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Thread: A Recipe For Chili "Bearde"

  1. #1
    hap
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    Default A Recipe For Chili "Bearde"

    I have been making this for years with all sorts of critters, but bear is probably the best. I have used muskox, goat, deer, moose, caribou and others I have forgotten...

    1 bear cubed

    masa harina, about 2 pounds

    Equal volume of canned tomatillos

    5-6 large onions cubed

    garlic cloves... lots! I usually use at least several complete heads for 6 gallons

    cilantro... washed fresh, chopped right down to the bases at least 6-8 bundles

    peppers... use lots of variety in green-colored ones like Anaheim, poblano, jalapeno, and the hotter ones if you really like it that way. I use about 4-5 pounds for a 6-gallon pot. (No bell peppers!)

    Chicken stock or bullion

    Oregano, lots of fresh or dried, about 3/4 cup dried, double for fresh.

    1/2teaspoon ground cloves

    Start with one bear, boned and cut in cubes of about 1" or a little bigger. Setting aside the backstraps and T-loins for other meals is not a bad idea...

    Shake the pieces of meat in masa harina (corn flour) and brown in oil in a hot skillet. As the pan loads are browned transfer them to a huge pot.

    Add canned tomatillos to the pot roughly equal in volume to the meat and start heating it all together. Break the tomatillos open as you pour them in.

    Clean the pan and fry the diced onions in shifts. If you try to get the onions translucent with too many in the pan they do not get hot enough fast enough and the flavor suffers. Keep the pan loads small and hot. Do not burn them though! Add to the big pot as you go.

    Do the garlic after the onions and be extra careful not to burn it. Onions and garlic get really bitter if you burn them.

    Add the chopped cilantro, oregano and clove.

    Roast the peppers. I do it under the broiler, but it can be done on an open range, the grill, a small hibachi... anything hot enough to blister the skins. The peppers will swell and the thin clear membrane will swell and burn and look terrible. That is perfect.

    Close up the poasted peppers in a heavy brown paper sack and put the sack in a warm oven. The peppers will cock a bit and become much easier to peel and seed. I try to get the seeds out, but I am not going to lose sleep if I miss some, even quite a few. Be careful with the really hot peppers and do not scratch your face! Urinating can be "special" too...

    Add the peppers to the chili as you go.

    If the chili gets too stiff, thin with chicken stock or hot water with a bullion cube, or some paste in it.

    Stir well and let rest for a few hours of bubbling very gently. Salt and pepper to taste. It will take a lot of each!


    Then we put the chili in jars, quarts usually, and pressure process like you do any meat or fish in quarts.

    To serve we just empty a jar in a pan and heat, or microwave. Flour tortillas, shredded cheddar and/or jack cheese, sour cream, salsa, refried beans, whatever you like goes great with it...
    art

  2. #2
    Member Tolman24's Avatar
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    Default Approx weight

    What is the approximate weight of the bear meat? I may try this with a mixed batch of moose and venison as I love spicy chili. I have about 40 lbs of roasted hatch green chili that would fill the bill with some jalapenos thrown in. Thanks for the recipe

  3. #3
    hap
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    I did two bears this past year in two batches. They were about 6 gallons apiece and very heavy to meat. The yield was about 24 quarts canned quarts each. We ate a LOT of it while getting ready for canning and added more stuff as we went.

    Neither bear was huge and backstraps and t-loins were not included. Would be guessing, but thinking I started with 40# per batch. I never measure anything when cooking so I have to guess about what I think it felt like!

    I have not had any complaints about the stuff.

    One thing I did with one batch was to can half and then add significant heat to the second batch with some serious peppers. It did not add nearly as much final heat as expected...
    good luck!
    art

  4. #4

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    Thanks Hap for the reciepe. I will try it with deer. I just saw where you sent me the pm. I had not had time to check them in a few days. Sounds like my kind of eating.

  5. #5

    Default thin chili

    never thin chili with water or chicken stock, only use dark beer to thin chili, you will see a world of difference in the taste

  6. #6
    hap
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    eagleclaw
    You are correct on adding taste with the dark beer... Cheap whiskey adds quite a bit, too... But the color is a problem. Chili verde is supposed to be green and I have been known to add a bunch of dried parsley to add color. It does not add flavor as far as I can tell. Maybe wait till St Paddy's day and add green beer?
    Thanks, and flavor really is the only thing that should matter.
    art

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    Thanks for posting the recipe Art... This stuff is awesome.

  8. #8
    hap
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    Now you have no excuse for doing your own **** bear!

  9. #9
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default q's

    hap - couple of questions for you, Why don't you use bell peppers? 1 bear equaling 40lbs just doesn't sound right. While I have yet to take a black bear I can't see how one would only produce 40 lbs.

  10. #10
    hap
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    Bell peppers are just a sorry excuse for a pepper... They add nothing and do not respond to cooking like the other peppers.

    As to the weight of bears... Most scales will show a critter yields about 40% of live weight in boneless meat, and bears come in a little below that. Unfortunately bear ribs are not worth playing with, so that is subtracted. Then, setting aside loins and T-loins from a bear leaves a pile significantly under 40% of live weight. Spring bears of 150-200 pounds live weight are pretty ordinary.

    I also am big on removing the vast majority of tendons. In bears that adds up to a lot of weight. The 40 pounds is probably a good estimate...
    thanks
    art

  11. #11
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Default

    hap that recipe is very similar to one of my dad's that i have used for "chile bearde" too. might even be posted on the forum someplace .
    i have never used an entire bear i will try browning in masa, that's a great idea.
    one suggestion i have is that cilantro should generally be added just before serving so as not to lose the fresh flavor. not practical if the goal is to put up chili for later, but a thought.
    in smaller batches fresh tomatillos are the bomb!

    found this in an old thread:


    DAD'S CHILE VERDE (alaskan chili bearde')
    2 1/2 # cubed pork (bear)
    2 cloves garlic
    26 oz tomatillos (a couple big cans, more or less)
    12 anaheim/pasilla chiles, roasted and peeled. ( or 2 big cans ortega peeled chiles)
    1-2 onions, large dice
    cumin (generous) 1 1/2-2 T to start
    oregano (less) couple of t
    cinnamon (some) a few good shakes
    chile powder (to taste) easy does it
    2 cans hominy
    1/2 bunch cilantro
    1/2 lemon
    Brown pork with garlic. Add chiles, tomatillos, onions, and seasonings. Simmer 1 1/2 - 2 hours. Add hominy, cilantro, and lemon juice... simmer another 30 minutes. Serve on flour tortillas.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  12. #12
    hap
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    Dave
    You almost got me there! Hominy?!?!? Surely you jest!

    I agree completely on fresh cilantro and like to use lots of it with the final serving, but use lots just in case it is not available... And cooked, it is better than none.

    Do you have any idea where dried tomatillos might be available? Seems that would make them a cheaper commodity and shipping all that water is a bummer for something to be cooked to mush anyway.

    Garlic is real sensitive to burning and I have found I need to fry it alone to ensure I keep a good eye on it. Otherwise it makes some nasty bitter spots.

    I have used both cinnamon and cloves and actually I usually do both...
    Thanks for the comments!
    art

  13. #13
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Default

    what, you got a problem with hominy?
    never heard of dried tomatillos.
    are you off the road system?
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  14. #14
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    Default

    searching up chili and had to bump this thread up before its burial

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