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Thread: First fish? Fly caught, wild Alaska stream...

  1. #1
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default First fish? Fly caught, wild Alaska stream...

    Do you remember your first fly caught fish?

    I got hooked fly fishing here ...but maybe like many others, went quite a few days without catching anything at first. Finally on a multiday, early Spring camping/hiking/flyfishing trip with a friend, I landed my first wild Rainbow. Very small stream, nymph pattern, working a deep pool below a bend, casting upstream. The line took a turn and it was fish-on.
    For me, hiking in, working that nymph pattern on a small stream or isolated stretch, is still fly fishing at its best. After that first fish, I was hooked.

    Granted, fly fishing isn't easy to learn. It isn't as productive as the spin fishing techniques I learned in Florida. But something about this first catch - I don't know... was more appealing. I don't recall my first spin-caught, or bait-caught fish. But I remember this fine Rainbow.

    Any special memories about your first fly caught fish in Alaska?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_4382_2.jpg  

  2. #2

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    My first fly caught fish was when I was 10 at Cheney Lake.....gesh that was a long time ago!!!
    "The Tug is the Drug"

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    Member egreife's Avatar
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    Default way back when

    I got invited to a "private" club lake in Colorado. Bought a $32 K-mart starter kit and caught a bunch of hungry rainbows. I was hooked! Purchased a $65 5wt, 7.5 foot Cabelos rod kit with a $35 Pflueger reel. The rod went together great and I still have both the rod and reel that I use on the Chena River every year and slay those grayling!! I've learned that you catch just as many fish, have just as good of time and can enjoy the memories with a low cost outfit as much as with one that costs big bucks.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Don't remember my first fish on a flyrod, but I bet it was a stocker rainbow and I bet it was at beach lake
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Mine was a grayling caught in Crescent Lake, right at the outlet. If I recall, it was on a "renegade" sometime during the late 70's. That is still my "go to" dry. Dad probably has a slide of that somewhere. Might have to have him break out the slide projector.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  6. #6
    Member liv2fish87's Avatar
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    Default On the kenai

    My first "real" catch on a fly rod was on a guide trip with dan meyers about 4 years ago and it was right at guardrail. I had a boat the next week and have been going back almost 3 times a month since, have been to alot of other rivers but theres something about that blue water and huge bows.
    Go Fish

  7. #7
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    Caught my first fish on the fly at sheep creek in the summer of '08. About a half mile down from the bridge. Was using an egg imitation and now realize that i was doing it COMPLETELY wrong but hooked a nice little grayling anyway (musta been one of the dumb ones). Been trying to soak up all the knowledge of the sport that i can even since. My goal this summer is to get all 5 species of salmon on a fly rod!
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

  8. #8
    Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    Mine was on Montana just downstream of the Parks Hwy bridge late in the season fishing solo! It was low water, so I stood on a sand bank a couple feet above the river and made my first cast with a pheasant tail nymph. Fish hit, bank gave way and I ended up face down in the sand at the waters edge. Sand in my eyes and feeling stupid, I grapped my rod that was slowly drifting downstream and landed the most beautiful 10" rainbow I'd ever seen. I hiked out to the north and found a small marijuana grow operation...Welcome to Alaska!

  9. #9
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
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    Default First 50 or so?

    My first fly caught fish turned into a first bunch of fish in a couple of days. My Dad, brother and I hiked to Lower Fuller Lake when I was 11 or 12. I had an eagle claw fly/ spinning combo rod with an old Martin reel. The lake must have just been stocked because the grayling destroyed every fly we brought (which couldn't have been more than a dozen or so) and then switched to small egg hooks with bits of our shirts stuck to them. The fish weren't big, but they were ravenous. We actually caught a couple on bare hooks!

    Talk about getting hooked on fly-fishing!

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by liv2fish87 View Post
    have been to alot of other rivers but theres something about that blue water and huge bows.
    Amen to that brother!!!!
    "The Tug is the Drug"

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Big Fat Dolly Varden. finger Bay, Adak Alaska...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default

