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Thread: Guide Concession Program Article

  1. #1
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default Guide Concession Program Article

    Interesting article in Newsminer on the Guide Concession Program:
    http://www.newsminer.com/pages/full_...w_left_bullets

    I have to say that quotes in the article from Tiffany (who btw is an APHA member) are odd. No offense to Mr. Tiffany, but when the org he belongs to and supports has said publicly that the GCP would "substantially reduce" the number of guides on state lands, and he says, "
    I think the notion that it’s a broad sweeping cut of guides in Alaska is incorrect," it just seems like evermore spin to me.

    Also gotta love this:
    “We’re telling (guides) if this program isn’t implemented we could see an end to the guide and outfitter industry,” Fithian said. “The Board of Game is going to continue to place restrictions on the amount of non-resident opportunities.”

    This is (again) the part I don't get. If, as the article alludes, DNR will only award concessions to the guides who will not hire a bunch of assistants and have a plan that meets the harvest strategy F&G would like to see...won't that in effect reduce non-res opportunity from what it currently is? Isn't the GCP in effect a method of placing restrictions on non-res opportunity?

    And again APHA keeps harping on this "ending" or eliminating the guide industry, which I don't see ever happening. The BOG has said they may just cap all non-res opportunity for certain species at 10% opportunity, but nowhere have I ever seen any notion to eliminate the guide industry.

    And then we have this from Fithian:
    “If we keep limiting non-resident opportunities we’re going to have to figure out how we’re going to pay for our wildlife preservation programs,” Fithian said.

    Note the word choice used, "preservation," instead of the correct word, "conservation." And again it comes down to the fact that residents don't currently pay enough (imo) for hunting licenses, and that we also need to raise non-res license/tag fees to be more in line with what other western states charge.

    Again, this whole thing doesn't really add up when you look at what various folks are saying and have said. If indeed this is all about the resource, and that an unlimited # of guides/clients are overharvesting that resource (as is mentioned in the article), and that the GCP would effectively cut down on the number of guides (and clients), then how does that not restrict non-resident opportunity and the funding non-resident hunters provide?

    More quotes:
    Fithian, who chaired the committee that drew up the concession area boundaries and helped craft the scoring criteria, acknowledged the scoring criteria “has big failures in it” after DNR made changes to the committee’s version.

    “We have real concerns about selection criteria and we’re working (with DNR) to address that,” he said.

    Under the current scoring criteria proposal, guides would also be able to gain points by bidding on areas they wanted, an idea that even supporters of the proposal say is probably a bad one.

    “I don’t like that part,” Spraker, of the game board, said. “One guy with a lot of money or backers can really up his score by outbidding another guy. A guy could basically buy a hunt area.”

    I am really glad to see Ted Spraker voice opposition to the bidding process currently in the GCP plans. And hopefully that is something Fithian also opposes, though it isn't clear in the article what his concerns are exactly. I'd like to know if Fithian/APHA originally asked for a competitive bidding process, and just what changes DNR made that differ from what he/APHA proposed.

    I'd quote more but best to read the article. Kudos to Mowry for what I thought was a good piece on this.

    Happy New Year,


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    I think if the idea is to limit the number of guides, a pretty simple solution might be to require them to be residents. If nothing else, this keeps more money in the state.

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    i find alot of this interstesting and its easy to see how one person feels based on the bias they use in their thought process.
    They stated that since '94 the state watered down the guide license tests and were giving out 80-100 licenses each year, but there are only 680 licensed master/reg/asst guides out there. if what they say is true we should have over 1000 licensed guides that have been licensed SINCE ' 94!, not including those who already had a license.

    Also Tifany didn't think this program was a broad sweeping cut of the guide industry...what meetings has he been at? With the draft proposal set up the way it is...its a broad sweeping cut..this stuff about guys shuffling around and filling in the blank spots with all the federal areas, native land and concession areas is bogus. i know a hand full of guides that have three fed areas already, and some guys will have fed areas and maybe two concession areas, as well as the native land tracks inside those concession areas, but they make it soung like these are all seperate areas. but some native land, fed land and state concession land can be all in the same guide use area.

    And clark cox keeps playing it safe with the "all in draft form" response he's been giving for over a year now. Smartest answer i've seen yet. noncomittle and vague...par for the course.

    but like Tiffany said...compared to the other ideas out there....??
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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default Overall guide #s

    Jake,

    Dennis posted this in the other thread:
    As of Dec 2006, a full three years ago, our BGCSB released a paper reporting that...

