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Thread: Trail Cameras??

  1. #1
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default Trail Cameras??

    anyone have some experience with these things, i've got a salmon stream i'd like to set one up on for about two months and see whats going on in there. any imput on how effective they are, how long batteries last, number of pictures they take, sensitive...ect.

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    I have always bought the cheap models because I have had bears rip them off trees and open them up. I have three and lost one this year. I usually set them up on mineral licks or game trails and usually never around bait so as to encourage bears but they seem to have a natural curiousity for them at times and break them. I have lost two in the last two years. The cheap models use 35 mm film and use only Fuji because Kodak jams the camera. In warm weather they will last for about a month but in cold weather they do not last very long(maybe a week depending on how cold it is 30+ degrees). The ones I have use either 8 AA batteries or 8 C batteries. I like the one using the C batteries because they tend to last longer. The cameras I use are the cheapest ones Cabelas sells (about $70). If one gets broken then you are not out much. The camera that I lost this year was on a moose and deer trail and nowhere near a bait and a bear came and bit into it and broke the camera. That would have hurt if I had spent $200-400 for some of the better models.
    The only down side to these cameras are that they are slow to snap the picture and I have gotten half deer at times. So you want to try to set it up looking down a trail rather then across it because the animal may already be past when the camera snaps the picture and then you have a nice picture of the scenery. Good luck because it is a lot of fun to see what you can capture on film.
    If you take the woods out of the woodsman you have nothing left but a man in the woods.

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    thanks for the heads up, all good points. i'd be running it in july so temps would be pretty decent and it would be near a stream hopefully the bears might not find it fun. you know how that goes though. how far away does the camera take a picture do i need to be right on top of the bears or can it be 20 yards or so?

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    Member akpredator's Avatar
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    I found a good web site the other day that they have tested a good number of game cameras and compared the different models side to side . Check it out at http://www.chasingame.com/home.htm . it will probley answer alot of the questions you might have becouse depending on the model you deside to go with all the different factors (snap speed, flash distance, battery life, etc.) will varry.

    Hope this helps

    Todd
    LOVE MY LITTLE SKULL CLEANERS

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    Member Roger's Avatar
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    You should have been in Walmart this spring , They had the 35 mm trail cameras for $10 on the discount counter I bought all 15 of them . I use the digital at my bait stands and put them in a bear proof camera box Maineguide is right bears love them you lose 1 $120 camera you find a better way to protect. I also have the solar charger. The 35 mm cameras I put on trails in the spring when I'm looking for moose for the fall and go get them every 3 weeks and put fresh batteries and film.

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    thanks guys i'm looking at that review page.

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    The distance on mine varies but like I said I have found you get better results if you position the camera looking down a trail. The cheap cameras I use have caught moose at about 20 yards in the dark. But they work best in about ten yards. I think the bears go after them because film does have a smell. With just starting out I advise the cheap cameras until you get a feel for what is going to happen to them. I have never used mine with brown bear but like I said the blacks we deal with have done enough damage. I have a picture of the top of the head and ear of the bear that busted my last camera. The "Wanted" posters haven't brought any leads yet.
    If you take the woods out of the woodsman you have nothing left but a man in the woods.

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