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Thread: Experiences so far: rubber soled wading boots?

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Experiences so far: rubber soled wading boots?

    How do you like your rubber soled wading boots so far? I know some are buying these boots because last year, when I looked some over at 2 local fly shops, they didn't have my size; sales were outpacing the limited supply.

    It does appear we're all going to be shopping for rubber-soled boots in the future and there's a good thread on a specific brand of rubber soled boot.
    I don't want to get into the felt vs rubber debate, but wonder generally what people's first impressions are with their rubber soled wading boots? Thanks.

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    Member jakec5253's Avatar
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    Default rubber soles

    I have a pair of Simms boots with Aquastealth soles. Two seaons on them now, and still as good as the first day. They are holding up great, no probelms so far. With the removable studs that Simms offers, these boots are just about perfect.


    Jake
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    Member Tight Lines's Avatar
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    Yes, we all will be wearing rubber sole boots soon!! Felt soles are not allowed on some rivers next year (Situk for example). I have always worn them and have never wished they were felt. Simms boots with Aquastealth soles are great.
    I'll hold on to my Bible & my Guns, you can keep the change!!!

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    I bought a pair of the Simms Streamtreads this spring. My first impression was that the advertised 80% of felt traction was a bit optimistic...

    However, after adding studs to them, I REALLY like them. Probably close to 100% of felt (or maybe better?) with the addition of no more slipping down grassy slopes or the problem of saturated felt soles freezing up.

    I bought a set of the Simms studs and they are great but are spendy... they have carbide BBs brazed to the bottoms. Hardware store "studs" (hex head screws) wear out too fast... the Chota hardened studs (I THINK) are going to be the ticket... they are pretty cheap.

    BTW, the Simms I have work well for freewading (we do that down here in America ) but have a large enough "gusset" to open up for the fall and winter fishing in waders...

    L

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    I bought the Korkers guide model this year. they came with a rubber and felt sole. The rubber sole that comes with them is NOT GOOD. They make a rubber sole (around 25 bucks)that works like felt. I put them on and have no problem with them at all. Id say 90% as good as felt. Quick and easy to replace and I am just hooked on the lacing system on the Korkers. Plus it is a nice lightweight boot that drains well and after 10 to 12 hours on the water a day that adds up. I have not used the felt that came with them as i figured we are all going to rubber soles might as well get used to it now
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

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    THe hiking sole that comes with the Korker boots is not for wading. The rubber that they use will get very hard in the cold water temps and become very greasy. The aquastealth and the Kling-On soles they make are what you want for wading.
    "The Tug is the Drug"

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akgloomis View Post
    THe hiking sole that comes with the Korker boots is not for wading. The rubber that they use will get very hard in the cold water temps and become very greasy. The aquastealth and the Kling-On soles they make are what you want for wading.

    Thanks akgloomis for clearing it up, I knew there was a name for them but was a few beers in when i typed that and could not remember it.
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

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    Default simms G4

    greetings, can someone tell me what to expect with a simms g4 guide boot? I guess it's a new model from them priced around 219.00 i wanted to wait until spring to see what studded boots were out on the market but but from reading some reviews, many models had studs break off and such...plus i wondered if a screw broke off and the other half was stuck inside...it just might add frustration. I didn't really wish to do a ton of research as i felt that Simms already had done so to put these on the market. I usually don't buy their waders but my only 2 wading boots are both simms.

    weeks ago I purchased the simms G4. I still have the tags on and they look and feel mighty sturdy, comfortable, roomy and guess the vibram traction is supposed to be pretty good. I'm thinking any vibram sole would be much more gripping than felt. I haven't used them yet.

    if someone can tell me if i made a good decision or not i would appreciate it.

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Depends...

    Quote Originally Posted by crippled anchovie View Post
    ... can someone tell me what to expect with simms g4 guide boot?...priced around 219.00 ... I usually don't buy their waders...weeks ago I purchased the simms G4. I still have the tags on ...if someone can tell me if i made a good decision or not i would appreciate it.
    The size 10 boots Simms makes are often poor choices, but if they're 10's, there's a way out. Shoot me a PM.

    Try the waders... if you're Medium/Long. Seriously...

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    Quote Originally Posted by crippled anchovie View Post
    weeks ago I purchased the simms G4. I still have the tags on and they look and feel mighty sturdy, comfortable, roomy and guess the vibram traction is supposed to be pretty good. I'm thinking any vibram sole would be much more gripping than felt. I haven't used them yet.

    if someone can tell me if i made a good decision or not i would appreciate it.
    I purchased a pair of the Simms Freestone boots with the Vibram soles last winter. I alternated them with two pairs of Simms G3 boots during this fishing season and was very happy with them. I didn't have any problems with footing where ever I fished. The vibram soles grip better on muddy banks and on snow and ice. The vibram soles are also good if you are going to hike in to fish.

    I think there are two different studs or spikes out now for the Simms Vibram soles, but I don't have either yet. The studs on my felt G3 boots work well.

