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Thread: TREKKING poles!

  1. #1
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Default TREKKING poles!

    okay ... seems a ski pole would be better then some of the telescoping trekking junk i am seeing lately? not much of a selection to look at up here what is the preferred pole? and WHY
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  2. #2

    Default I was skeptical at first

    and thought a trekking pole was a "sissy" (nice word for it) pole. I bought a set of black diamonds this summer and used sheep hunting. While I did not like 2 poles, my partner and I found that one pole each worked very well and were very beneficial to have and use! I forgot the exact model I bought, but they were the ones with the good "lock" system for each section.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by northway View Post
    and thought a trekking pole was a "sissy" (nice word for it) pole. I bought a set of black diamonds this summer and used sheep hunting. While I did not like 2 poles, my partner and I found that one pole each worked very well and were very beneficial to have and use! I forgot the exact model I bought, but they were the ones with the good "lock" system for each section.
    I agree. I dislike two trekking poles as I always like to have one hand free. Really for me the poles only come out when on hills anyways, never understood using them on the flat too much. However after personally breaking one trekking pole with a pack load of goat this year at a very non-convient moment trying to regain my balance on the mountainside with 100+ lb pack and having a buddy break another trekking pole using it to self arrest on the slippery grassy mountainside I beginning to look for a better option for myself. So this November when goat hunting with BRWNBR he let me run one if his ice axes. They are hell for stout. Also I only use one climbing aid so an ice axe made good sense to me. Being able to hack out bumps in the tundra for a tent space and self arrest when purposefully sliding down a snow slope with a pack load of goat an not worrying if the equiptment is going to snap is a huge plus IMO. So Santa already brought me a 90 CM Black Diamond ice axe this year. My wife still prefers to run two trekking poles and will never carry much more that 75 lbs in her pack so the strain she will exert on the poles will likely never break. I still use my trekking poles for snowshoeing and skinning up to snowboard down with my splitboard. I prefer them over ski poles for these activities as its nice to be able to fold them up to 18" tall and stuff them in my daypack for the ride down.

  4. #4
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm another recent convert, and I love my trekking poles. I just ordered a set this morning to give my dad for Christmas.

    The Black Diamond flick-lock system is the way to go, IMO. Seems much more reliable than other twist-lock poles I looked at. I've put a LOT of weight on them numerous without failure. I've got the BD Trail Trekking Poles... you can find them online for about $80 with shipping to AK. I also like that they have the extended foam grips which are handy on steep country.

    I use one or two depending on terrain. One pole worked out best hunting goats so I had my other hand free, but I used two poles a lot sheep hunting where the terrain was less vegetated and not quite as steep. I think they make a huge difference packing heavy loads and keeping my footing/balance in rough country. Also were nice for river/stream crossings.

    I use them as poles for snowshoeing and back-country xc skiing as well. They've also been handy as improv shooting sticks and holding up tarps when making a quick shelter while hunting.
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  5. #5
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    Default Poles

    I agree completely- the locking system on the Black Diamonds is the best. I have a pair of their B/C ski poles, and my hiking sticks are the REI twist-lock system, which stinks. The only way to keep them from collapsing under a heavy load, which is when you need them the most, is to tighten them so snugly that it's nearly impossible to adjust them. I'm going to get the B.D. trekking poles ASAP.

    One difference I notices between the ski poles and the trekking poles is that the trekking poles compress down to a smaller overall length, which is a real consideration if you're traveling by air.

    I find the poles to be most useful when packing heavy loads downhill, and also when crossing streams on logs or slippery rocks. And also when fending off angry moose and brown bears!

  6. #6

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    I should add Vince that both trekking poles that I had break were made by Leki so might want to steer clear of that name brand. I think the BD trekking poles may be a little better, however still glad to have the ice axe when getting BRWNBR's goat out of the hole it chose to die in. Being able to swing the axe into the hillside for something to grab onto at one point when there wasn't good rock or alder holds proved to be priceless.

  7. #7

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    Another thumbs up for the BD poles. I've only had mine for several months but have been very pleased thus far. As previously mentioned, they really come in handy when going downhill with weight on your.

