Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Any CoPilot or Browning BAR .338 Owners?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks in the future...
    Posts
    323

    Question Any CoPilot or Browning BAR .338 Owners?

    I have two possible future gun purchases I would like feedback on. The first one is a Browning BAR in .338 Winchester Magnum. How reliable are they? Accuracy at longer ranges, etc.?

    The next is the take down Wild West Guns "CoPilot". Neat looking package but would like to hear of accuracy, etc. from actual owners of these rifles, along with the previously mentioned BAR. The Copilot in .457 Magnum I heard can shoot .410 shotshells also? Is it the 3 inch shells? How are the patterns out of a rifled barrel? What is the accuracy of .45/70 rounds from the .457 Magnum compared to the dedicated .45/70 version? Thanks for the help!

  2. #2
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,599

    Default

    Most any 45/70 will chamber .410 shell but there are very different cases. If you think lead is a problem try getting wad plastic out of rifling.Except for the .410 thing they look like fun guns

  3. #3
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    1,382

    Default

    For reliable functioning a BAR must be kept CLEAN and lightly lubed. I've stripped and cleaned dozens of BARs that failed to feed, extract or eject because of excess silt, dirt, and fouling. The gas piston should be kept clean as it is a tight fit in the cylinder and the carbon fouling combined with a bit of moisture will make them very sticky or rusted, even though the cylinder is chrome plated. The bolt and carrier assembly should be kept free of dirt and dust or it will become sluggish on closing, causing failure to fire as it won't be fully forward and locked. When they cease to function most folks I've seen pour a bunch of oil in them which only makes it worse by creating a sludge. It's pretty easy to spend 1 1/2 hours stripping one down and detail cleaning all the parts to get it running again. It'll probably work great when it's new.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  4. #4
    Member The Kid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    1,089

    Default

    My experiance with the BAR mirrors Gunbugs', and I think they are a little on the heavy side as well. That being said they are usually a little more acurrate than the Remington autos.

    As far as the levergun, I have one and build alot of them, and in shooting mine and others I have never been dissapointed with the accuracy of 45-70 in the longer chamber. Also my 457 will shoot 350 and 405 grain 457mag and leverevolution 45-70 ammo into nearly the same hole at 100yds, requiring no change of zero. I have honestly never shot a single 410 shell through mine, though I have shot it through a couple of customers' guns, you won't win any skeet competitions with it but the pattern is sufficient to bag a grouse or rabbit at 10 or 15 yds.

  5. #5

    Default The Legend

    I have heard of people doing a conversion on a magnum 300 Win or 338 Win to 458 Win mag. You guys at WWG are the ultimate converters. Is this just a legend? Would this thing be possible? I can tell you it would be a good stopper and the BAR is heavy enough to suck in recoil. I think it would be a great gun for backing up stuff or going through brush.

    Sincerely,
    Thomas

  6. #6
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Grass Lake Michigan
    Posts
    1,978

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks in the future...
    Posts
    323

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by GrassLakeRon View Post
    Oh man that's awesome!!!!!

  8. #8
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Grass Lake Michigan
    Posts
    1,978

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by THE_HUNTERIAM View Post
    Oh man that's awesome!!!!!
    If you could only get one with an M14 style 20 round clip

    Ron

  9. #9
    Member Wyatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    PAQ
    Posts
    360

    Default

    I own a WWG in .457 and it does a good job for its intended purpose. I use it primarily as a back up gun for dangerous game and sometimes in remote areas while fishing, so 100 yard accuracy is all I need. Mine has a 16" barrel and I favor that over the take down models. Mine is always loaded with 405 gr. hard cast bullets and has never had a .410 shell run through it. I'm not sure what your intended use would be, but I think it and the Browning are odd choices if either would be your first Alaska gun. My choice would be a .30 cal or larger bolt action all weather rifle.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks in the future...
    Posts
    323

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wyatt View Post
    I own a WWG in .457 and it does a good job for its intended purpose. I use it primarily as a back up gun for dangerous game and sometimes in remote areas while fishing, so 100 yard accuracy is all I need. Mine has a 16" barrel and I favor that over the take down models. Mine is always loaded with 405 gr. hard cast bullets and has never had a .410 shell run through it. I'm not sure what your intended use would be, but I think it and the Browning are odd choices if either would be your first Alaska gun. My choice would be a .30 cal or larger bolt action all weather rifle.
    I will be most likely working afield with my Environmental Science Degree and wish for a collapsible large bore rifle for protection and hunting within 100 yards in thick brush areas. Now I am looking at a .338 Winchester Magnum stainless/synthetic bolt action rifle for longer shots. After hearing about BAR problems, looks like I will be sticking with bolt action. I had liked the idea of quick follow up shots of a self loader if I got in a tangle with a bear...

