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Thread: They go bang!

  1. #1
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Default They go bang!

    Shot some of my first .44 handloads on Sunday at Birchwood. I loaded some 240 jhp for my .44 revolver & rifle, using the same load. I also tested some .44 revolver-only loads. I was happy that all the rounds I shot went BANG! I also shot some of my 38 special 125 jhp (thanks Mauserboy ); three of my .38's wouldn't go into the revolver cylinder, but besides that, all went well. I kinda did the cardinal sin and loaded 300 of the .38's without testing them first, BUT I was at my buddy's using his Dillon and kinda had the nod from him.

    After the new year I'm going to try and work up a 30.06 load. I'm afraid I'll probably dent a lot of cases figuring out the lube process, but I've got a lot of '06 brass.

    Btw, do they make carbide .444 dies, since its a straight walled case?

    Tim

  2. #2

    Default Congrats

    I guessing the 3 rounds of 38 that didn't go in the gun were due to excesive crimp on the bullet causeing a slight bulge. I can't find any reference to a set of 444 carbide dies. 30-30 and 30-06 are good rifle rounds to start loading as there are many cheap components available. AND if you mess up a couple of rounds of brass it isn't a buck a round.
    Congrats on your new hobby !! Good Luck
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  3. #3

    Default Nope

    No .444 cabide dies from the major manufacturers.

  4. #4
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    I really like the Lee factory crimp dies for handgun rounds. There's a carbide ring in them and they take out any "bumps" in the case that might stop them for being chambered.

  5. #5
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brav01 View Post
    I guessing the 3 rounds of 38 that didn't go in the gun were due to excesive crimp on the bullet causeing a slight bulge.
    Upon a cursory inspection at the range, I think that is what happened.

    I thought they may make carbide dies for straight-walled cases but I can't find them either. I'll just have to man-up and figure out the process the hard way.

    Tim

  6. #6
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeonardC View Post
    I really like the Lee factory crimp dies for handgun rounds.
    Is this an entirely different die altogether? I thought my Lee die seated and crimped the bullet.

    Tim

  7. #7
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    It is for me. I seat and crimp in 2 steps. The Lee factory crimp die I buy by itself.

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    Default Good luck!

    We have all loaded rounds that wouldn't go in the gun. There are a multitude of reasons that can cause that to happen and you will discover many of them as you go along. Just find out that they won't work at the range rather than on a hunting trip or in a gunfight!

    I've salvaged a lot of pistol rounds that won't go in the gun by running them partially back into the steel sizing dies - carbide doesn't work as well. For rifle cases I've ran them back into dies with a large bullet - a .458 die will resize the base of about any round made on the 300 H&H case for example while an .30-06 die will work for .270 Win. and .30-06. A small base .458 sizing die and a small base .35 Whelen die will salavage a lot of cases and loaded rounds.

    Unless you are forming cases you shouldn't have to worry about too much lube. Keep it off the shoulders is the biggest thing. I use the Lee lube or Hornady paste and smear a small amount on with my fingers as I go. Make certain you get a thin film over the all the body and inside and outside of the neck so you don't stick a case. You will soon develop a feel for too much force if you didn't use enough lube and pull the case out before it sticks.

    Dents in the shoulder don't destroy a case - they come out when you fire the round. I've shot lots of them with no problems although I won't use them for hot loads as the case capacity is slightly reduced.

    Carbide dies are fine for pistols BUT the do give a cylindrical rather than slightly tapered case - probably why they don't make them for stright walled rifle cases. Unless you shoot a tremendous lot of .444s they probably won't be worth the extra cost anyway as you would most likely have to use some lube on them anyway. Try a bit of lube on an occasinal case when you are using carbide dies and you will find it takes a lot less force to size the cases.



    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post
    Shot some of my first .44 handloads on Sunday at Birchwood. I loaded some 240 jhp for my .44 revolver & rifle, using the same load. I also tested some .44 revolver-only loads. I was happy that all the rounds I shot went BANG! I also shot some of my 38 special 125 jhp (thanks Mauserboy ); three of my .38's wouldn't go into the revolver cylinder, but besides that, all went well. I kinda did the cardinal sin and loaded 300 of the .38's without testing them first, BUT I was at my buddy's using his Dillon and kinda had the nod from him.

    After the new year I'm going to try and work up a 30.06 load. I'm afraid I'll probably dent a lot of cases figuring out the lube process, but I've got a lot of '06 brass.

    Btw, do they make carbide .444 dies, since its a straight walled case?

    Tim
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  9. #9
    Member Akheloce's Avatar
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    Default

    As for lubing your bottle neck cases, I really like Imperial Case wax for the initial full length sizing (the Hornady stuff is just as good IMHO). It doesn't seem to gall the cases like can happen with a lube pad. I just smear some in the palm of my hand and roll the cases around, giving a REALLY light coat to the base, and a little around the neck. I pull the expander ball out and give a good coat to it as well at the start of the resizing process. I have found that only every 4th or 5th needs to be well lubed when using wax.

    After they've been shot in the rifle I'm loading for, I just neck size and lube with a spray of Hornady One Shot. I just lightly spray a tray full of brass at an angle from the top down... wait about a minute, and start neck sizing. Always smooth, no dented necks, and no stuck cases.

    Good luck, 30-06 was the cartridge I cut my teeth on, and continues to be a lot of fun to load for.

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