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Thread: Venison ham

  1. #1
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Venison ham

    I thought I would share what I did with a bone-in Venison ham for Christmas.

    I used the Morton Quickcure wet brine solution on the bag and soaked the ham for 24hrs in 1cup cure to 4 cups water in the refrig.

    I pulled it out, pat dried, and coated with brown sugar on both sides

    Sprinkled with spices and smoked it for two pans and about 2 hrs with Alder.

    I then brought it to the BBQ seared both sides and put it in a small ceramic roasting pan with garlic cloves, Lea and Perins, and some water and baked at 325 for a couple hours.

    My family ate it up and my wife commented on how much it actually tasted like a store ham.

    I was surprised too. So for some variation in the way you prepare deer I hope you enjoy.

  2. #2
    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Default

    Sounds good. Did you take any pics? Would be interested in seeing what this thing looked like. What cut of meat did you use?

    A friend with a commercial, walk in smoker recently did some whole quarters and some back straps. He reports that they turned out well, but I do not have any other details.

  3. #3
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default No photos

    It was an entire bone in rear quarter from a very young buck. It was good looking and I should have taken a photo to share. Sorry.

  4. #4

    Thumbs up curing a deer ham

    next time you have a deer ham,
    get you some of the morton brown sugar cure, and cure the ham for at least 45 days or longer, inject the cure all around the bone, and inject the bone also on top and bottom, after 45 days put a little smoke on it, best cured ham you will have ever eaten
    just make sure you put it into a cloth sack with no dye in the cloth , hang it and nature will do the rest along with the sugar cure, if you like southern style country ham you will like this

  5. #5
    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    It was an entire bone in rear quarter from a very young buck. It was good looking and I should have taken a photo to share. Sorry.
    I bet it was tasty. Will have to try something like this in the future.

  6. #6
    hap
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    We have been doing entire hams in similar fashion for many years. I do not use any of the commercial "cures" as I do not think the nitrates and nitrites are any good for you. I use brown sugar, salt and spices and herbs.

    After smoking, just as the original poster does I put it in the oven covered at much lower temp... 200F, until done, which is falling off the bone. Usually about 5-6 hours and then turn the oven up and take the cover off to build a little crust.

    Just showing the option I use and find pretty close to worm-proof...
    art

  7. #7
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Dry vs wet

    I did it this way to be quick. One of these days I do a long dry cure. Indeed the best hams are done that way.

    So is the bag used to contain the sugar, spices and salt? I guess I'd have a hard time finding an area with a controlled temp. for a long curing process. I watched videos on youtube of big commercial dry brine processes and they had dedicated rooms set at 38 degrees for a lengthy cure. The best I could do here in SE is wait until winter and hang it outside in a shed and then I've got unregulated temperature changes. Maybe I'll have to look for a old used refrig to stick in the shop for this process and get some hooks in it for dry brining venison hams.

    I'll keep my eyes peeled for just such a refrig.

  8. #8
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    horse, Did you have to inject to the bone? i have attempted several small bear hams along this method as well... and seem always to have an uncured spot in the center. i never know how much is too much to actually inject in as i dont care for SALTY hams like my folks used to make under the dry cure program...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  9. #9
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default no injection

    No injections and there was a uncured portion in the center.

  10. #10
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default stupid question

    How can you tell that it wasn't cured?

  11. #11
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tboehm View Post
    How can you tell that it wasn't cured?
    the center is brown and the cured parts are pink-purple in compairson to the center...

    itis pretty obvious in that color change.

    no matter still taste great and like ham for the most part.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  12. #12
    Member fshgde's Avatar
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    Default ham experiment

    I took a moose roast and brined it with quick cure overnight coated with maple syrup , smoked 2 hours with hickory chips low temp. baked in oven at 250 degrees until internal temp was 170 degreess. The result was interesting tastes like ham on outside and moose on inside. The next time I will try to inject it in the center to get a more even taste. I have had delta meat make a bear ham before and it was great, I would like to get the process down before trying a large piece of meat though. Any suggestions on injecting brine same concentration or would one use a weaker concentration?

  13. #13
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    If you are doing a whole deer ham look for the femoral arteries or any other major blood vessels you see and inject them too. This may diffuse the cure throughout more of the meat in the center.

  14. #14

    Default how to dry cure any meat

    to cure any type meat you must inject around the bone, you must rub the curing compound into the bone area on both ends, you must rub the compound into the meat, i have a wooden box made out of untreated planks, i put a bed of rock salt on the bottom, after i have the meat treated i lay it in this box, the salt will absorb the liguid that is draining from the meat that is the secret to curing meat, you must get all the moisture out of it, after 30 days, you take the meat, put it in a cloth sack, i make mine out of old tee shirts, then i hang it in the utility building i have, it will continue to drain liquid but that is what you want it to do, we have over 100 degree temps here in the summer but once you get the moisture out of the meat doesn't matter it will not spoil, in fact it will form a green crust on the meat looks like mold but it will not hurt anything
    everyonce in awhile just smell the bone ends, they should have a nutty type smell, if it smells sour you didn't get enough cure around the bone in the meat.
    when you cut the meat it will have a reddish color, cut it into slices , put it into water to soak out the cure and fry it up, but when you cut the meat you gotta eat the whole thing because you break the crust , i cold smoke mine in a old fridge for 5 hours before i hange it, use only hardwoods to smoke it hickory or oak.
    you can cure fish like this also, they will last forever just keep the meat dryl

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