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Thread: obstacles

  1. #1

    Default obstacles

    decided to take a short break from the game tonight to introduce obstacles during the retrieve. As you can tell from the picture, "Banks" didn't mind at all. Banks is three months old and is on track to be a good ole gun dog.



  2. #2

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    That's awesome !!
    On your next picture I want to see some of that artificial marsh grass and cat tail foilage in your hallway. LOL

  3. #3
    Member JuliW's Avatar
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    NICE!

    I like the 'batman' shadow on his chest in the second picture.

    Juli
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  4. #4

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    I didn't even notice the batman shadow until you mentioned it...haha. Wetland...thats a good idea but not sure if I can pull off the marsh grass....maybe I can knock the Christmas tree over since it's already leaning then just let Banks tear through that for a while...I'm sure the old lady would really appreciate it.

    since both of yall are trainers I was wondering how yall incorporate confidence building into the training plan. As silly as it sounds I've heard of people taking the pup to the playground and having him go down the slide with the trainer as a way to build confidence.

    Richie

  5. #5
    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richie View Post
    I didn't even notice the batman shadow until you mentioned it...haha. Wetland...thats a good idea but not sure if I can pull off the marsh grass....maybe I can knock the Christmas tree over since it's already leaning then just let Banks tear through that for a while...I'm sure the old lady would really appreciate it.

    since both of yall are trainers I was wondering how yall incorporate confidence building into the training plan. As silly as it sounds I've heard of people taking the pup to the playground and having him go down the slide with the trainer as a way to build confidence.

    Richie

    I'd suggest adding some decoys. Nothing funnier than seeing someone who has never had their dog retrieve anything in the middle of a spread. I had a buddy who talked his dog up and down, when he finally took her hunting, she retrieved all but 3 decoys before she finally got the duck. It'd be a good thing to have the pup seeing often enough to learn NOT to retrieve them.



    Give some examples of what you're talking about as far as confidence or any issues you're experiencing or foreseeing. I'm not really sure how to help you out without some specifics.

  6. #6

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    I'm not foreseeing any issues with confidence since this little guy has been jumping off the recliner, couch or anything else that he can climb on. I was just curious as to how the trainers face an issue and adjust their training program.

    we've been throwing some retrieves short, in and past the spread and he is doing pretty good so far.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richie View Post
    I didn't even notice the batman shadow until you mentioned it...haha. Wetland...thats a good idea but not sure if I can pull off the marsh grass....maybe I can knock the Christmas tree over since it's already leaning then just let Banks tear through that for a while...I'm sure the old lady would really appreciate it.

    since both of yall are trainers I was wondering how yall incorporate confidence building into the training plan. As silly as it sounds I've heard of people taking the pup to the playground and having him go down the slide with the trainer as a way to build confidence.

    Richie
    Best way to build confidence is to let him be successful in everything he does at this age. Be consistent.

  8. #8
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    Just go for long walks in the woods. Good bonding time. Great for pup to learn to negotiate his way around and through obstacles. Probably the least thing a person needs to worry about. Don't worry. Be happy. The one word for you to keep in mind now, and for quite some time is FUN!

    Good luck, and enjoy the journey!

    Jim

  9. #9

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    I like to get new dogs in training walking on a leash or long line. To a point to where they follow my lead. Then I start introducing them to different situations that will allow the dog to learn social skills or get use to things they will see out training or on a days hunt . Having them walking with me allows me to prevent them from balking and hesitating. They are simply following the pack leader and the one they trust. I introduce with confidence and encourage the pup. But I never beg or tell the dog "its ok" and cater to the dogs nervous behavior. In most cases the pup will sniff and figure things out on there own. Going on walks with your pup to different places and allowing them to explore in a safe manner will do wonders for your pups confidence.
    Teach don't Test
    The meaning of this is often misunderstood. For example....you wouldn't put a pup right into a kennel and expect them to be happy about it. The same as you wouldn't take a pup out and shoot a shotgun over him in order to see how he reacts to gunfire. You have to condition dogs to these things.
    In your training...you need to break things down and expose them little bits at a time. Doing so will prevent your pup from being overwhelmed on what you are asking of them.
    As others have mentioned already. Set up things that your pup will be successful at.
    Number one rule....Remember if you are confident in what you are teaching and have a way of simplifying when pup runs into trouble you will do fine.

  10. #10

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    this is a good dialogue between a lot of experienced folks and would like for it to continue (as I'm writing this, "Banks" decided that I needed my croc...haha).

    Water Introduction: I'm sure a lot of yall have been in this boat before and would like to hear your experience with introducing a dog to water after a long winter.

    This is the second dog that I've trained so far and luckily I work with a guy that has trained labs all his life. I'm trying to learn from as many sources as possible

    thanks,

    Richie

  11. #11
    Member JuliW's Avatar
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    I have raised two pups that I got in late fall and mid winter....Water intro was done in a solid bottomed, warm lake (early June)...First I had one of my kids hold the pup, while I threw a few bumpers for the older dog(s)...This got the youngster riled up of course....then, on lead, I walked the pup along the shoreline, wading into the water with my hip boots on - first at a walk, then running/jogging....within a few minutes they were pulling at the lead to go swimming on their own and play with their older companions....