    Licensed Alaskan Master Guide-Outfitters = 109 total licences
    Licensed Master Guide-Outfitters living in Alaska = 101
    Licensed Master Guide-Outfitters inving outside of Alaska = 08

    Licensed Alaskan Registered Guide-Outfitters = 536 total licences
    Licensed Registered Guide-Outfitters living in Alaska = 473
    Licensed Registered Guide-Outfitters living outside Alaska = 63

    Licensed Assistant guides =1239 total licenses
    Licensed Assistant Guides living in Alaska = 751
    Licensed Assistant Guides living outside Alaska = 486
    Licensed Assistant Guides living outside the US = 02 (nonresident aliens)

    Based on what I've been told, we currently have about 1800 guides overall, of which assistants make up the majority. And Clark said approx. 30% of guides are non-residents. Just pointing out that the 680 number you used isn't right, but don't know what the increase has really been since '94.

    Happy New Year,

  5. #5
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default Update fro 2006 to 2008

    Bushrat, brwnbr...and then I recently obtained numbers for the END of 2008. As of Dec 2008....

    Licensed Alaskan Master Guide-Outfitters = (111), an increase of 2
    Licensed Master Guide-Outfitters living in Alaska = (99), a decrease of 2
    Licensed Master Guide-Outfitters living outside of Alaska = (12), an increase of 4

    Licensed Alaskan Registered Guide-Outfitters = 510 total licenses , a decrease of 26
    Licensed Registered Guide-Outfitters living in Alaska = (404), a decrease of 39
    Licensed Registered Guide-Outfitters living outside Alaska = (106), an increase of 43

    Licensed Assistant guides = (1060 assistants + 166 class-A)
    Licensed Assistant Guides living in Alaska =(653 assistants+ 154 class-A)
    Licensed Assistant Guides living outside Alaska = (407 assistants + 12class-A)
    Licensed Assistant Guides living outside the US = (nonresident aliens) This would have to be searched by hand but 3 come to mind.

    In 2008 approx 312 Master or Registered guides were contracting hunts.

    In 2009, while difficult to count (for some reason), approx 320 MAster or Registered guides contracted hunts.

    Interesting note...that between 2006 and 2008 the number of Registered guides living outside of Ak increased by 43.
    But that the total number of Registered guides decreased by 26.

    *****Please note that these updated numbers for 2008 were obtained from and provided by the BGCSB in Dec 2009 through an Email.*****
    *****Original numbers for 2006 were obtained from a paper handout obtained at and provided by the BGCSB meeting in Anch AK, Dec 2006***

    *****And I was never able to obtain the number or percentage of CONTRACTING guides who live OUTSIDE the state of Alaska in my communications with BGCSB, so how did Clark or anyboby else come up with the 30% value????******


    Dennis

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    Member mit's Avatar
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    No Non-residents should have a Guide license. Seems pretty clear why. Didn't guides use to have areas assigned.. yes they did. Why did the practice end?
    Tim

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    ya 680 was the active contracting guides listed in the article...
    seems the the guides that aren't contracting...aren't the problem and shouldn't be used in the equation thats getting tossed back and forth.
    either way, what i'm getting at is, is the use of numbers to try and skew a viewpoint for ones purpose...
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    Default newsminor correction, and more...

    Yo mit,
    There are currently about 503 Registered and Master Guide/Outfitters who reside in Alaska.
    The vast, overwhelming majority of them agree with you that..."No Non-residents should have a Guide license". And many thousands of other resident Alaskans agree with you.
    This has been covered and discussed so many times that I don't even remember why it is an untouchable item. But it is. It will never change. It does not matter what I think, or what you think, or what anybody thinks. It ain't gonna change. It ain't gonna change unless you are some type of leglislator and know how to change them state laws, or whatever. I'm not trying to be a jerk here...not that I have ever been acccused of that. But in the last 12 years I have heard this "I think/I wish" stuff so many hundreds of times....that it ain't gonna happen. Oh yeah, I'm (only) a twenty++ year Alaskan who moved here for the hunting opportunities, and stayed here 100% for the hunting, rafting and guiding opportunities.

