach your setup also get far away from the road system 95% of the guys just wont take the time or make the effort to snowshoe a couple miles into the bush carrying 2 guns & necessary gear. By getting away from the roads you'll be targeting unmollested critters, you'll make fewer setups but your sucess will increase. Also it will be worth the cost to hire a pilot to fly you over your proposed hunting areas just so you get another view of the area you will learn alot & believe me it's worth the $ for the information gained saves you many miles of footwork. Learn something from every stand weather sucessful or not, did i see tracks,scat, find any kill sites,whats the snow depth that time of yr is there a sufficient food source there to draw in caribou & moose which in turn attracts predators, is this area protected from winds or weather extremes, etc. . .etc. . log all this info in a journal for future reference. If you want to be 1 of the best hunters of predators you need to go above & beyond what the next guys are doing & continue to learn & draw from all of your experiences 95% of the fur is taken by 5% of the hunters, be one of those 5%, goodluck & remember every predator you take, including blackbears & grizz saves moose,caribou,& sheep calves so get out there & start your continued education of predator hunting, gotta go hunt'n so bye 4 now.

  8. #8

    Default Great info.

    predatorhuntr01,
    That was a very well written post with lots of useful information. Logging the hunts is a great one which I've recently started doing, complete with drawings of locations, weather, and any other pieces of useful information.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by predatorhuntr01 View Post
    have patience, dont expect to call an animal in every time, always be aware of the wind if it's wrong then pass up the location till it's right, you dont want to educate predators as it makes them harder to hunt, try using fawn distress calls...........

    What state are you in predhuntr?

  10. #10

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    Hi oats, i currently live in Illinois but hunt predators in every state that i possibly can, if i were only allowed to hunt 1 discipline it would be predator hunting, i live,eat,breath,drink & love predator hunting.

  11. #11
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    Thanks all that have jumped in to help a couple of beginners.

    Predatorhuntr, will a fawn distress call work for foxes? We have lots of deer here in Kodiak but the size difference tells me that foxes would not even think about coming in to that but on the other hand they may think they could get some scraps from a bear eating the fresh warm meal :-)

  12. #12

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    [QUOTE=snowcamoman;644195]Here are a few tips that might help get you pointed in the right direction:

    - Bring an open reed caller if you're calling at colder temperatures. The metal reeds always freeze on me at -10 and colder if I'm out calling.]

    I too have had the metal closed reed calls freeze. I use a Haydel's cottontail caller. It has a rabbit call on one end and a mouse squeak on the other. I keep it in my mitten when I'm not calling, and it if still freezes up, I blow through the squeaker end and cover the little hole in the side of the body. I blow slowly and that thaws the reed out for another call sequence. Repeat as needed. I also carry a piece of white closed cell rigid packing foam to sit on. I tied a cord on it so I can sling it.
    PC gag in place.

  13. #13

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    hi akflyfisher, i've never been to kodiak but will try & make an educated guess as to what may or may not happen, fawn distress calls will probably work but if your targeting strictly foxes i would use what ever their main food source is weather that be hares,rodent distress,E-caller fox vocals,also may work well using woodpecker distress & domestic kitten/cat distress. try hunting in areas that provide the foxes some false sence of security like near outskirts of town, abandoned homesteads, gravel pits. Foxes in my area of the midwest live close to road ditches,culverts,old barns,they live close to human activity because they've learned coyotes avoid these areas due to every passing vehical will pull over & shoot at em, the coyotes have become so thick in my areas that we just dont have the fox population that we had 15-20 yrs ago. & yeah i know predator hunting is totally different there then in the lower 48 blah. . blah . .blah but point being they still eat rabbits& mice & the usual fox diet even carrion that washes up on the beaches, so the best teacher is experience itself but i'd bet you that you will be sucessful using the call i suggested the key is to have patience & keep trying & when you find what works for you ask yourself why, if you can locate a fox & observe him from a distance use whatever call you have & note how he responds to it, watch & learn from him, his route of travel to you vs the wind direction how cautious he responds, anything that can give you an edge & info to file away for future reference, hope you have great sucess in calling & also watch out for the brownies that no doubt will respond to your calls.

  14. #14

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    Actually, foxes are plentiful and relatively easy to call in along the road system in Kodiak. They do not slink around like mainland foxes but tend rush in because there is a lot of competition from other foxes and they don't have to worry about coyotes because there aren't any. The only higher order predator there are brownies.

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    I am still waiting for one to "rush in". I have a friend who happens to be doing the same as I, calling with no luck. He spent the money on foxpro so I won't totally blame it on my calling:-)

  16. #16

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    Hey akflyfisher, dont get discouraged just keep at it & you will eventually have sucess, & when it comes the elation that will come over you when you call in your 1st predator is almost undescribable, best of luck to you & keep us all posted on your hunts.

  17. #17
    Member Gerberman's Avatar
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    Default wait a few minutes

    When you get to your stand, where you will be calling from, sit down, wait a few minutes, let the birds start making noise again, then begin calling with short bursts of sound, I will squeal three tones, wait, about a minute, repeat, call for about 10 minutes, After you get done calling, wait about 5 minutes, stand up slowly and be looking all around you, many times the predators sneak in and you will see them from a higher vantage point. Watch for movement and at close range they can be shot while running away. Gerberman

  18. #18
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    "If you want to be 1 of the best hunters of predators you need to go above & beyond what the next guys are doing & continue to learn & draw from all of your experiences" - predatorhuntr01

    You couldn't be more correct. We faced un-real coyote pressure in WA with hundreds and hundreds of guys going out thinking that by blowing through any random call, predators would respond. If you talk to any long time howler, they will be the first to tell you that your literally having multiple conversations with the dogs. You have to go above and beyond, you need to "be the dog" or "be the predator." Just going out and blowing a squeal, then a hare distress, then a squeaker, then an alert howl, then a food howl, or whatever random order, will pretty much make any educated predator laugh at you. Learn, learn, learn then go out and use it.

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