Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Fireworks

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    867

    Default Fireworks

    Was playing with some fireworks photography and was somewhat pleased. No wind and lights from Palmer kept the smoke visable but aside from that was pleased with my first attempt.

    Bumped the ASA to 800, F14 and shutter was 2.5, I shoot a NIKON D70 with a 18-200 on a tripod.

    Looking for all suggestions/advise to cut the learning curve a bit. Standing in the cold makes trying too many different settings, not-so-fun.





    Reduced the size for posting.

  2. #2
    Member Floyd_Davidson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Barrow, Alaska
    Posts
    388

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by George Riddle View Post

    Bumped the ASA to 800, F14 and shutter was 2.5, I shoot a NIKON D70 with a 18-200 on a tripod.

    Looking for all suggestions/advise to cut the learning curve a bit. Standing in the cold makes trying too many different settings, not-so-fun.
    It's hard to tell with such small images, but it appears you are off to a good start!

    There are some interesting aspects to photographing fireworks that you can use on your next attempt. First, you're apparently already using a tripod, and probably have a remote trigger device for it. Obviously you are using manual exposure settings too. I can't tell if you turned off auto focus or not, but manual focus an absolute requirement.

    Then consider that, because the fireworks moves, shutter speed has virtually nothing to do its exposure! ISO settings and aperture control exposure of the light from the fireworks. The shutter speed controls how much of an explosion is included... plus how much exposure any surrounding background gets.

    With a D70 you'll want to look at a histogram or the blinking highlight display after an initial shot to see if the fireworks is being over exposed. It's probably best to keep the ISO as low as possible, and then keep the aperture in the f/8 to f/16 range. F/8 would be preferred for sharpness, but even at ISO 100 may overexpose the fireworks too much.

    This image was shot at ISO 200, f/14, and 8 seconds exposure using a Nikon D3 with a 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 lens set to 60mm.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •