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Thread: Browning "SaltWood"

  1. #1

    Default Browning "SaltWood"

    Greetings,
    I am the proud owner of a Classic FN Browning 30-06 that suffers from the effects of a "Salt Wood" Stock. Presently I remove the BBl Action from the Stock to prevent further corrosion issues.
    My question is, can the stock be sealed to prevent further damage or should I use the Wood to heat the house. It's a beautiful stock and I would love to keep it.
    I was reading a thread that HAP (Art) posted about using Epoxy to seal his stocks. I thought that this might be the answer.
    HAP, let me know your thoughts...
    Thanks,
    Willy

  2. #2
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    From what I hear "saltwood" was produced to dry the stocks faster on the Japanese Brownings. The original Belgium ones I hear do not have this. Maybe you can find a replacement Belgium made stock. Not sure how sealing would work. Would have to be 100% coverage and thick I would think...my 2 cents worth...

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    Willy: You might try glassing (Brownells acraglass) every square milimeter of the bedding. Polish out the pits, reblue, use Rig (rust inhibiter) and have at it. I believe that would cure the issue. Might want to periodically check to ensure the salt has not migrated through the glass; I would be surprised if it would. Best of luck. J.

  4. #4
    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by THE_HUNTERIAM View Post
    From what I hear "saltwood" was produced to dry the stocks faster on the Japanese Brownings. The original Belgium ones I hear do not have this. Maybe you can find a replacement Belgium made stock. Not sure how sealing would work. Would have to be 100% coverage and thick I would think...my 2 cents worth...
    That is incorrect. The saltwood problem is on the later Belgian guns. It is most common on high grade Superposed shotguns from the late-60s to early-70s.

    At one time Browning would provide a replacement stock for saltwood guns. It would be worth contacting them to see if they will still do that.

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    I'd seen this issue on an FN Browning Safari Rifle... I don't think they really intended these stocks to be subject to 'wet conditions' so not a big deal in some climates. However, in Alaska... clearly a bad wood process leading to the corrosion and possible pitting problems.

    These stocks are nice looking and are part of the original package. If this means anything to you or of value - I would not call it firewood.

    Few things to do...
    A.) Clean 'er up and keep it dry or maintain the barreled action religiously.
    B.) Clean 'er up and Teflon coat the barreled action
    C.) Clean 'er up and put a replacement stock on the rifle

    The bedding ideas are not cost effective considering the amount of time plus expenditure to serve as complete, ongoing barrier from the salt-wood stock effects.

  6. #6
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    Default Salt wood

    The salt wood was actually salt dryed instead of kiln dryed for some reason - probably to save money and time.

    Browning restocked a lot of the guns but not sure what the policy was for them and when it stopped. The salt wood was used from 1962 to 1972 according to my source so it would ahve been on Belgium made guns.

    As the salt is adsorbed in the wood you would have to completely seal all of the contact surfaces between the wood and the metal. That would be a lot of inletting and sealing but if you were glass bedding the gun anyway it could be done without too much additional effort.

    A factory replacement stock would be extremely hard to find and also expensive. The replacement may also be a salt wood stock - I sure it could be tested somehow like using silver nitrate.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    I stand corrected. I have a Belgium Browning .22 takedown rifle from around the 50's and it is mint. I have never played in the rain with it but at that age even dry salts would have attacked the metal. Sucks that even a company like Browning would do something that bone headed as saltwood!

  8. #8

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    All,
    Thanks for the reply's. The Browning is not my main hunting rifle, just looking for options.
    Thanks again.
    Willy

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Don't know if they still do it but ten years ago or so Browning would still fix salt wood problems at little of no cost depending on the gun. I will also say some of their fixes were not that great in looks but some were fine.

  10. #10

    Default Salt Wood

    http://artsgunshop.com/index.html


    Has videos about Browning Salt wood

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Good vid to show what your up against

  12. #12

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    Good information from Art's Gun Shop. Thanks again for all the information.
    Willy

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    I had a "stock salt" problem with my browning Safari - 30-06. I wrote to browning and they informed me the following: If I was the original owner of the rifle, I could prove that I was the original owner by providing the receipt, and the rifle was less then 10 years old, they would take care of the problem. I was fortunate that the rifle was less then 10 years old and I did have the original receipt.

    The stock was completely checked with cracks and the rifle barrel where it came in contact with the stock was rusted. I was devistated when I saw this.

    I sent the rifle to Browning and after three weeks they returned it. When I received it, it was in "pristene" condition. New stock and all of the rust removed, and re-blued.

    There is no way when looking at it that it is possible to determine if the stock or the components have been redone. They did a excellent job and I tip my hat to Browning for taking care of this.

    SteveKJR

  14. #14

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    Art, in another thread a long time ago we discussed impregnating stock wood with epoxy. I was discussing that with my uncle the other day and he began telling me about a product he was in on the development of years ago at Union Carbide. It was Polyethylene Glycol or under the trade name of PEG. I have heard a little about it in woodworking circles for stabilizing wood and I wondered if you had ever used it or were familiar with it. The reasons they had in the development of the product sounded very similar to our discussion of the epoxy on stocks.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by hap View Post
    It does create finishing difficulties and is therefore not a good choice for projects using finer finishes. It would not be a good choice for gunstock finishing.

    By filling the pores PEG keeps the wood from shrinking as much as it normally would which reduces all sorts of stresses and deformation.
    My uncle said the same thing, though he said that oil finishes worked well in their tests over the PEG impregnated wood, therefore that's what made me wonder about its use for stocks. He did concede that any other finish i.e. urethanes and the like would not work.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by hap View Post
    Oil is a lousy wood finish if it is going to be subjected to water. It literally absorbs water vapor faster than bare wood. It looks great and using it over something which truly seals the wood creates a great combination of looks, strength, repairability, application ease, and stability. The PEG is not a water proof thing either and water that gets into the PEG will take forever to dry.
    art
    Interesting. Thanks for the info.

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    Interestingly enough - sodium chloride does not adsorb water or moisture from the air - it is the other "salts" or impurities in table salt that cause it to clump up and get moist in damp weather. If you dumped a pile of pure sodium chloride in a pile it the floor in a room it would just stay there pretty much unchanged.
    I wondered if sodium chloride acted like silica gel, and pulled moisture out of the air. It is interesting that the impurities are actually responsible for absorbing moisture and clumping in a salt shaker. I remember my folks putting a few grains of rice in the salt shaker to keep it from clumping, but I always assumed it was the salt itself doing the absorbing.

    Good info! Thanks, tvfinak.

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    Default

    This thread used to have a lot more posts in it. What happened?

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    Looks like somebody in control called a forced truce between Murphy and hap. At least one other whole thread disappeared.

    I thought it was getting kinda interesting myself - I would have liked to see the "pissing contest" go on myself.


    Quote Originally Posted by cwh View Post
    This thread used to have a lot more posts in it. What happened?
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    It's a pitty as there are few people that have more thorough and accurate knowledge about working and drying wood than Art, both from university level studying of the subject and decades of working wood with his hands.

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