    I was fresh off the plane in Kotz. First time I had ever been to Alaska. Ordered a Cabelas starter outfit and practiced in the gravel parking lot at the Fire Dept. Man, did I suck. Anyway, a few months go by and I have found jack in Kotz to flyfish for. I fly my brother and best friend up from NC and we take our first float trip on a river 80 miles N of Kotz. Seven days and 36 miles of what ever. Hell, we didn't know or care, we just went. I was catching some dollies on spinners, enjoying the scenery, and just in general looking all over like the tourist I was. Day three we hit a 12' rock wall in a sharp bend and rip a hole in the side of the brand new Ally canoe I had bought for the trip. My buddy and brother were in the canoe and I told them they couldn't make the turn. I am on foot walking my yellow ducky one man inflattable kayak and they hit the banks yelling. I knew they had F'd up. I get the fly rod out and try the hole we happened to be stuck beside while they fix the gash in the side of the canoe. Mostly I am just staying away from them as I was steaming that they didn't take my advice while in MY boat. I am doing some deep breathing exercises, WWJD, the whole nine. I get a dolly, perhaps 18" on a woolly bugger. HOLY SHET!!!! That was fun. Then I get another, and another, etc... So these two sorry basterds I flew up from NC now want to fish and do a crappy job on the repair. Looked like a blind monkey put the patch kit on. To this day I laugh when I see it. We all fish and fish and take turns with the only fly rod we had, my super budget Cabelas combo. Good times. After a few dollies, my first ever fish on a fly rod, life was good and I no longer cared about them wrecking my $1800 toy. It's just a boat and it was the experience and the memories that had led me to fly them up to enjoy this special place. That trip, those fish in that 10' deep emerald green pool, that moment itself, sparked an interest that grows more with each passing float trip. For a bunch of Carolina boys, there is something special about seeing 20 brown bears (one of which walked into camp during dinner time), 100+ bou, catching dozens of dollies, eating grayling gumbo, seeing sheep and a wolf, and the northern lights all at once. I can still see that lazy green river above when I close my eyes. My younger brother summed it up best as we finished off the liquor rations on the last night camped out by the confluence with the Noatak, "The coolest thing about this trip in not the fact that we have seen things for the first time, but the fact that we have seen so many things for the first time, at the same time".


    Precious memories indeed. Thanks for asking Dwight.

    This picture was taken right before my brother (under left arm) made the above quote...

    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Fly for Grayling: "Renegade"

    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    Mine was a grayling caught in Crescent Lake, right at the outlet. If I recall, it was on a "renegade" sometime during the late 70's. That is still my "go to" dry. Dad probably has a slide of that somewhere. Might have to have him break out the slide projector.
    This one (from: http://www.westfly.com/fly-pattern-r...renegade.shtml) ?

    Humor, faraway places, priceless memories - and maybe a good Grayling fly tip!
    And no, back then it wasn't about the gear was it?
    Wonderful photo, Dan!
    Last edited by 6XLeech; 12-12-2009 at 06:01. Reason: Text

  14. #14
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
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    My first fish was a Char on Unalaska Island in late '90's. I learned to cast between the buildings at Westward Seafoods from a Japanese gentleman, Masaya Mitsuhashi.
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  15. #15
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6XLeech View Post
    This one (from: http://www.westfly.com/fly-pattern-r...renegade.shtml) ?

    Humor, faraway places, priceless memories - and maybe a good Grayling fly tip!
    And no, back then it wasn't about the gear was it?
    Wonderful photo, Dan!
    That would be the fly. It is my go to fly for grayling, but works great for bows, too. I think the key is I have confidence in that fly and tend to fish it more than other patterns.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  16. #16
    Premium Member denalihunter's Avatar
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    Default Tangle Lakes - Grayling

    Was a few years ago, Tangle Lakes, 17" Grayling, #3. It took me about a day to keep the fly from catching my ear on each cast, or pick up the brush or my buddies behind me. Finally got the hang of it in the evening... tossed a perfect cast about 30 feet, the fly danced for just 4 or 5 seconds, the quick roll noted, and the line going taunt...... Then the learning curve about 'pulling' line in, instead of reeling it was a challenge! From that point on, I haven't picked up a spinning reel again.

    My son caught his first one on the Tangle River between the lakes at 3 years old! He's is becoming a professional at 6 years old!

    It is truly something everyone should try. I've had several friends at the lodge catch their first fly caught fish, and the story is the same.

    Claude
    Experience Real Alaska! www.alpinecreeklodge.com

  17. #17
    Member jmg's Avatar
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    My first fish on the fly was a brook trout in Colorado. I was still dating my wife at the time and in effort to impress her dad, I gave flyfishing a try. The brookies there stack up in the beaver ponds and will take anything, even a bare hook at times. I probably caught 30 fish that day and was hooked. I began to tie my own flies not long after that, and awhile later started working in a fly shop. Over the next several years, my father in law had to work hard to keep up with all the new flies I was tying. All he ever used before was a grey-hackled peacock. Not much else. A red tip on the tail, wind up some pecock herl, and then a grizzly hackle at the front. Easy tie and caught the trout in Colorado like crazy.

    I'm still looking to hook a king on a fly here, although I have hooked silvers, reds, hundreds of pinks, and even chums. All of them are an absolute blast. Two summers ago I caught a couple of big pinks on a 4 weight down in Hope. That was a hoot and a half.
    Never count your days, but rather, make all of your days count.

  18. #18
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Mine was a skinny little grayling on a Salcha Pink in the Chena River behind Ft. Aintwright.
    Now what ?

  19. #19

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    First fish on the fly was a Brown trout on the upper Deschutes, first in ALaska was a Grayling on the Chena.

  20. #20
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    I'm still waiting. lol. Technique, tippet/leader length have had me a bit puzzled. Add a weight or not?

    If it was easy, everyone would be doing it.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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