    ***And one correction directed toward the info in the Newsminor piece....***

    I believe the Newminor piece written by Tim Mowry said that "DNR is proposing to divide the state into 244 concession areas with a limited number of guides-usually one to four- for each area".

    This is INCORRECT. Actually, the DNR proposal will divide the state into (I believe) 166 concession areas with a limited number of guides awarded to operate in each area. As currently projected, there will be 244 "individual business opportunitues" within those 166 DNR Guide Concession Areas.

    And again, a contracting guide can only operate in three Guide Use Areas within AK in a cal year.
    DNR is proposing that a registered or master guide can "win" no more that two concession areas under the current plan.
    So in a "worst case situation", those 244 "business opportunities" could be gobbled up by as few as 122 business operators.

    And YES, I'm still opposed to the implimentation of this deal, which I have repeated about 100 times on this forum.

    Happy New Year!!! Just put the turkey in the oven...apple pies are just got done.

    Dennis

  9. #9
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default The 30% number is...

    ...the percentage of non-resident guides overall, for all categories. Got that info from DNR - ("30 % of the guides licensed in Alaska are from out of state").

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    Default Prob not important...

    ...it probably is not importatnt, but it does not surprise me that well over 400 nonresidents are licensed as Assistant Guides in Alaska.

    First of all...keep in mind that i am a very small owner-operator, guiding all my client-hunters myself, but..

    ...it is really hard to find Alaskans to work as assistants. It is much harder that one might think. (There we go, thinking again...)

    It is very easy to find guys who say they want to become assist guides.
    It is not as easy to find guys who really know what they are doing out there, who really know how to hunt kick-ass hard.
    It is not all that easy to find guys who will listen and learn.
    It is not easy to find guys who can effectively communicate with client-hunters.
    It is nearly impossible to find a guy who knows how to hunt kick-ass hard, who will listen to instruction, who can communicate and entertain a client-hunter and WHO IS AVAILABLE FOR A FULL MONTH or more of seasonal guide work.
    Many potentially great assistant guides either work full-time jobs, or have "significant others" who convince them to stay home for months at a time, as opposed to go off guiding for months at a time.
    Yes, it is easy to find guys who can not do any of that stuff who are available for months of potential, yet seasonal, assistant guide work.

    So, Alaska has a relitively small pool of potential assistant guides, whether qualified or not. We, Alaska and Alaskans, are a small pool of potentials.
    "Outside" has an unbelievable huge pool, perhaps 1000 times larger then AK, of potential assistant guides, qualified or not.
    It does not surprise me that from within that unbelievable hugh pool of potential "outside" assistant guides that Alaska has licensed 422 (assistant guides & class-A) assistants from outside, as opposed to 807 (assistant & class-A) from within AK.

    Oddly, in the five camps I worked as an assistant, employing perhaps 30 assistants, I can only think of three assistant guides who were not Alaskans residing in AK.

    ...for what it is worth...

    dennis

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    Default jobs

    Alaskatrueadventures I have heard from guides in AK, that most registered guides dont want to hire Alaskans as they feel they are just training competition for them-self down the road, but feel its less likely with nonresidents?? Finding suitable guides is the biggest challenge facing outfitters today. Our season is 3 months, so if yours is only 30 days I can see how that would make it harder. Most registered guides make the mistake of trying to cut costs in one area where they should be happy to spend big, and that is the assistant guides wages. Ive been doing it a long time and some guys are still trying to pay what we were getting 20 years ago! A good guides wages should start at 250 a day and go up to 300 pretty fast if hes real good but most will skimp on wages then wonder why they cant get good reliable guys! I have been guiding for the same outfit since the early 90s, there are 4 of us on the crew who have been there over 15 years now and no kidding we will make more in tips than a lot of guides get paid! Our average tip for a 7 day moose hunt is 1500 US. Not telling this to brag, just trying to illustrate that clients are willing to pay for good guides.

  12. #12
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Exclamation season length

    Yukon,

    Our hunting and guide season is very roughly four months long.

    May-brown bears
    Aug-sheep
    Sep-bears and moose and caribou
    Oct brown bears

    Guide-Outfitters in AK are generally happy with a month of seasonable availability. Two is great and three months of availability is super-sensational.

