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Thread: Osprey vs Sea Sport

  1. #1

    Default Osprey vs Sea Sport

    To me the Osprey looks a little more rough water friendly than the Sea Sport. I'm looking at a 24' Osprey, and also a 27' Sea Sport. Obviously the Sea Sport is more money, but given the sea worthy reputation of the Osprey, does the extra 3' of the Sea Sport make that much difference? Or does 3' make that much difference in any kind of a boat? It would usually be 2, max 4 people fishing. The Osprey has a 5.7L Mericruiser, and the Sea Sport a Volvo diesel. I know I am getting a good "deal" on the Osprey, as it comes with downriggers, pot puller, Wallas diesel stove, etc., but haven't seen the particulars on the Sea Sport yet.

    Getting a better boat is more important than the money. I am new to ocean boating, so was thinking also that learning the ropes in the Osprey would be wise, and figure out if I want more from there (maybe someday a big old Glacier Craft). The diesel is a big draw for the Sea Sport, though. Thanks for your time.

  2. #2
    Member bhollis's Avatar
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    I previously owned a 26' Osprey with the long cabin, and currently own a 30' SeaSport Voyager.

    First, you should know that SeaSport bought out Osprey several years ago, and currently builds both lines of boats.

    IMHO, the fit and finish on the SeaSports is a little better, but otherwise two lines of boats are pretty much on a par.

    Both lines of boats are very sturdy and seaworthy.

    But the two boats you've mentioned are definitely apples and oranges. Depending on which SeaSport 27 you're talking about, the Seasport's additional three feet in length will either give you considerably more cockpit space for fishing, or considerably more cabin space for cruising. Also, since the SeaSport's bigger and heavier, it will probably give you a better ride.

    As for the engines, you can expect the diesel engine to give you significantly better fuel economy than the gas engine (although this will be offset to some extent by the larger size of the SeaSport). The flipside is that the maintenance and repair costs of the diesel will be significantly higher than the gas engine.

    Really comes down to what you're looking for, and how much you need/want the additional three feet in length.

  3. #3
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    Bhollis passed along some good comments and I would like to add that unless you are going to get a slip for the boat a diesel truck is dang near required if you have to tow either any distance.
    Tennessee

  4. #4
    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    I would also consider the safety issue with inboard gas vs. diesel as well in my decision. I think a 3/4 ton truck with a decent gas motor would tow either of these boats fine.
    2009 Seawolf 31'
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  5. #5

    Default In addition...

    You could get on the their websites and get the factory specs as in comparing deadrise (big factor in how a boat rides), weight, etc. That would help determine ride issues.

    Typically bigger is better!
    Jim

  6. #6
    Member FISHFACE's Avatar
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    The two boats have very different characteristics. we have had a 24' explorer and a 30' offshore ( both sea sports) and tested a 30' osprey at the factory. The sea sport will ride better in the chop but will have much more roll on anchor. The osprey is just the opposite, it's much nicer on anchor but in the chop it not even close to the same ride. Both are very nice boats, can't go wrong.

    good luck

  7. #7

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    Talking to a Mechanic; The Osprey has a nasty history of retaining water in the transom on the first and early models. Lots of them for sale on the internet -WHY???

  8. #8
    Member FISHFACE's Avatar
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    they also had a issue with their stringers not being in the same spots. when you went to mount something there was nothing to mount to, at least that's what SS told me when they started making osprey.

  9. #9
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    Default I Agree With FISHFACE

    From both my own experience in riding on both brands and from talking to guides using both Osprey and SeaSport over in Sitka - the SS can be pretty "jumpy" in the trough compared to the Osprey. I wasn't in tough weather on either brand of boat so I don't have any personal observations but according to the guides the SS was a better ride in the rough stuff.

    IMHO, I preferred the cockpit area layout of the Osprey for fishing and would be inclined to go with it with the equipment that is included.

  10. #10
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    Default Osprey Ride

    Big Jim - deadrise isn't the only factor in how a boat rides. I had a 26 Osprey LC before my current boat, a Shamrock 270 Mackinaw. The Mack has less deadrise aft but a much smoother ride in a chop. I attribute this to two things, 1) the Osprey has chine and keel flats that help in lift (and less roll at anchor) but slap on impact in a chop. And 2), the Mack has an inboard with straight shaft drive so the engine weight is midship. If you go on the Yahoo Osprey forum, one question asked a while back was what was the best improvement on your boat. A lot of folks came back with an air ride seat so that tells you something. My ride is way more comfortable now, though I should mention a 3rd factor, speed. I cruise about 4 kts slower, about 22kts vs. 26 in the Osprey so impact in a chop would be more noticeable at the higher speed. One other thing, the Osprey seemed to wallow at intermediate speeds between hull speed a full planing speed so going much slower than about 20 kts had the bow way up in the air, not real good for visability. The Mack with shallower deadrise seems fine in the teens when it gets really sloppy.

  11. #11
    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Default Deadrise

    I have noticed the same thing about deadrise. I have heard from others that the deadrise at the transom is what dictates your ride, but I have not experienced this. My boat only had 14 degrees at the transom, but I have a friend that has a SeaSport Voyager and we tend to like to run about the same speed in rough conditions. I put some trim out and cut he seas with the nose when it gets rough, but this is a pretty simple adjustment. I still want to try trading boats some time and seeing how the other boat feels in identical conditions, but when I have my wife and three daughters, age 2-13 on board and he tells me I am running as fast as he is comfortable in his boat, it seems the ride must be similar.

    Getting back on topic, I think what this means is that you should run each boat if possible to see what you think. While that would be hard to do here right now, you may be able to talk them out of rides at Boondocks in WA if they think you are interesting in buying.
    2009 Seawolf 31'
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