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Thread: Opinions on the 2009/2010 Grizzly 550 FI w/PS

  1. #1
    Member Medo's Avatar
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    Default Opinions on the 2009/2010 Grizzly 550 FI w/PS

    Greetings,
    The time has come to retire my 92 bayou 300, and get a new workhorse. I use my atv primarily as a workhorse for firewood harvesting and gold prospecting, though it does have to still perform standard ATV duties. I have decided that bottom line I must have locking diffs, power steering, and fuel injection. The 550 griz seems to fit that bill. I see that the suzuki quad runner 500 is equipped very similar, and is cheaper, but the grizzly just seems like a better made rig. I am not brand loyal when it comes to the best atv, so Im willing to hear any input on any of them. the 550-600 cc range is what Im looking at, though i would do the 700 grizz ps/fi model if I could justify the extra grand for 120 odd ccs. So, I turn to folks who actually own and have used them to get your input. Good bad or ugly. I dont want to waste 8 grand on a rig that isnt going to do what I need.
    Thanks for any help folks and Merry Christmas!

  2. #2
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    I have both a 550 and a 700, the 550 is very nice, ride quality to the power steering. It is missing a little grunt compared to the 700 but if you never ride one you wont know its missing. I have 1200 very hard miles on the 700 and the only thing broke was a zerk fitting and a flat tire, the 500 is the same machine just a different bore.

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    Member AKMuddy's Avatar
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    I have the Grizzly 700. The Grizzly 550 will be a great machine for you. I prefer the 700 for the additional top end but I would purchase a 550 in a heartbeat!!! I have 1400 miles on my Grizzly and the only issue I have had is bent rear brake rotors and calipers. The damage was done by the rider (me), not a failure in quality of the machine. Let us know what you get.
    2007 Yamaha Rhino 660
    2007 Yamaha Grizzly 700 SE w/EPS
    http://www.grizzlycentral.com/

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    I have a 660 and a 700. I love the power steering. I think the 550 would be fine for you, after all think back on what you have been able to do with the old Kawasaki 300.

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    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    I ride the Grizz 700 and love the power steering. I've never regretted my choice of ride.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    and there you have it.... just go buy the yammy like I told you to in the first place! Then this spring you can try this with me Someday I'll tell you "the rest of the story".... it got ugly when I hit something under there...


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    Member Medo's Avatar
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    I think that moderator guy is biased

  8. #8
    Member Silvertipgrizz's Avatar
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    Both machines are more than capable for what you want go ride them before you decide....Merry Christmas

  9. #9

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    I have a Grizzly 550 (2009 model) minus the power steering and love it. I used mine to plow snow all last winter and thus far this winter and can't see any reason why I would want the power steering. It steers easy even with the blade hanging out front.

    I have also used it as my sole hunting and wood cutting vehicle. Its been through everything the timber and wetlands have to offer and has never left me with anything but smiles.

  10. #10
    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    I have a Grizzly 550 (2009 model) minus the power steering and love it. I used mine to plow snow all last winter and thus far this winter and can't see any reason why I would want the power steering. It steers easy even with the blade hanging out front.

    I have also used it as my sole hunting and wood cutting vehicle. Its been through everything the timber and wetlands have to offer and has never left me with anything but smiles.
    We ride some really rocky trails and on terrain like that the power steering just shines. Rooty, narrow trails that require a lot of turning are also greatly improved. We ride with some folks that don't have PS and they are just beat up after a 60 mile ride whereas we feel fine.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

  11. #11
    Member AKMuddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EagleRiverDee View Post
    We ride some really rocky trails and on terrain like that the power steering just shines. Rooty, narrow trails that require a lot of turning are also greatly improved. We ride with some folks that don't have PS and they are just beat up after a 60 mile ride whereas we feel fine.
    I agree with you. The advantages of the power steering have little to do with the easy of steering the machine. The advantages come in the technical arena and the added bump steer provided by the power steering unit. As an example...I was riding out at Jim Creek in the snow. I hit a car bumper at 55mph that was buried in the snow. Both front and rear driver side tires were ripped apart with huge holes in the side wall. I was riding in the standing position when this happened. Without power steering I would have been thrown from my Grizzly and injured very badly. Because of the added bump steer from the power steering unit I was able to recover and stay on the machine with zero injuries or damage other than the two tires.