    I have never heard anybody say they did not want to hire Alaskan residents because that would be "growing competition".
    I have, many times, heard them say that they have a very difficult time trying to find quality assistants within AK. I'm sure that you will agree with me on this point...To a contracting guide-outfitter, his crew of assistants is just as important as his client-hunters. Forward thinking guide-outfitters spend a lot of time throughout the year keeping their assistant-crew aligned with them. It's like any other relationship, including marriage....you better pay attention to your honey/assist guide crew, or somebody else will.

    I have heard that guide-outfitters say that those starved out of business by the DNR Guide Concession program would be welcomed back into the pool of available assistants. Prominent big-time Master Guide Dennis H. announced that at the Anch public DNR informational meeting in Dec '09, and made zero friends among those concerned with starvation. This political mess continues to build larger walls between the guide community.

    I am not saying you heard anything wrong or inaccurate. I am saying that we speak with different folks.

    Later today I'll post some observations about this "competitive bid" nightmare, including the "offers of corporate financial assistance" that little ol me have already received.

    Sorry about the double message during my edit process.

    Dennis

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    Yukon,

    Our hunting and guide season is very roughly four months long.

    May-brown bears
    Aug-sheep
    Sep-bears and moose and caribou
    Oct- brown bears

    Guide-Outfitters in AK are generally happy with a minimum month of availability. Two is great and three months of availability is super.

    I have never heard anybody say they did not want to hire Alaskan residents because that would be "growing competition" for the future. i have often been with contracting guide-outfitters who were scrambling at the end of summer to line up one more assistant. Frankly, is $500.00 to $1000.00 cheaper to hire Alaskans. Nobody really wants to pay an assistants air-travel to Ak from ?Kansas?. Seriously, do you know anybody in any industry who watches their money any closer than a guide-outfitter?

    I have heard that guide-outfitters say that those starved out of business by the DNR Guide Concession program would be welcomed back into the pool of available assistants. Prominent big-time Master Guide Dennis H. announced that at the Anch public DNR informational meeting in Dec '09.

    I am not saying you heard anything wrong or inaccurate. I am saying that we speak with different folks.

    Dennis
    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    Yukon,

    Our hunting and guide season is very roughly four months long.

    May-brown bears
    Aug-sheep
    Sep-bears and moose and caribou
    Oct brown bears

    Guide-Outfitters in AK are generally happy with a month of availability. Two is great and three months of availability is super-sensational.

    I have never heard anybody say they did not want to hire Alaskan residents because that would be "growing competition".

    I have heard that guide-outfitters say that those starved out of business by the DNR Guide Concession program would be welcomed back into the pool of available assistants. Prominent big-time Master Guide Dennis H. announced that at the Anch public DNR informational meeting in Dec '09, and made zero friends among those concerned with starvation. This political mess continues to build larger walls between the guide community.

    I am not saying you heard anything wrong or inaccurate. I am saying that we speak with different folks.

    Dennis

    figured it was important enough for Dennis to post twice... so i wanted to make sure no one missed it
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default question on contracting hunts

    Based on the data, a little less than half of the master/registered guides who can contract out hunts do so, and so it works out that roughly 20% of all guides overall are contracting all the hunts.

    Would imagine not all licensed guides are working, but still it does seem odd that so few are contracting all the guided hunts in Alaska. And since it's required to meet with clients in the field, I'd like to get info from you guides on how that all works, and if contracting guides are booking hunts for others and just taking a percentage, or how they are able to really meet all clients in the field.

    Also would like to hear the opinions of guides on whether or not we need to, or should, get back to mandating that contracting guides actually guide, and if that would solve any of the problems we are having. It would seem if a contracting guide sets up a base camp and funnels all clients into this base camp ("in the field") before farming them out to assistants, that means he/she could put more clients in the field, but if he/she was forced to guide some clients it wouldn't be possible to meet all the clients in the field, cuz he or she wouldn't be at base camp all the time.

    I confess that most all of the guides I know personally are contracting guides who actually guide clients every year. They typically have from zero to three assistants, but the contracting guide is out there guiding and not always available in base camp.
    Thanks,

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default

    contacting guides should guide...maybe a certian percentage of their yearly contracted hunts just to meet a minimum.

    limiting the number of assitants someone can employ at once, or just limiting their land use permit to X number of clients rather than cutting everyones legs out from under them would be a more viable approach than exclusive/semi exclusive areas.

    As for guides meeting with clients in the field...the definetion of field is a flexable line to some outfitters i belive.
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    Default asst.