  11. #11
    Member Wyatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    PAQ
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Everyone has an opinion so take mine for what it's worth! Any gun you carry while working is going to take a beating. Very few large caliber rifles are available in true take down models and all I'm aware of are expensive. As an example, you can be in a WWG rifle 2k without too much trouble. When is the take down feature gonna pay for itself? Maybe if you used it exclusively as a survival plane gun, but to my thinking it's one more thing to fail and it costs something like $3-4 hundred more. It does you no good in 2 pieces while walking in the bush, so transportation size is the only plus to me. Why not chop a $300 lever gun or pick up a short barrel/stocked shotgun and spend the big money on a true hunting rifle. I prefer the .338WM as an all around caliber for Alaska and load mine with 250 gr. Swift A Frames for dangerous game, but there are many good calibers and rifle makers. If you go the WWG route, here is my .457 for reference. It is chopped to 16.5", kevlar stocked, ported, hard chromed, plus all the other typical WWG upgrades.


  12. #12
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,291

    Default Check out the Browning BLR Takedown

    Many calibers to choose from. Far easier to take apart than the Co-Pilot. My buddy chose the BLR over the Co-Pilot. I was impressed with Browning and ease of take down. GNG had them this past summer, was just there this morning and didn't really look for them, but they had a bunch of different Browning Rifles around the shop.

    Plus with the BLR they are mag fed, so can shoot popular rifle ammo and not flat points or Leverevolution ammo. I think that was the other reason the buddy chose the BLR takedown. Just another option to look into.

  13. #13
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Grass Lake Michigan
    Posts
    1,978

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by THE_HUNTERIAM View Post
    I will be most likely working afield with my Environmental Science Degree and wish for a collapsible large bore rifle for protection and hunting within 100 yards in thick brush areas. Now I am looking at a .338 Winchester Magnum stainless/synthetic bolt action rifle for longer shots. After hearing about BAR problems, looks like I will be sticking with bolt action. I had liked the idea of quick follow up shots of a self loader if I got in a tangle with a bear...

    You might read this first:www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/gtr152

    Ron

  14. #14
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GrassLakeRon View Post
    You might read this first:www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/gtr152

    Ron

    ron linky no worky
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  15. #15
    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    803

    Default Field Work

    Although my degree isn't in environmental sciences, I have spent quite a bit of time afield on the same projects that you might be working on. A couple of the companies I've worked for required that I carry.

    My experience is that you will find your rifle either slung over your back or leaning against a tree about 90% of the time. Taking notes and samples is a two handed business. As such, I've carried my .44 mag much much more than either my 12 ga or a rifle. If bears are serious issue, then I will typically work with a partner (also armed).

    If you want to try the rifle thing, you might consider just starting with a stock Guide Gun and if you find it useful, then spend the coin getting it modified. Frankly, most environmental companies will only let you carry bearspray anyways. If bears are a serious issue then they will hire bear guards.

    And for what it's worth, all the bear guards I've met so far have used short barreled 870's. A gun takes a terrific beating over the course of a field season in the bush, and 870's will always work and no great loss if they get dropped in the drink, ran over by a fourwheeler, etc.

    Just my opinions, do what you will.

    Yk

  16. #16

    Default

    I have a copilot 457 and it is very easy to disassemble and reassemble quickly. I have been surprised how accurate mine is with 45-70 ammo. I wouldn't hessiate to buy another. The 457 round is an absolute beast. I think its a good gun for the brush in bear country.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks in the future...
    Posts
    323

    Default

    Yeah I have a Remington 870, plus Saiga 12's so in the shotgun realm I am good. I just need large bore rifle. I also kayak and hike alot. The takedown size comes in handy at times, as I have found out by my takedown .22 rifles.

  18. #18
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Grass Lake Michigan
    Posts
    1,978

    Default

    The whole thing was a link:

    www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/gtr152

    Vince I believe you have read it but it might work for this situation.

    Ron

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •