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Thread: First hunt stories needed!

  1. #1
    Premium Member denalihunter's Avatar
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    Thumbs up First hunt stories needed!

    So I was sitting here, thinking I have till March to wait for the draws to come out, and for some reason my mind wandered to my first successful harvest of a big game animal, probably cause I'm still trying to get my 6 yr old a caribou this winter. Then I thought, wow, i'd sure like to hear others stories about thier first big game harvest!

    When I was 7, my dad and i were on a Columbia Blacktail hunt in the coastal rainforests of Washington State. I had passed all of his tests over the previous 5 years, and spent a lot of time packing a toy wooden gun in the woods while he continuously corrected me on the proper way to handle a gun, so I was ready!

    He set me up on a stump before daybreak, and he moved off about 50 yards and did the same. I remember thinking he was too far away from me, and it was chilly this fine morning. I looked down at the 30-30 Buffalo Bill commemortive in my hands thinking "I sure wish something would step out".

    About 45 minutes later, I caught movement in the trees about 100 yards away, moving in my general direction. My heart started pounding, and I grabbed that old rifle tighter... As the movment started to materialize, I noticed it was a deer, and it had some hardware on the skull.... Now I'm really excited. I slowly look around for the old man, and he's facing the other way, a puff of smoke rising above his signature black stocking cap, and I realize I'm alone on this hunt....

    The buck moves closer, picking brush, and popping his head up now and again to look around. At about 60 yards, the deer stops, and intently looks past me and at my dad, probably catching the movement of the smoke on this still morning.

    I pull up the heavy octogon barrell, and take aim. The deer is broadside, and doesn't catch my movement. Taking aim, I squeeze the trigger.... the deer takes a leap and falls in the thick grass in the area....

    After catching my breath, and not being positive what has happened, I look over my shoulder to see my dad running over at first with a look of concern, but once he seen me smiling, he was whooping it up. I pointed the spot where he fell, and we quickly walked over to find a nice forked horn buck.

    I'll never forget that day, as it is as clear in my mind today as it was on the day it happened.

    What's your story???

    Claude
    Experience Real Alaska! www.alpinecreeklodge.com

  2. #2
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Cool First Deer

    My father was not a hunter so I grew up reading Outdoor Life and Fur-Fish-Game and dreaming. He was a very good man though and helped me chase my dreams as best as he could.
    So, at age 14 I had bought a used Rem 870/28inch mod barrel - bead sights and after buying some slugs I was ready to be a deer huinter! A cousin of mine that was 16 lived about 100 miles away and his dad worked in a heavily wooded coal strip mine. The miners were alowed to hunt so my cousin and I had a place to go.
    This was 1970 and deer in IL were not overly abumdant yet. My cousin had a little experience so I followed his advice and we set up on the edge of a small standing corn field. Late morning we could not sit still any longer and took a walk inside the first few rows of corn. As we walked along a small 8 point buck just walked out in front of us about 15 yards away. We both raised and fired and the buck did a backflip and died quickly! Upon examining the buck it only had 1 hole - funny it was where I was aiming yet my bigger cousin claimed it was his hit?
    We drug it out and my uncle came and took it home while we went back out after lunch and set up again near the field. Midafternoon a fat 6 pointer came walking by about 50 yards away in some brush and I put the whack on him! We drug him out and were two very happy lads!
    Two days later I found out what poisen ivy was when both my eyes swelled shut and I missed two weeks of school! I had a shot of somekind everyday for a week if memory serves me!
    A wonderful memory that I still can relive!

  3. #3
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    I was 12 years old. I was hunting in southeast Idaho with my dad and his brother. Dad dropped down into the draw leaving myself and my uncle up on the ridge. I picked up a huge non-typical antler(8 or 9 points, massive).
    I carried it up the ridge with me until we stopped for a snack. when we stopped, I placed the antler atop a small juniper bush. As we were completing our snack I hear something coming out of the draw to us. It was a small doe which I harvested with one shot from my 30-30.
    Several years later I stood next to the bush-which had become a tree-and peered inside. The antler is still there tangled within the trunk of the tree. I have, in the years since, shown this antler to all of my children. the tree is now about 20 feet tall but the antler remains shoulder high.

  4. #4
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    I've been in and out of the woods since I was a kid, but my first major success came with my first moose. My first Koyukuk trip in 2003. I remember it very well, just as we were pulling out of Fairbanks to hit the Haul Rd they made an announcement over the radio that Johnny Cash had just died - September 12th. Not a very positive start to the trip but that's life. After several hours of hill climbing we made it into PS3 at around 4am. Colder than a well diggers ass. Below freezing, I remember putting on almost all the warm gear I brought - Not expecting it to be so cold.

    Anywho...transferred gear to the boats and readied to launch the boats down the ramp as the sun was coming up. Brisk 27*, we watched a motorhome slide down the ramp from water that had dripped off other trailers then froze...no traction until the rear tires were in the water.