    I don't have the Simms G4 wading boots. I fished for about a week with a friend from Australia this fall. He had worn out a pair of Korkers fishing four weeks in the lower 48 before he arrived in Alaska. He had a pair of G4s shipped to my mail box. He wore them for a week fishing with me and was very happy with them.

    I've fished in the Simms Freestone, Guide, and G3 boots and they have all been good products. The G3s are made wide so they are very comfortable to fish in and are easy to get on and off. I assume that the G4s would be the same. The Guide boots are cut a little narrow for me, so I don't use them as often as the others. The Freestone are wider than the Guides and are okay to get on and off, but not as comfortable as the G-3s. But I think I bought the Freestones for $99 so they were a great buy.

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    I've missed something, why are felt soles being restricted? I've always liked my felt soled wading boots.

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    They are being restricted due to their ability to transfer invasive species like mudsnails, algae, zebra mussels, etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jarredbehrendt View Post
    They are being restricted due to their ability to transfer invasive species like mudsnails, algae, zebra mussels, etc.
    allegedly - no such preferential transfer of any of these organisms from dirty felt (compared to dirty rubber, or dirty waders) has ever been demonstrated. At best, unproven conjecture - at worst - a myth that just plain isn't true.

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    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevesch View Post
    allegedly - no such preferential transfer of any of these organisms from dirty felt (compared to dirty rubber, or dirty waders) has ever been demonstrated. At best, unproven conjecture - at worst - a myth that just plain isn't true.
    Beg to differ...

    This Study claims up to 3000 time the number of organisms on felt as opposed to rubber (after 5 hours, figure #3)

    Pay close attention to page 52 onward.

    Does this mean that nothing else transfers invasives? No.

    Does it mean that we as intelligent, rational beings need to be good stewards and make intelligent, rational decisions about what we wear in and out of our recreational streams? Yes.

    Maybe other states want to vacillate about this, or let a few nuts gum up the system, but they don't have anywhere near the resource that AK stands to lose. Better to be a little off base and still have a fully functioning ecosystem than to be wrong and permanently destroy fisheries in willful ignorance.

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    Member scott_rn's Avatar
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    There is a decent review of rubber soled boots in the winter 2010 issue of flyfishing & tying journal. The dude waded with a felt soled boot on one foot and alternated 6 different rubber soled boots to compare them.

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G_Smolt View Post
    Beg to differ...

    This Study claims up to 3000 time the number of organisms on felt as opposed to rubber (after 5 hours, figure #3)

    Pay close attention to page 52 onward.

    Does this mean that nothing else transfers invasives? No.

    Does it mean that we as intelligent, rational beings need to be good stewards and make intelligent, rational decisions about what we wear in and out of our recreational streams? Yes.

    Maybe other states want to vacillate about this, or let a few nuts gum up the system, but they don't have anywhere near the resource that AK stands to lose. Better to be a little off base and still have a fully functioning ecosystem than to be wrong and permanently destroy fisheries in willful ignorance.

    As usual you make a great point smolt. I went to rubber soles this year. I find them just as good and yes I paid big bucks for my boots but when you pretty much live in them all summer why not
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Link for separate discussion about the change...

    Quote Originally Posted by fishslayer View Post
    I've missed something, why are felt soles being restricted? I've always liked my felt soled wading boots.
    Here you go - good discussion on the pros/cons of this change (whether felt boots SHOULD go away). In short though, the horse seems well out o' the barn: http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=47139

    I was just interested in folks' experiences so far - because I'll be shopping for boots soon and will probably skip the felts. Appreciate the input so far.

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    You might want to take a look at NRSweb.com. Go to 'footwear' and look at the ATB Boot. This is a boot that was originally intended for use on tough RAFTING/KAYAK portages and SAR work. It just happens as a coincidence that they are excellent wading boots for fishing because the sole pattern and material are made for increased grip on just about any river surface (and they hike well w/out tearing up your waders, feet or back). The comfort and support of these boots is amazing (IMO). They are also pretty darn light, which I like for remote pack-ins.

    About 4-5 years after NRS came out with this boot, they started putting felt on the soles (probably because so many people were buying them for fishing).

    Price is about half of what you'd pay for the G4 Boots from Simms.

    Hope that helps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 6XLeech View Post
    How do you like your rubber soled wading boots so far?
    I don't want to get into the felt vs rubber debate, but wonder generally what people's first impressions are with their rubber soled wading boots?
    6X:
    I just reported on the LL Bean Aquastealth on a different thread - but to reiterate - they are sweet so far. Only been in two different rivers with them, but I honestly think, for a super-sized guy like myself, they offer more traction in the water than felt. Someone else suggested that the bigger you are, the better they may stick.

    If I had to guess, the new Simms are probably even better.

    If you fish when there is snow on the ground, you will absolutely love them....no more of the "stilts" effect that you get with felt...

    Put another way, the beans are like wearing around hiking boots all day.

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