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Thread: Scent Control

  1. #1
    Member AK-Sniper's Avatar
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    Default Scent Control

    I have been trying to do some research on scent control, and I am finding a lot of mixed reviews. I know that reading the wind and doing your best to put it in your favor is key, but any extra help is extra help!!

    Are there any scent blocking reccomendations out there that have proven themselves to Alaskan big game?

    I don't care if it's clothing, sprays, shower stuff, deodorants, anything

    Please let me know.
    Diamond Marquis

  2. #2
    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    Default scent and UV

    I use two seperate things. Scent control is importain but I feel UV is more importain. No matter what the wind is doing if they see you,your done. I wash my cloths in scent free laundry soap/ UV killer. then either line dry or dryer dry W/ earth scent dryer sheets. This includes hats and gloves. (I always wear at least lycric gloves) Then store everything in plastic bags W/ a scent wafer like acorn or fresh earth in the bag.
    When its time to hunt I don't put on any hunting cloths until I'm going to be away from human related scents, also a shower W/ scent free soap and use scent free deordorant. Then spray down the outer layer of your cloths W/ scent killer W/ or W/O cover scent to include your pack and boots. carry a small spray bottle of scent killer in your pack to reapply if you get sweaty or after a few hours. I pack my coat if I'm climbing and try to keep the overheating to a min. When I get in where I'm going to hunt I change my shirt and put the sweaty one into the zip-bag I had the clean one in. A little spruce cover scent on your gloves keep human scent from transfering to everything you touch.
    This may sound extreame but once you get the hang of it and your gear is all is all treated, you just wash up and spray down when you head out.
    If you want to test this scent stuff out find an area where there are some moose browseing regular and walk thru untreated touching branches and stomping around in old leather boots. hours later the moose will avoid where you have bin just like you smell bad?

  3. #3
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Default

    i dont really use any... i may use the spray stuff when headed to a bait stand... but after 10-15 days afield there are limits to any sent killer. when dealing with fires, cooking and other. what ever you used in VA should more then do fine for you particularly our wild life range from not taking you seriously to. you never got near them because they saw you in any form. when moose hunting we watch 100'ds of moose wander through hundreds of people... NIGHT vision is what you need some times..

    i have tried spot and stalking bears in sent lock gear and nothing like hiking straight up the side of a mtn... in what feels like a hefty sack after the first 1/2 mile open cuffs drain sweat and go again. just dont work for me. so... what ever your used to using and doing will prolly work up here just fine
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  4. #4
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    Default

    The best scent control is to know the area and stay down wind.

    I donít want to hijack your question. Are you sure the animal are not hearing you coming? Most hunters are heard walking long before they are smelled. It also will depend on the animal; bears will pick up a person sent on his feet. I had so many moose looking at me @ 50 feet I donít think my smell it a problem.

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    Default Scent free stinks

    Now let me explain -- smelling like nothing isn't natural or possible

    Charcoal suits regardless of price smell of ammonia, it's a naturally occuring process and ya can't stop it.

    Can't say what the others smell like, but they stink to me.

    Am a believer in UV killer but that's about it.

    Keep yer nose in the wind & ya can't go wrong when ya smell.

  6. #6
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Rutting Moose View Post
    The best scent control is to know the area and stay down wind.

    I donít want to hijack your question. Are you sure the animal are not hearing you coming? Most hunters are heard walking long before they are smelled. It also will depend on the animal; bears will pick up a person sent on his feet. I had so many moose looking at me @ 50 feet I donít think my smell it a problem.
    I agree with RM. How many critters have been killed all around the world in the last 100 years BEFORE scentblockers and carbon suits and whatnot? Get down wind, out of sight, and be patient is typically what works best...

  7. #7

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    Hello I am a back pack bow hunter. I hunt 5-7 days with one set of clothing. Ok so I stink after day 1. Here is what I do. I attach a piece of maribou feather to my quiver to watch the wind at all times. You can find camo colors in the fly tying section. Any wind will be noticed. I use scent free deodarant by HS hunter. I also make a fire and stand in the smoke. This is as close to a charcoal suit as I get. The animals seem to not mind the smell of a campfire as they probably smell this all the time.
    Very Important One of the best things you can do is cover your breath. Most people buy all kinds of scent free items and go hunting with bad breath. Your breath lets off more scent into the air than you would realize. I always hunt with apple flavored jolly ranchers in my mouth, and I have shot coyotes at less than 20 yards after calling them in. I have killed many large bucks, a few elk, several coyotes, and a few fox. I have killed all these with my bow using the technique I have described. Track the wind, smoke your clothes, get some apple jolly ranchers, and remember if you dont look like a bush you look like a hunter. Good luck.

  8. #8

    Default IMO they are not really needed here in Alaska

    Quote Originally Posted by rdklinak View Post
    [...] Charcoal suits regardless of price smell of ammonia, it's a naturally occuring process and ya can't stop it.
    But don't hurt either if you can afford them. IMO the exclusive use of any one thing is to little and to much of one thing isn't good either. Find the combination that works well for you and remember extras help, but success begins when your proficient in the basics. After that, additions can only increase your chances of success.

    I personally wear them as I like to stack the odds in my favor when ever possible and hunt multiple states. I am originally from Michigan and will tell you - they work but shouldn't be solely relied upon. The hunting pressure is so excessive back home I tried them looking for an advantage and was happy with the results. I'll put a whitetail's nose up against a Caribou or Moose any day and have sat within 15 yards of 150+ class trophy deer for hours on end. Like Mr. Cheap, I've also used the feather with great success since the age of 12. Bowhunters have used this for centuries. (Great point about our breath!)

    IMO Charcoal suits are a last resort to noise control, staying downwind of any/all game, personal sent management with base layer scent block clothing, keeping food and fire scents away, maintaining good personal hygiene, using earth scent and UV washing detergents, the right type of masking scents for your hunting area, etc. My clothes generally are in a sealed bag during the year and while hunting until needed. Once I get to my hunting area I'll take some moss, leaves, etc. and place them in the bag to add some natural scent to my clothes. Some may laugh and discard this - but it works for me.
    "He should have been packing a more powerful gun...you have to be a very good shot or very lucky to stop a brown bear with a .357 Magnum." - Rick Sinnott, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist after a double attack by a grizzly.

  9. #9
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    Question

    All this is truly great information and i do apprecitate every single bit of it. I will definitely be incorporating a lot of these tips into my hunts this year.

    One other question though. A few of you have mentioned a UV washing detergent for the clothes. What brands are there, as I have never heard about this stuff until now?
    Diamond Marquis

  10. #10
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK-Sniper View Post
    All this is truly great information and i do apprecitate every single bit of it. I will definitely be incorporating a lot of these tips into my hunts this year.

    One other question though. A few of you have mentioned a UV washing detergent for the clothes. What brands are there, as I have never heard about this stuff until now?
    sent killer or SPORTS WASH, comes in two pack bottles in most out door sections..one powder one liquid
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  11. #11

    Default

    Agreed. Also, you can check Cabela's website for alternate brands.
    "He should have been packing a more powerful gun...you have to be a very good shot or very lucky to stop a brown bear with a .357 Magnum." - Rick Sinnott, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist after a double attack by a grizzly.

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