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Thread: Haul road 5mile thing

  1. #1

    Default Haul road 5mile thing

    how do you figure your 5 miles when you leave the road i have hunted the road manny times mostly with a bow this year with horses. if you leave the road and walk 5 miles in a line and you are five miles there is a chance that the road makes a bend and you are to that point hope i make sense. so how do you measure?????

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    GPS. I'm not a hunter who generally carries a GPS, but when hunting 5 miles off the road, you need to carry one. Mark multiple spots along the road and make sure you're more than 5 miles out from each. They fly that area on a near daily basis and will catch you if you kill one at 4.5 miles.

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    Never done this hunt before but from the sounds of it, it would be good to have a GPS.

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    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    I'm not saying a GPS is mandatory, but I think you pretty much have to have one to know you've hit 5 miles. Unless you mark something on a map that's definitely more than 5 miles and then go there, but I'd just go with a GPS.
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  5. #5

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    i carry a gps and use it to hunt up there with but what i am getting at is that is the 5 miles 90 degree from were you start if you were going in a straight line. last year we were 6 miles out and got flown over all day long when they were looking for the lost hunter in the river. when you buy those maps that have the line drawn out it goes with the road when the road bends so does the border

    N69.24.854-W148.29.720 this is one that could be 5 miles or 3 miles depending on how you draw line

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    Default Closest Point

    You have to be 5 miles from any point on the road, period. There are maps with the road showing on them. 20 years ago I took maps and marked 5 mile points at every bend and change. Then I went back and drew in the lines. I never had a problem, pre GPS, knowing where I was at as long as I had my map and compass.
    You are correct, the GPS will only show how far you've come from your way point. So why not drive further up the road, and put in way points at any bend where the road changes direction toward the side you want to hunt?
    Really I don't see it being very hard to know exactly where you are at at any given time, especially with today's technology.
    The first time I hunted up north I did not have a map of the area we ended up at. We decided the best place for us to walk would be out of Toolik Lake as the road makes no bends toward the lake. We looked at another hunter's maps, got some ideas of topography, and took off.
    There are numerous ways to stay legal, and not have to worry about doing something silly.

  7. #7
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default 5 mile road confusion

    Alot of you guys are saying you have to be 5 miles from the road could confuse some, that does not mean you are outside the CORRIDOR !!!...you still have to be OUTSIDE the CORRIDOR, the corridor was set up to protect that pipeline, and the pipeline does not run parrallel to the road at a specific distance, it varies. so at times you might even have to hike out even further than the 5 miles. Couple years back a couple of hunters from the base got in trouble when troopers checked their gut pile that was only 3 miles from the corridor, when they marked it as 5 on their GPS.

  8. #8
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Actually, no. The Dalton Highway Corridor Management area is 5 miles each side of the Dalton Highway including the road surface. I have talked to the wildlife trooper in Coldfoot about this. In fact, it's also spelled out on the map here.
    http://wildlife.alaska.gov/gis/maps/..._daltonhwy.gif

    The purpose of the corridor is to protect the animal resources, not the pipeline. There was great fear in the early years of the Dalton that without protection the wildlife would be decimated. It really has nothing to do with the pipeline, otherwise you'd see the same protection all the way south of the Yukon River to Valdez.

    Couple years back a couple of hunters from the base got in trouble when troopers checked their gut pile that was only 3 miles from the corridor, when they marked it as 5 on their GPS.
    Most likely they did a poor job of making sure they were really five miles from the road.

    I was busted for this a few years ago on a bear bait station. Luckily the trooper was totally understanding and just made me take down the stand. He basically caught me by accident. The old trail I went in on went in 90 degrees to the highway. I went in 1/2 mile on my GPS and set up the bait. I registered it and a few days later a F&W trooper showed up to check it out. Yep, it was 1/2 mile from the highway. When he left he put the GPS on his dash. He drove south a little bit and stopped to make a cell call. He glanced at his GPS and realized he'd gotten quite a bit closer to my stand. Since the road took a sharp bend he ended up only being .24 miles from my stand, .01 miles too close to the road. I removed the bait at his request and filed the info of new things I learned.

