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Thread: Lanyard on your handgun

  1. #1
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    Question Lanyard on your handgun

    How many of you guys have a lanyard on your handgun and why? I can see where it might be handy to have it tied to your wrist in the tent sleeping at night incase crazy things happen in the dark but why else?

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    i have considered that a few time snyd.... having dropped my hand gun out of a holster lost clips out of the buts... etc... i have looked at a shoulder loop to secure it to me...
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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Depends on the holster I'm using but after watching a Glock bounce a long dang way down a scree slope I think they're a good idea.

    A guide type holster on the chest with some kind of retention is OK "as-is" and I'm liking those better all the time. Any kind of hip holster combined with activity like hiking, scrambling, climbing, etc I like a lanyard with- nothing fancy, just a loop of cord clipped on the butt and around the shoulder.

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    I know of guys that use one with the idea that if they were ever knocked down by a bear in a deffensive situation they wouldn't get seperated from their gun.
    Vance in AK.

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    If we are invaded by the Chinese, maybe
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    Default lanyard

    in the old days lanyards were comon on guns and knives.
    full shielded holsters prevent accidental loss. If there is a chance you have to run, assuming everthing is going to stay in place is a big mistake.
    Plan for the worst /hope for the best. If the clip release can easily be triggered and loose clips , releave the holser in the area of the release button.practice running with the gun in place and know what it is going to do or not do .
    Two places I prefir the pistol. On the calf, or a chest pac. The chest pac is best.Not on the hip. It is quickest to slip the hand through the lanyard over the grip, pop the cover strap and draw. with practice it is one smoothe motion.
    Imagine accidentily rolling down a hill to with in just a few feet of a bear,your rifle is some where else, where is your side arm ?

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    Back in the day I guess you would say now we used the lanyard for shooting stability. With the right lanyard you can set up in a very good isosceles triangle.

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    i don't use a lanyard. i don't see a need for one. have only used one for an M9 in the military. but even then it is not required. i can see if you're doing stuff that involves a lot jogging, climbing over stuff, etc (like some in the military do). when very active doing these things, with an okay amount of noise around you, one probably couldn't tell their gun fell out of the holster unless it was dragging next to them on a lanyard.

    i don't see a need for one in cc/open carry or in the alaska wilderness.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arleigh View Post
    Imagine accidentily rolling down a hill to with in just a few feet of a bear,your rifle is some where else, where is your side arm ?


    Out of curiosity, have you spent much time around bear?

    The situation that you propose is one that I do not envision happening very frequently (for mankind). If carrying a revolver, a simple hammer wrap seems effective enough for quads, hiking, and horseback riding.

    The last thing I would want in a life and death situation is a potential entanglement hazard between me and my strongest defense.

    If you are descending from 140 where a swim may be involved, securing your sidearm is probably a good idea...

    If you are going for a walk that may result in packing game or fishing rods, probably not...
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    Default Mountainous terrain maybe...

    a good option to have. Boy, that image in Hodgeman's post is convincing- You could clip in at start of the climb - as needed basis esp if not using retention strap/thumbbreak. In the brush though, or on streams, I prefer as few straps and snags as possible, but do use a retention strap.

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    I have to admit all my bear encounters were involintary , either while camping or in a search&rescue atmosphere and twice at our home. I have never encountered bear during a hunt. Ever hike in a narrow canyon stream bed,that is so loud that you cannot hear anything but the stream, then all of a sudden just to your left is a crash of brush ploughing it's way up a hill, and that bear is in the same stream bed and all whom are with you are unarmed ? A few of our searches went just that way. rescue people do not always have the skills of a hunter,ony a rare few. those I was among.out of 25, there were 3 whom I could rely on in the wood. I find that very few people,though trained, use the skills provided them. A few are prepared for the unexpected.
    So after years of watching after people stumbling in the brush falling in streams and hilll sides,observing all the dumb things people do in the wood ,I figured I have the expirence to recomend what I did. I used to use a shoulder holster, or a chest pac which also had my radio. It's just my opinion.
    Most of the folks here I expect are very skilled hunters and woods-men,and take the to the wood like their own back yard with the respect it deserves. But even the best of them have to admit having made a blunder or two ,in spite of all their expirence.

  12. #12

    Default Arleigh

    has your S&R been mostly in California? If so, no fears; the black bears in California only eat Tofu.

  13. #13

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    I experimented with them in my horse days. All I can say is, they might be great for the plains and deserts of the world, but fuggedabout using them in brush. Anyone ever played with a garrote? Around your own neck? You got the picture.

  14. #14

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    Well, some of the frogman I worked with attached a lanyard from the pistol to their pants somewhere. Thought was they could dump everything, if they had to, and still retain the pistol.

    We were required to connect the lanyard to our M9's while in Iraq. I think the thought was to keep pistol snatchers from grabbing and running. My biggest fear was dropping the M9 in the porta potty or burn out, the lanyard eased my retrieval anxiety.

    Some boarding parties and other shipboard watches used to require a lanyard to keep the pistols from going into the drink.

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    When I was a kid I knew a guy that lost his 4 and 5/8 Colt single action every time we went out horseback. It would fall out of his holster and we would spend hours backtracking his horse looking for it. That was one guy that needed a lanyard.

    They are not a bad idea and I wish more builders offered them as and option. Seems strange to me as I remember removing many of them from customers old 1917 revolvers and filling the holes in the grip frame.
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    Thought they would be a good idea if you are on the water. Over the years have talked to a number of folks who have lost handguns in rivers, lakes and ocean. All would have been prevented if the item was tied on with a lanyard. They were pretty popular in WW1 and into WW2 with troops, particularly the Brits.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I experimented with them in my horse days. All I can say is, they might be great for the plains and deserts of the world, but fuggedabout using them in brush. Anyone ever played with a garrote? Around your own neck? You got the picture.
    I here ya, stampede string on a hat dose the same thing. Being an Arizona brush popper I hate snagging gear of all kinds and pick things like split rains that will pull through a sticker bush over roping rains that snag. Fringe on anything also bugs me as a possible hang-up item of no usefulness.

    I do use a lanyard in a tent sometimes in bear country just in case but never in the field.
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  18. #18

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    I use the newer type telephone cord style such as the ones from Gemtech. They mount to the belt and keep out of the way. Having spent a few hours looking for other guys dropped handguns in the field I think they are useful.

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    I'm with gunbugs...I don't want to loose a handgun in the water. I've been upside down a time or two in a canoe, so far I haven't lost a gun, but the idea of putting a leash on them sounds pretty good to me.

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    Arleigh, I ask because the situation that you described is so remotely feasible that it's not a factor. Aside from that, most bear that I've encountered would bolt in a hurry if somebody came tumbling down on them.

    My question was not to intended as a slap in the face, simply a question about your bear statement that I disagree with.
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