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Thread: bedding and free floating

  1. #1
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    Default bedding and free floating

    is there a good tutorial on how to do this? how hard is it?

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Pretty darned easy, and I'm sure there are some tutorials out there.

    The most imporant part is putting mold release on everything that will come in contact with the bedding compound, and it'll get on stuff you didn't plan so don't skimp with the release! You also sometimes need to use clay to plug up holes or other depressions that would cause the bedding compound to mechanically lock the action in place in spite of mold release.

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    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    I don't bed my own. I let gunsmiths do that. Free floating is easy. Get a dollar bill and sand paper. Run the dollar bill under the barrel until is catches. When it catches make note of where it catches, remove the barrel, and sand that area. Replace the barrel and run the dollar bill through again. Do this until the dollar bill runs freely up to in front of the action. Make sure to stop well before the bedding of the action and make sure to take just enough from the stock to float it and no more.

    Brett

  4. #4

    Default Brett, you didn't mention

    putting a couple good sealing coats of stock finish to seal the barrel channel wood to prevent swelling and maybe warping which would negate all that sanding and such. Myself, I prefer to open up the barrel channel more, lay several layers of wide tape, like duct tape, along the barrel, put release on the tape and glass bed the barrel channel. That way, the barrel channel is sealed with a nice clearance between it and the barrel when the tape is removed. I also do something that most don't, which I learned from a good smith from Alaska, Red Morton. About 1 1/2" from the front of the forend, I leave about a 1" gap in the tape so that there is a strip of bedding material touching the barrel there, then, when the barreled action and stock are joined together to let the bedding cure, I put 2 lbs. of weight hanging from the front sling swivel stud. That way, when everything is done, there will be 2 pounds of upward pressure on the barrel. Every gun I've done this way has been a better shooter.

  5. #5

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    If you've never bedded an action before, I would recommend doing a lot of research on it and read more than one good article on it. The opportunity to screw up is big, and if you screw up, at best you'll probably loose a stock and at worse you will loose a stock and a receiver.

    Here's are a couple of good threads on it...

    http://www.longrangehunting.com/foru...bedding-38280/

    http://www.longrangehunting.com/foru...48/index3.html

    http://www.snipershide.com/forum/ubb...1167022&page=1

    Here's a very good article on it...

    http://www.6mmbr.com/pillarbedding.html

    Mark

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    putting a couple good sealing coats of stock finish to seal the barrel channel wood to prevent swelling and maybe warping which would negate all that sanding and such. Myself, I prefer to open up the barrel channel more, lay several layers of wide tape, like duct tape, along the barrel, put release on the tape and glass bed the barrel channel. That way, the barrel channel is sealed with a nice clearance between it and the barrel when the tape is removed. I also do something that most don't, which I learned from a good smith from Alaska, Red Morton. About 1 1/2" from the front of the forend, I leave about a 1" gap in the tape so that there is a strip of bedding material touching the barrel there, then, when the barreled action and stock are joined together to let the bedding cure, I put 2 lbs. of weight hanging from the front sling swivel stud. That way, when everything is done, there will be 2 pounds of upward pressure on the barrel. Every gun I've done this way has been a better shooter.
    I have seen a number of variations on this, from propping the curing rifle up on the barrel and toe of the stock to applying negative or positive forces to one side or the other. And they seem to work, but you are not putting two pounds of force on the barrel this way. I would be surprised if any pressure could be measured that way.

    The weight has to first overcome the stock rigidity and two pounds, unleveraged, is not going to deflect many stocks. Also, the moment arm is undefined (stud location varies) because forearms are different length... Not disputing it works, just the two pounds force figure.

    Neutral bedding full-length was hard enough for me to accept, but I have found slimmer contours shoot better that way.
    art

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Gibbs View Post
    is there a good tutorial on how to do this? how hard is it?
    There are several ways to go about this and various gunsmiths use different epoxies to bed their rifles and apply it in different ways. I've personally bedded several dozen rifles and I am not a gunsmith so it must be fairly easy and straightforward. I've used various epoxies as well, but Brownells Acraglas Gel is a very good product and I've gotten consistently fine results using it. As far as available tutorials, I just read the instructions that are packaged int he Acraglas and went from there but I know that Brownells has informative articles on their website. You can give the techs at Brownells a call if you like. They are competent and helpful if you'll contact them.

    http://www.brownells.com/userdocs/le...glas%20gel.pdf

    My main word of advice would be PATIENCE. Take your time. IMO the key to good results is in the prep work. Do not rush through the steps. Make certain that everything you do not want glass bedded is taped and has adequate release agent applied. Follow the instructions closely and you should be satisfied with your results.

  8. #8
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    Default Glass bedding

    I started glass bedding years ago in the early 60s with the old Herter's stuff and learned by trial and error.

    Johnson's paste wax works great as a release agent - cheap and easy to apply - use lots of it!

    Get a set of Foster stockers makers T-handled screws for your action from Brownells - a small investment that will pay off up front. DO NOT use the standard action screws - you will only bugger them up and maybe mess up your trigger guard. Use lots of grease on the threads and the sholders of the screws where they contact the trigger guard.

    If you want to free float the barrel use a layer or two of clear cellophane tape like 3M packaging tape. Lay it on smoothly and you will get a nice smooth uniform clearance. Apply the Johnons past wax to it and peel it off after you are finished.

    If you are bedding a finished stock coat the stock with multiple layers of wide masking tape and then coat the tape with paste wax so you can peel off the beddding compound that end oozes out on the stock. Otherwise you will have a mess getting the cured epoxy off the stock. Epoxy may affect the masking tape so the paste wax over it is a must!

    It's not that hard but you can screw up. Rememeber that paint remover - the nasty methyl chloride stuff - will remove epoxy as a last resort if every thing else fails! At the worse you should only screw up a stock - the metal can always be saved.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
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  9. #9
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    putting a couple good sealing coats of stock finish to seal the barrel channel wood to prevent swelling and maybe warping which would negate all that sanding and such. Myself, I prefer to open up the barrel channel more, lay several layers of wide tape, like duct tape, along the barrel, put release on the tape and glass bed the barrel channel. That way, the barrel channel is sealed with a nice clearance between it and the barrel when the tape is removed. I also do something that most don't, which I learned from a good smith from Alaska, Red Morton. About 1 1/2" from the front of the forend, I leave about a 1" gap in the tape so that there is a strip of bedding material touching the barrel there, then, when the barreled action and stock are joined together to let the bedding cure, I put 2 lbs. of weight hanging from the front sling swivel stud. That way, when everything is done, there will be 2 pounds of upward pressure on the barrel. Every gun I've done this way has been a better shooter.
    I generally think in terms of synthetic stock...at least up here. As a general rule free floating is better than leaving pressure points, but if that doesn't work try the contact like you suggested. That said I've never had free floating a barrel not work.

    Brett

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