    Additionally, I ride with folks that don't have power steering. After a 50 -60 mile ride they are beat and tired and ready to go home. So we load up the quads and head for the house. Once I get home, I unload the Grizzly and head out for another 30 - 50 mile ride....and I am still not tired when I get home. Most of our riding speeds range from 30 - 65mph except in the mud or technical stuff. I will never own a quad without power steering again. The power steering does make that much of a difference!
    2007 Yamaha Rhino 660
    2007 Yamaha Grizzly 700 SE w/EPS
    http://www.grizzlycentral.com/

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    I have a 700 Grizzly and love it. I looked at the 550 but they are both the same atv except the piston in the 550 is smaller spend the extra 1000 to 1500 dollars and get yourself the bigger motor. If you never road one with power steering you won't miss it. I have and my next quad will have power steering. You will love power steering on long rides.

  13. #13

    Default suzuki

    I have a Suzuki KQ500 with the power steering, I have owned Grizzly's and Suzuki's and they are both great built machines. I picked the Suzuki because it felt more stable when riding than the 550 Grizz, but that was my personal choice. For a real workhorse Arctic Cats are hard to beat as well. Drive all you can and make the decision based off what you like the best.

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    Default I agree

    I have an 08 Grizz 700 fi EPS. It's only got 400 miles or so, but I haven't had a single problem except a flat tire. Great machine. My only gripe is that the motor sounds like it rattles, but to my understanding this is perfectly normal. I don't know if the 550s have the same noise, or if Yamaha fixed that minor issue on the newer models.

    The Suzuki is also a nice ride and now I see Honda has caught up with power steering and independent rear suspension also.

    Some tough choices out there. In all honesty, you probably can't go wrong with either of those 3 brands.

    Arctic Cat and Polaris machines are about 150 lbs heavier than the Suzukis or Yamahas. Even the best machines get stuck, so the extra weight is something to consider if you do a lot of technical riding.

    Happy shopping.

  15. #15

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    The wife and I seriously considered the 550 for her new machine, that is until we found out that Honda was coming out with a new IRS Rancher with EPS. We both rode the 550 and really liked it and if Honda hadn't of come out with this new machine she'd have one in our garage. Should I ever get a new ride it will probably be the 550 Grizzly unless Honda comes out with an IRS Foreman with diff lock.

  16. #16
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    [QUOTE=zeb;642808]

    Arctic Cat and Polaris machines are about 150 lbs heavier than the Suzukis or Yamahas.

    QUOTE]

    Per the manufacture brochures, the Suzuki 500 is around 70# heavier than the Yamaha 550. Just throwing that out there. My .02..

  17. #17

    Default weight

    For imported Japanese machines there are restricted to 600 pounds dry weight. Suzuki gives wet weight of 672 and Yamaha uses the dry weight of 603 in the brochures. Polaris and Arctic Cats aren't weight resticted, which is why they are heavier

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    Unless they changed, Yamaha Grizzlies are made in the USA. I know my 2002 660 is and it's dry weight is 600lbs.

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    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_guy View Post
    For imported Japanese machines there are restricted to 600 pounds dry weight. Suzuki gives wet weight of 672 and Yamaha uses the dry weight of 603 in the brochures. Polaris and Arctic Cats aren't weight resticted, which is why they are heavier
    I don't know whether that is true or not, but weight is a consideration of mine when I select a machine. If I've got two machines that both have the features I'm looking for (engine braking, power steering, good four wheel drive, engine size and reliability) and one weighs 200 lbs more, I'm going to buy the lighter machine. I'm the same way with my sleds. I choose Skidoo because feature-for-feature Skidoo makes the lightest sled. Power to weight ratio matters, to me at least.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

  20. #20

    Default weight

    "Unless they changed, Yamaha Grizzlies are made in the USA. I know my 2002 660 is and it's dry weight is 600lbs".

    It still has to meet japanese manufacturer import weights as does suzuki, polaris and arctic cat do not have to meet those weights. My point being you have to compare apples to apples, wet weight to wet weight
    Last edited by Alaska_guy; 01-13-2010 at 13:55. Reason: cause i wanted to

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