    1.5 days later we were home for the next 10 days - Upper reaches of the Koyukuk. We set camp and were finished early afternoon. My dad, his partner and I headed out to scout the areas. Not long after leaving I narrowly spotted a cow in the woods. We tied off and spot/stalk a few hundred years while calling and getting some very generous grunts in return. Found 3 bulls and several cows rounded up on the edge of a small pond, hiding in willows. After minutes of calling the largest of the 3 showed himself. I threw my rifle onto my head and teetered back and forth to mimic a challenging bull. After sizing him up we estimated just over 60". Got within 60 yards and harvested him. Took 3 shots - I will say buck fever was runnin wild but I did the job.

    Decided to open him up and let him cool as dark was setting in. The following day we finished the job. 3 hours later and a short pack, we were back in camp havin Jack n Coke.

    Successful or not it's still been the best hunt of all times. My first moose and I was able to share that with my dad.

    61"
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  5. #5
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWB View Post
    61"
    i suppose your gonna tell us next you caught it with that fly rod... SO???????..... what line did you use
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  6. #6
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    i suppose your gonna tell us next you caught it with that fly rod... SO???????..... what line did you use
    No sir. Just a convenient place to hang it at the time. When my wall wasn't tall enough to hang the mount, it was in the garage used as a hat/coat rack.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  7. #7
    Member The Kid's Avatar
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    Default I guess I'll tell mine

    I had hunted with my dad and uncles since I was about 4yrs old and had been harvesting birds pretty regularly during that time, but my deer hunting was severly hampered by lack of a suitable rifle. I had toted a muzzleloader that was wayyyy too heavy for me to use effectively and also tried a 410 with slugs finding it to be less than optimum for deer shooting. About 3 days before season was to open the year I turned 9 my dad says to me " hey great Grandad has a rifle you mite be able to borrow since he doesn't hunt anymore", a call to my Granddad confirmed this, Idon't know why we hadn't thought of it 2 years earlier, but he said he would go out to pick it up.
    He came home with an old but well cared for Remington 760 Gamemaster in 244 Remington, with an old 6x scope and a whopping 6 corroded old green shells. I rubbed most of the green stuff off the shells and we went to the ranch the next day to shoot, sure enough it was still zeroed after 25yrs in the closet. After locating 2 boxes of ammo, all that was available within 40 miles of home, I was in business.

    I hunted with Dad every day for the first weekend and we just weren't seeing the deer we normally did, so I was getting a little discouraged. A quick call to the guy with the neighboring ranch got us the go ahead to hunt on his place the next day and we planned to set on his wheat field after work and school. We headed out with no supper to get there in time, 9 yr olds are usually in a hurry it seems. As we made our way down the draw towards the field Dad held me up saying that he had spotted a deer on the hill above us. We quickly sat down and glassed this mystery deer confirming it was a buck, and we were pretty sure it had the required 3inches of antler to make it a legal buck. After we saw that it did indeed make the cut Dad said to just wait, as he was calmly feeding toward us and was unaware of us. I don't think I have to tell you how nervous a young kid can get in 10 minutes of waiting for his first buck to walk out, I was sweating bullets!

    When at last he came back into view he was all of 7 yes 7yds from us, a which point I let him have it. He dropped like a rock, and I yelled " I got him Dad", at which time my father pointed out to me that my buck was trying to rise to his feet and I needed to do the right thing and give him a finisher. I very unsteadily managed to shoot him in the base of the neck and put his suffering to a quick end, nearly missing from 5yds I was so nervous. Me and Dad set down and he told me how proud he was of me and that he thought we should say a quick prayer. Sitting on my Dad's knee hugging him and thanking the Good Lord for my harvest is one of my fondest memories from my childhood.

    I was taught alot about hunting that day, from being proud of your harvest even when it is a barely legal forkhorn, to field dressing, and sharing meat with a gracious landowner, and spending time with loved ones, to the plain and simple fact that every young boy needs a deer rifle. And with my occupation I see to it that all of my younger cousins and any other young person that I see fit get their own rifle.

  8. #8
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Default Hey Kid

    great first animal and a great writeup. Especially the part about thanking the Lord. Something I've done on my harvests. May the Lord Bless you with good health and more memories in the New Year.

  9. #9
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    Default Well its a long story......

    Thanksgiving Day 1979 found me and my dad deer hunting in the cold woods of Virginia. In the early morning pitch black darkness Dad placed me at the base of a pine tree, he described the area I was hunting:

    "To your right about twenty yards is a fence line on the edge of a corn field. In front of you about fifty yards the fence line turns right at the corner of the field. I'll be in the woods on the far side of the field about two hundred yards away. If you shoot a deer and it runs into the brush, don't make any noise, just listen to see where it goes."

    With that, he left, and I settled into the cold morning. Huddling into my thin jacket and clutching my boltaction mossburg 20 guage to try and gather some sort of warmth from it. I was very cold, couldn't stop shivering.

    As the morning darkness started to change into the gray morning light that awakens the forest, I heard a shotgun blast from off to my front right, the first was quickly followed by a second. Then silence.

    My heart was pumping with excitement and expectation. Then I heard my father call for me, I answered, he said to get up and walk to the corner of the field, turn right and come through the woods toward him.