    If you use an older dog to help intro your pup to water, be sure not to allow the youngster to follow the older dog on a retrieve....you don't want a tussle or aggression toward the pup to occur in the water...

    I also had a pup, that @ 9 weeks, decided to literally 'leap' into the end of the swim by pond at the hay flats..she was standing there, checking things out and I had no idea she'd decide to take the flying leap...she of course immediately went under water..within a matter of a couple of seconds I had grabbed her and dried her off as best as I could...this was in early-mid May, so water was still pretty cold......she never had any issues with water when she was older, but for a while was more uncertain about entering it...After that I was more careful to make certain water introductions were well controlled....

    Juli
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  12. #12
    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    Just like Juli said, I will put on either hip boots or waders and get out there with the dog. Shallow is best at first so the dog can get used to the water. If you don't have any other dogs to use (join a club and you shouldn't have a problem finding someone to help you out), you can gradually work to deeper water where the pup will start swimming while you're walking around with it. Personally, once the pup is used to the water and it isn't an issue to get in, I'll start throwing really high energy fun bumpers in shallow enough water to still walk. Once the dog has realized it can still have fun and retrieve in the water, I'll GRADUALLY start tossing them a bit further. If you have any issues, don't be afraid to take a few steps back and get comfortable again. Obviously a lab that's afraid of water is going to experience some training issues.

    Juli and Baron, how many have you seen that are just plain afraid of water? I've had one, ever, that was nervous. He'd literally hold on to my legs with his front two paws every time I got out past where he could touch the bottom. It took about a week, but he finally got the hang of it.

  13. #13
    Member JuliW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DucksAndDogs View Post
    Juli and Baron, how many have you seen that are just plain afraid of water? I've had one, ever, that was nervous. He'd literally hold on to my legs with his front two paws every time I got out past where he could touch the bottom. It took about a week, but he finally got the hang of it.

    I've had a golden that disliked water on the first couple of all her retrieves..after the first one or two she was all right, but would rather not get wet..LOL....


    Juli
    Taxidermy IS art!
    www.alaskawildliferugs.com
    Your mount is more than a trophy, it's a memory. Relive The Memory!

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by DucksAndDogs View Post
    Juli and Baron, how many have you seen that are just plain afraid of water?
    Some... though they were able to overcome their apprehension. Most just need a different approach. A softer approach(one on one with me in waders) or others respond to a more gong ho approach with a group of retrievers. I had three that had to be paddled out to a small island and left there to figure it out. With me supervising of course. LOL

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    I'm another one who will choose the right (warm) day in the right place, a gravel bottomed pond or lake with gradual depth. And then it's that fun,fun, fun stuff again. I also like to take a more experienced dog - or four! - along for the fun and games. It helps pup enjoy it even more. My oldest dog is locally referred to as "the swimming instructor."

    If you find yourself in the right place at the right time and don't have your hip boots, too bad for you, just wade right in and get the job done, you won't be sorry later.

    Jim in Fairbanks where I'm no longer certain what sunshine and open water look like?

  16. #16
    Member 3CBRS's Avatar
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    Taking pups for walks is a great way for them to learn about new situations, places, obstacles, and build self confidence. I am intentionally noisier in the house with pups around too -- cupboard doors, rattling pots/pans & closing doors more loudly than usual.

    Lots of good tips on introducing water too -- don't rush or force it. People worry about that too much at times & can end up souring an impressionable pup by rushing to water introduction. I've had pups born late Aug.-late Sept. & the only one who had problems with water. She was forced into cold water loaded with chunks of ice early in the spring. My fault for not putting the foot down & saying "absolutely not" in that situation. She was hesitant about water for life, but would always go in. Another pup was born the end of Sept. & never saw bare ground, liquid water (other than in bowls or sometimes splashing around in a couples inches of lukewarm water in the bathtub [supervised of course]), or grass until April. She never has had a problem with water & thinks the bigger the flying leap, the more fun it is. Once again, it was not forced.

    If you're interested in training classes, the Fairbanks Retriever Club's "spring" training classes start Feb. 21st. We're also considering holding a one-day retriever puppy training workshop for little pups. If anyone is interested please let me know.

    Karen

  17. #17
    Member tjm's Avatar
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    karen....shouldn't your handle be "4cbrs" now...
    ------------------------------------------------
    pull my finger....

  18. #18
    Member 3CBRS's Avatar
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    Hi Toshiro,

    Well THAT is what Ak River Rat said too -- or it should be "too many cbrs" I do have 4 of them right now, but Tule's getting pretty frail. Those are all great pictures of Murdock & looks like you're going to end with a 'Peake of the larger size. The new dog, Ben, fits into that category too!

    Karen

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