    ATA yes I would agree the assistant guides and crew are very important to any good operation, clients will typically spend 99.9% of their time with the assistant NOT the contracting guide/outfitter so their opinion of the quality of the hunt will be based on the ability of the assistant. It just amazes me that this fact is lost on so many outfitters. You raised some good points on quality's good assistants need, good communication skills as well as being somewhat informed on current events as well as a good understanding of the game in the area are all important as is great work ethics of course, most of all IMO you have to love doing it. I have seen guides come out to camp without a clue as to what was expected of them, and they are sometimes shocked to learn! Everything from doing dishes to proper capeing and everything in between has to be done, I have put in so many 16 hour days guiding I have lost count, to get guys now that will do that and do it well with a good attitude the contracting guide better be prepared to pay well in the end his business depends on it. The internet just in the last few years has changed the industry considerably too... the news of bad hunts get around fast and hunters are very well connected to each other now. Hope you guys up there can work out a good solution for all! IMO outfitting is the truest form of renewable resource that we have. I have spent over 25 years in the industry now and have been able to raise 3 kids doing it and fishing/hunting is all Ive done. would like it to be there for others, its the greatest life there is.

  17. #17
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default Lets talk about the BID...

    ...cold out today...my snowshowing workout was almost unpleasant...never warmed up when i got into the gym...

    ...I'm not sure if the recent discussion on assistant guides really relates to the Newsminor article...sorry for my partial hijacking...

    OK!
    Time to take a few minutes and discuss the bid, the proposed bid process, and info in the Newsminor article.
    I have tried to follow this process from way before it became public. The guys who initiated it like their money. They are not afraid to spend money to make money. But they prefer to make it and not pay it out. All of that is easy to understand.

    When this deal started, I really do not believe that anybody anticipated that a guide concession area would "cost" a minimum of $3000.00. I honestly do not believe that any of those that initiated this deal ever anticipated that a competitive bid process would ever be introduced. And throughout the formal planning process in the past year it was generally understood that each concession area would cost a flat rate. Many times the value discussed was $2000.00 per concessioin area. And at one point early in the process somebody said or figured out that if concession areas "sold" for $1000.00 each that DNR would not be losing money, as compared to the current and past process, and would be making more. But 2K per area was often discussed.

    Currently, and in the past, a guide-outfitter could obtain a commercial use permit for a $1000.00 yearly fee. Some mobile operators could legally get by with a $500.00 commercial use permit. And with that $1000.00 (or $500.00) permit a guide-outfitter could operate in one, two or three different locations or guide use areas (GUAs).

    So when the $2000.00 value started being thrown around that was alarming. But it was discussed and understood that it would probably be a flat rate for everybody, and for all concession areas. Everbody just figured they would build that expence into the cost of their hunts.

    But now DNR has upped the projected expense to a minimum bid of $3000.00 per concession area. So what used to cost $1000.00 (or $500.00) for 1 to 3 opereating areas, will now cost a minimum of $3000.00 for one concession or $6000.00 for two cconcession areas. This alone effectively knocks the tiny guide-outfitter business out of the game (which was one of the unspoken but very real goals of those that initiated this deal).

    So now lets look at a few sentences from the Newsminor article....

    The article says... Under the current scoring criteria proposal, guides would also be able to gain points by bidding on areas they wanted, an idea that even supporters of the proposal say is probably a bad one.

    “I don’t like that part,” Spraker, of the game board, said. “One guy with a lot of money or backers can really up his score by outbidding another guy. A guy could basically buy a hunt area.”

    Letarte agreed, ““To me that opens the door for outside money to come in.”

    But Thompson said the application is structured so that guides can’t “buy their way in.” Guides would only get a certain number of points for a maximum bid in an area. The state does the same thing with timber, gas and mining resources, he said. In areas that generate the most interest, it makes sense to have some sort of bidding process, he said.

    “The decision is not going to be made by how much money somebody provides state but the state does have to get a return,” Thompson said.

    (AlaskaTrueAdventure Note...that the last sentences came from DNR Southcentral Manager Rick Thompson.)

    My interpretation of this is that DNR has now entered the world of GREED.
    Now, many/most/all these bids, already inflated to a minimun of $3000.00 each, will "sell" for even more. Again, a small outfit can't pay more and still produce a sustaining profit.

