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Thread: Flying With Dogs

  1. #1

    Default Flying With Dogs

    Hey guys, we recently got a husky/lab mix (11 weeks old) and are wondering about when to take him on his first flight. I know a lot of you have dogs of your own or do Iditarod transports so any info would be appreciated. Specifically, any thoughts on these items;
    1) Long term hearing damage
    2) Does the cotton-in-the-ears thing work?
    3) Do those fancy dog headsets/muffs I see in the catalogs work?

    He seems to be ok in the car so I think the motion sickness won't be a huge factor, though I'm not sure about the pressure changes.. I assumed that something that would make him want to chew/swallow would induce ear popping but not sure what the most effective treat/food would be or if it even matters..

    Anything else I'm not considering?

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
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    Default

    My dog goes with. She wears Mutt Muffs and doesn't seem to mind them. Most of the time I'll tie her short of the front seat. There's never a good reason not to, I just get lazy.

  3. #3

    Default dog flying

    I fly with my Chesapeake Bay Retriever once in a while. I would do it more but she weights about 85lbs so that is a lot of payload to me. If you are in Anchorage, Northern Lights Avionics has the mutt muffs i think.

    My dog usually rides shotgun sitting on the seat for half the flight and then getting on the floor when she gets tired of looking out the window. I would recommend tying down a new dog just to be safe. I push the yoke over and make the dog feel a little weightlessness if she starts wondering around too much. I guess dogs dont like the floating feeling and she lays right down trying to keep her feet on the ground. She usually stays like that the rest of the flight unless I tell her to move.

  4. #4
    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default since a pup

    Flown with my 120 pound rott since he was a pup (6 weeks or so). He started young enough, so he was not excitable about flying when he got big enough to be a problem. Start them early and you will be better off IMO. As mentioned, tie them off if any chance they will be excited. By the time mine was 6 months old, it was boring to him and he was normally sleeping shortly after takeoff. Now he's sleeping before the prop starts turning.

  5. #5
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    I have a skittish lab and she has a love hate relationship with the airplane. She hates to be left behind, but she doesn't like to get in the airplane more than once a day. In the aircraft she is fine. In the back seat she is happy. In the baggage she some times tries to climb in to the back seat. She has nosed the throttle once... I guess that is why you should always keep a hand on the throttle. Not a big deal she just tries your patience from time to time... kind of like a furry kid!

    JB

  6. #6

    Default

    we fly dogs almost everyday, the vast majority just go to sleep. We have to tie them down or have them in a crate now. The FAA took a friends license for 30 days 'cause he didn't have a dog tied down.

    Last summer I went to pick up some tourists from Seldovia, the worst kind..New Yorkers. My manifest said 4 pax and a dog. when I get out of the plane, I ask where is your dog? They reply that "of course we don't have a dog, do you see one?" and that one of the reasons they don't like Seldovia and are leaving early is that there are so many dogs running loose around town.

    About that time a guy drives up with the dog in the back of his rig. I say "okay, here is the dog, lets load up and go" the New Yorkers say "no way is the dogs going with them on the plane" and "the dog can wait." By that time I am tired of the New York nasal voice, accent and attitude. And so I reply "The dog's human flies with me twice a week all year round, the dog is going to be on the plane when I take off, and I don't really give a sh** if you are." Now that my friends is customer service.

    Yes, they got on, one of them had to sit in the very back with this 100 lb dog that smelled like it was rolling in fish guts and shedding like crazy. To tell you the truth the dog stunk so bad that if they weren't such pushy New Yorkers, I probably would have told the guy to go wash the dog, and I would take him later.
    The winner isn't the person with the most gold when they die, but rather, the person with the most stories.

  7. #7

    Default

    Thanks for the info... i will be sure to tie him down and get some of those muffs from northern lights..

    Headout, that's a great story. Glad to hear you love New Yorkers so much. I love people from Boston, they're equally cheery and have an even nicer accent. I could talk about Texans, but I have a feeling half the folks on this board have some direct Texas connection, so I'll just mention that no matter what, we're still bigger.

    Must be interesting to fly random strangers around regularly - sounds like a good way to accumulate stories about humanity, both good and bad.

  8. #8
    Member ret25yo's Avatar
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    Default

    heres 5 in a 206, they go mining with their owners in the summer..



    and yes they r tied
    and ready to get out

    If you cant stand behind the troops in Iraq.. Feel free to stand in front of them.

  9. #9
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    Default dogs

    I have sent a PM to you..

  10. #10
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    I used to fly with my big lab all the time. I used a harness with a 1' lead clipped to the back of it. Then, I looped the hand hold through the seatbelt in the back seat of my 180. He could check out either window and had a little slack to lay down but wouldn't come far enough forward to hit the windshield in the event of a problem.

  11. #11
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    I once watched a Lake Hood air taxi operator picking up a pair of duck hunters from the mud flats across the Inlet. Their black lab was wet, muddy, and smelly, so the pilot elected to put the dog into one of the Beaver's float lockers.

    Upon landing back at Lake Hood, and when the float locker had been opened, the lab was helped out. He couldn't stand for almost one hour. I was told that he hadn't regained his balance at the end of the second day, and his walking was more of a wandering gait.

    Don't put your dog into a float locker, please . . . . .

  12. #12
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    Default

    I had a great time flying with my dog last week. she is small and it was her first time. I tied her in the baggage comp she seemed to like it.
    At least better than the snow machine ride. lol
    I have Friends that tell me if you start them out flying young they seem to real like it.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13

    Default Flying With the Dog - No problem

    Thanks again for the stories and advice - He fell asleep in my wifes lap before we had even taxied out.. changed positions a few times during the 2 hour flight but otherwise just slept and didn't care one bit!

    Here are two photos of Charlies first flight..



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