    Last December I got a wild hair to go hunt feral goats along the NaPali Coastline in Kaua'i. Never have I seen such "vertical" country. The narrow hiking trail that winds along those steep cliffs (pictured below) was scary enough for a person who is not that fond of heights. Add in the clay soils and rainfall and it made for some greasy conditions that raised the pucker factor. I was cursing myself the entire time for not having trekking poles to help with the footing (I eventually cut a walking stick and even that made a huge difference).
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  8. #8
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default Trekking Poles

    I use the two pole set, Black Diamond Carbons (three piece telescopic lock) after using two on my hunt, I would not do it any other way. You can turn them upside down and poke the tips thru the eyelets of a tarp and 550 cord and you have a spike tent, or you can make a meat/ hide rack at camp with them. Most of all, coming down on steep vertical you have four points instead of just two or three, works good in shale and crossing creeks and streams. There are more uses for them too, I could go on and on, but don't want to bore everyone...



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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by kahahawai View Post
    ...There are more uses for them too, I could go on and on, but don't want to bore everyone...
    Sheep hunters gun rack


    Vince....
    I converted to a 2 poler this year and it's great. I had been using one in the past. A good set of Black Diamonds and your good to go. Mine are 2 piece aluminum, one flick lock. The telescopic poles are very versatile in that you can change the lenght depending on what you are doing. Nice and long for wide creek crossing and "pole vaulting" if need be. Or, when side hilling being able to have a shorter one on the uphill side like in this pic. I can really move out with poles on this kind of terrain. I mostly hang on to mine and use them like an ice axe... well ok a cane ... but you get the idea....


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    Default

    THREAD HIJACK....

    Kahahawai, I just went and looked at your photo album and took a good look at that ram again, WHAT A HOG!! That pic of your hand half way around the horn really shows how beefy that boy is. I remember reading about your hunt getting that ram. THAT, was one epic, ultimate sheep hunt. Nice job....

    Ok, hijack over....

  11. #11
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Vince I have been using the Black Diamond Carbon Fiber Alpines with the flip lock system and have been very happy with them. In my opinion it is well worth the extra money for the carbon fiber as it does not transmit the impact shock of the pole hitting the rocks and ground like an aluminum pole often does. You can find them on sale on the internet here and there for $80-$90 which isn't bad at all for carbon fiber.
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  12. #12
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I am a big o' boy and I tend to lean on the poles a bit. I have the BD countour eliptical aluminum poles and they have taken the punishment. I did multiple trips up and down the mountain carrying 100lb plus loads on my goat hunt this year and had zero problems w/ them! To give you an idea, I am 250+ lbs so add on 100lb pack and you got 350 pounds leaning on that thing! I also "pole vault" over obstacles w/ them and they just keep taking the punishment!

    Like Snyd I tend to keep my hands on top of the pole and use it like a ....cane... Works great and I feel like Dr. Octavious from Spiderman scampering across the boulder fields.

  13. #13
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Default

    wow sounds like black dimonds.... i went to sports athority, frontier and beaver sports and nearly broke every thing i played with... though.... when i fiddle with stuff.. most clerks have abject terror on thier faces..
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  14. #14
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
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    Another flick lock fan here. I use them for skiing, trekking, even to hold up my little tent. They rock!
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  15. #15
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    Default BD Flicklock

    Another vote for Black Diamond Flick Lock.

    Used Lekis in the past, wife's pair is Leki from a while back. They slip over time. Flick locks are great.

    Just get plain jane aluminum ones. Two piece. Their Traverse poles are usually the cheapest. I use them to ski and hike with.

  16. #16

    Default gossamers?

    Light trek 4s, anybody used these? The weight of them makes me drool. <7oz per pair.

  17. #17
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I love light gear as much as anyone but at some point you are sacrificing strength.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I love light gear as much as anyone but at some point you are sacrificing strength.
    That's why I'm asking, it's cheaper and easier to gain experience through other peoples effort

  19. #19

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    The Black Diamond Flick Locks are the way to go.. I have used other brands and even ski poles for hiking.. Really like my flick locks...

    Nothing worse than planting a pole and having it collaspe on you, especially with a load on your back....

  20. #20
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    I don't leave home with out two poles.
    For the folks that like ice axes, Barney's used to carry a 'walking ice axe" with an extendable bottom, might give them a call.

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