    And please remember that this program is being sold as a way of keeping the best guide-outfitters working. So how does a higher bid/cost insure that "the best of the best" obtain concession areas and remain working as great stewards of the land??? (...smoke and mirrors?)

    And here comes a silly little twist...that everybody predicted.
    I have been contacted by a hunt-booking-agent, and offered substancial financial assistance for the competitive bid process! If I agree, and I (probably) will not, the hunt-booking-agent will sell my hunts and then be paid back for his investment in me by keeping a larger percentage of the fees paid by the client-hunter.

    So while this is completely against my style, ethics, and standard operating procedures...it is already happening! While I will decline, others will accept. And that, team, is how outside money will get introduced into the competitive bid process!

    And even though the concession area initiators never anticipated any substancial cost increases, here is another gem.

    Many guide-outfitters have negociated "tresspass agreements" with native landowners in Alaska. And many of these native landowners have began to figure out that they have been selling the tresspass agreements incredibilly low. And their fees are rising sharply. Again, this is just another example of how this entire process has affected the guide-outfitter community, and caused increaseing costs of future hunts for client-hunters.

    Dennis

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    The funny thing is I think the “guide” who went past Mr. Tiffany on horses this fall was not a guide at all just a couple of residents hunters. They were not after the same sheep anyways just taking a short cut over the top.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Arrow

    And here comes a silly little twist...that everybody predicted.
    I have been contacted by a hunt-booking-agent, and offered substancial financial assistance for the competitive bid process! If I agree, and I (probably) will not, the hunt-booking-agent will sell my hunts and then be paid back for his investment in me by keeping a larger percentage of the fees paid by the client-hunter.

    So while this is completely against my style, ethics, and standard operating procedures...it is already happening! While I will decline, others will accept. And that, team, is how outside money will get introduced into the competitive bid process
    Dennis ...



    welcome to politics...


    i deal daily with corporate America and the regulations they feel that as a service provider i need to ad hear too... and those formula's of piracy just do not work in AK so i am bound to push back and educate them...

    while i also compete with unscrupulous company's whose entire process is set up to fleece the clients of lots of money...

    the point?

    Dennis, and any other guide with morals take heed...


    1 ... do not cut your own throats....if this GCP DOES NOT happen it will have come very close by the time it fails so no loss...

    2... personal ethical morals will cause you to slit your wrist and bleed out a slow painful death with no work or guiding ability...

    ?????

    3... the very Guides we are all concerned about will in-fact take the favor an make and spend $$$$$$$$BANK!$$$$$$$$$$ thus ensuring you will loose out..


    welcome to BUSINESS ONE 0 ONE !!!!!

    if you have the ability to fend for your self all the way through great..

    if your like every other limp-checkbook in the country.. you can not... booking agents will pay your bills and keep you in business if that is what it takes to maintain a quality, honest and fruitful business....

    one must ensure there own contract to stay in business and work from there... you know dang well ... the others are already seeking sponsors.. just cause that is who and what they are. if your values are already too high to compete.. then.. i would not spend a lot fighting this plan at all.. as you will be out income that will have to see you through as you re-educate and adjust...

    the values of an honest man.. paying back loans are so much more worthwhile then the inept adn corrupt business chain that will otherwise spawn from this mess.....
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Coffman Cove, POW, Alaska
    Posts
    753

    Default Guide Wages

    Yukon, the asst guide wages sound good but I fear that's not the really the reality. Here is a job posting on the APHA site:

    Master guide seeking the services of an individual desiring employment in the Alaska guide industry as an apprentice guide.


    Terms of employment are as follows:
    1.) Applicant must be an Alaska resident in his or her mid-twenties and must be looking for a possible career in the Alaska guide industry.
    2.) Applicant must able bodied and willing to sign a contract that spells out the terms of their employment that states a commit to a 60 day trail period of employment... Sept. and Oct... and with any future employment based on the performance of the applicant during the contracted period.
    3.) Base pay $100 per day plus tips. Travel costs included in the pay.

    Where I guide we don't make anywhere near that, I do it for a little income and the fun of it (also my boss rocks really). So if anyone is looking for a stellar asst guide, moose/bear/deer/caribou experience and pays $250 per day I will jump ship in an instant!

    Gooch
    Mike
    www.coffmancoveak.com
    Prince of Wales Island

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