    Use caution when using a Garmin base map to calculate also. My trip up the Dalton this year found areas that were a couple hundred yards off. If I were hiking in five miles I would take the extra couple hours and map the highway north and south of my walkout area by 10 miles each direction. It would then be a simple check to check your distances. If you don't know how to do this, then learn before you go.
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    N69.24.854-W148.29.720 this is one that could be 5 miles or 3 miles depending on how you draw line
    The answer is really simple..invision this...take the Dalton Highway...scoot it to the west 5 miles following every bend in the highway..that's the west boundary, scoot it to the east 5 miles and that's the east boundary.

    Using the basemap in my little Garmin Vista the first try was 2.62 miles. That looks like a pretty simple thing to figure out....if the road bends towards the direction you are heading you'd better keep real close track of where you are going.
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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    The answer is really simple..invision this...take the Dalton Highway...scoot it to the west 5 miles following every bend in the highway..that's the west boundary, scoot it to the east 5 miles and that's the east boundary.

    .

    Doug? i think that puts it back where you got it from.. you need to scoot it 10 miles east after scooting it west...
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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Yeah your right!, I was told otherwise, I was up there in 2007 when an outfitter was there with his horses, taking clients out just south of Slope Mtn. and trooper told him to go out 5 miles from the pipeline, I know the troopers name, I guess he didn't know or jut told them that to be on the safe side to ensure the 5 mile distance. who knows. I have witnessed alot of bad hunting practices up there, and reporting doesn't seem to help, I wonder if AST are sufficiently manned up there to catch everyone that breaks the law. Seen hunters carry both rifle and bow while out and about within the corridor, but I guess its legal, don't know, also seen hunters riding in the back of truck and on running boards cutting off caribou which is wrong in my opinion. I did see the fiasco that took place in 2007 (labor day weekend) when a couple hundred bou came thru the Toolik lake area, I just picked up and left, to go hunt moose south of Atigun on a draw permit I had. Anyways, the haul road is still one of my favorite places to hunt out of a truck.

  12. #12
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    There isn't enough enforcement to handle the crowds, but they're really aren't meeting their management goals on caribou so I don't think it's a high priority. A lot of the enforcement, from what I've seen, is with the guides and air taxis in Happy Valley. I've hunted the road the last two years and haven't seen a F&W Trooper other than at the office in Coldfoot.
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  13. #13

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    so if the corridoor goes bend for bend for the road you could be 5 miles if you went at 90 to the road in a bend you could get out of the 5 miles in one spot not in line in another direction

  14. #14
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Tough to explain in words. Yes, the corridor follows the road bend for bend. Look at the map in my earlier link.

    This is the best I can do for an example. (click on my picture) If you hike 5 miles east of the highway, perpendicular to the highway, BUT, the road takes a turn to the east 2 miles north of you, you are screwed. In that case you would need to hike TEN miles east of the highway if you stayed on your same path... or you would need to know your area and started heading a little south.
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  15. #15

    Default 5 miles out

    RMK, good question. As a lot of folks make the 90 degree mistake. Just make sure that you are 5 miles from any section/part of the road. You have to watch for the bends, turns, ect. in the road. I know that I can be 5 miles out according to the GPS and then I measure a line from my position to another section in the road to north or south and find that I am only 4.75 miles from that point. Just need to double check.

    And AKDOUG is correct. The corridor has really nothing to do with the pipeline itself and the corridor is measured from the road not the pipe. the 5 mile restriction is an over harvest mitigation rule because of the openess in that part of the country. But I am sure that Alyeska doesn't want anyone to shoot a hole in the pipeline either.

    good luck

  16. #16

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    ok that pretty much clears it up for me and other folks i have always gone with the 5 miles from anypoint is what i have gone with but it is kinda unclear to alot of people. if i dont bow hunt i use horses or a jet boat to get out so being way clear is not a problem for me thanks for all of the input on this

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