    About ten paces after I rounded the corner of the field, still about twenty yards inside the woodline, I spotted horns! They were poking up from behind a rock in front of me and instead of pointing up, they were sideways! Im my nine year old mind, I had found a sleeping deer!

    I tiptoed as quiet as I could to the rock, stepped up onto it, and behold before me was a huge eight pointer, sleeping! I slipped the gun off safe, wondering where the best place to shoot was, I figured, between the ears. So I slowly (so's not to wake him) lowered my barrel to within inches of his head, right between the horns and started to gather the slack on the trigger.

    Just as I could feel the trigger starting to break I hear a noise in front of me and looked up to see my fatehr coming through the woods. He seen what I was intending and quickly said stop. To that I placed a finger over my mouth and said "Shhhh, he's sleeping!"

    Of course, my father laughingly agreed with me, but explained we didn't need to be quiet because he was dead a sleep. He of course had fired the two shots at the buck and was following the blood trail to him. The intent of calling me was an attempt to push the deer back or get a finishing shot.

    After explaining that he said for me to go to shis spot while he took the deer to the truck. He described the general area of his spot and said it was a pine tree with leaves pushed back far enough to stand by.

    So off I went.

    I found a pine tree ion the general area he described with some leaves away from the base, and took up a stand. Shivering in the cold with my shotgun tucked under my arm, I was mad about dad getting "my" buck. All of a sudden I heard a crashing and looked up to a big doe bouncing through the woods. As she ran i pulled the shotgun up, slide the safety off, aimed and nothing! The gun wouldn't fire! The doe stopped looked at me, and started eating acorns. While she wasn't looking I opened the bolt, made sure it was loaded,it was. Checked and made sure the safety was all the way off, it was. Tried to shoot her again and the gun wouldn't shoot! I stood there looking at her mad as could be for two or three minutes until she walked off.

    I stood there wondering what could have gone wrong, check all the steps again and again. Nothing. I knew what to do, I had already been hunting a couple years for squrriel and rabbit and had shot several of each. Shortly my dad came walking back. He had forgotten his thermos of coffee and wanted a drink on the cold drag back.

    The first thing he asked was, why are you at this tree? His spot was another fifty yards ahead. Then he asked if I had seen anything. My response" "Yeah but this gun don't work anymore." Then explained what had happened. He said hold your gun up like you did. When I did he started laughing. Madly I looked at him in confusion, he said, "Look where your finger is" I looked and my thickly gloved finger was hugging the outsiude of the trigger guard. Ooops!

    So we moved to his spot and thermos of coffee. Oh how good that coffee was after such a long cold morning already. I drank two cups before he left. Of course what happens five minutes after drinking hot coffee on a cold day, yeap, bladders over filled. I leaned my gun in the joint of the tree and an old hog wire fence that was hammered into the tree. Got up and stepped to the opposite side of the tree and relieved myself. As I sat back down I reached for the gun and came face to face with a deer!

    We were nose to nose with the gun and hog wire in between us. Just inches apart. My mind was racing what do I do? The deer bolted running along the fence. I scrambled to my feet gun in left hand biting my glove off my right. Clicked it off safety. The deer jumped to my side of the fence and ran about ten paces and stopped. I had been tracking it since it jumped the fence and as soon as it stop I fired. The deer hit the ground, jumped up as I cycled the bolt and ran an arching patteern to the heacy brush in front of me and disappeared. I hear splashing in water and leaves being kicked around in a diminishing sound.

    Then nothing.

    Then I heard my father call. Ralph!? I remebered his instruction of to be quiet if I fired, so I didn't answer.

    Another Ralph!?

    No answer,

    RALPH!

    No answer,

    RALLLPPHH!

    Yeap, you guessed it, No answer,

    RALLPH, RALLPPHH, RALLLPPPHHH!!!!!!!


    The woods came alive with the sounds off brush busting, leaves kicking, branches breaking, and all sounds a grown man makes running as fast as he can through the woods, until he broke into view. He then turned shades of red beyond red, he was purple! Ooops, maybe I should have answered.

    BOY DIDN"T YOU HEAR ME CALLING YOU????

    Gulp, uh um, Ye Yes Sir.

    The why didn't you answer me?

    Well because, YOU said, if I ever shot a deer and it ran off not to make any noise.

    So you shot a deer, where did it go?

    Over there (pointing to the right)

    Stay here

    OK, (Glad I wasn't getting my behind warmed up)

    He walked about five steps into the heavy brush and called me. I walked over to him and seen my deer, piled up on the far side of a stream with all the leaves kicked off the bank. The splashing and leaves I had hear were the deer laying not forty feet from me going through it death throws in the stream.

    I was no longer cold.

  10. #10
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    Default I can't

    The statue of limitations hasn't ran out and all i will say it involves a white 74 Blazer my dad was driving...

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    Quote Originally Posted by 323 View Post
    The statue of limitations hasn't ran out and all i will say it involves a white 74 Blazer my dad was driving...
    323- don't know if chevies count, but...

    My dad did kill a ten pointer with a javlin. A 1974 AMC Javlin moving at 70 miles per hour.

    He had it mounted and told everyone he used a spear. The looks of amazement and disbelief he got until he explained the story were always funny.

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