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Thread: unknown primer

  1. #1
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    Default unknown primer

    I found some brand new brass in the garage that I prepared and primed and then forgot about. I dont remember if they have magnum or standard primers seated. Is there any way to remove these live primers? Or should I just throw them out? thx

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    is it a cal that you would have used one or the other?
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    Maybe the load you are gonna use them for doesn't care if it's Mag. primers, or not. ???

    If they are big Mag. cases, or you're gonna load them with ball powder, you might want a Mag. primer, but in many cases, at least, it doesn't matter that much. When you make up a new load, you can use either.

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  4. #4

    Default Not that I would suggest it to someone else,

    but I have removed live primers by VERY GENTLY running the case through the sizing die with the depriming rod run quite a ways out. Just go easy, no quick movements. I'd toss the primers, but save the cases.

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    The cases are 270 win. At the time I was using standard primers under imr 4350 with 130 grain partitions for one load and magnum primers under imr 7828 with 150 grain partitions. I just received my brand new model 70 in 270 win so I get to start working on some new loads for it anyway. I'll just use those cases for my starting point and charge them with a very safe load for either primer. thx

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I've removed a fair number of live primers by carefully running them through a fl sizer. I've also been loading long enough to have some cases I prepped and no clue as to what primer I used. Something to be said for a ziplock back and a sharpy.

    I wouldn't hesitate to use unknown primers for plinking loads, but I wouldn't use them for load work as I don't see what you'd benefit when you don't know what primer it is and you'll just have to start all over again.

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    Chock it up to experience and load them up with a medium load for off hand practice. Why even mess with depriming them. Besides, most ammo should be fire formed anyhow to fit the chamber before working up a load.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    Chock it up to experience and load them up with a medium load for off hand practice. Why even mess with depriming them. Besides, most ammo should be fire formed anyhow to fit the chamber before working up a load.
    +1 for Randy! There's no reason to discard hard to find components. Granted they shouldn't be used for load development, but they'd be great to break-in your new rifle. If you don't subscribe to the break-in theory, then they're great to shoot just to get the feel for your rifle. Load 'em with a midrange load and shoot just for the fun of shooting!

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    Chock it up to experience and load them up with a medium load for off hand practice. Why even mess with depriming them. Besides, most ammo should be fire formed anyhow to fit the chamber before working up a load.
    question on that....doesn't sticking it BACK into a FL die defeat that purpose ?????
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    sound advice paul h. gonna load moderatly and go for some much needed offhand shooting.

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Difference

    I firstly would question how they were stored. In a damp garage they might not be good any more. In an airtight container then may be they are fine.

    I would then examine the reloading data for both standard and magnum loads for the round you are going to load to see the differences using the same powder.

    I would then load for the magnum, which might take a little less powder and reduce 10%. I would also only load 5 rounds.

    Then test the five and watch for signs of pressure (primers, extraction).

    If everything is fine with pressure and they all fire, then load the rest for practice rounds.

    If the first five do not fire 100% then it might be time to cut-your-losses and de-prime.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    question on that....doesn't sticking it BACK into a FL die defeat that purpose ?????
    Not if you adjust the die to just barely touch the shoulder. Essentially you're using your FL sizer to neck size, and it should just barely bump the shoulder back to allow easy and reliable feeding and chambering.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by islander338 View Post
    I found some brand new brass in the garage that I prepared and primed and then forgot about. I dont remember if they have magnum or standard primers seated. Is there any way to remove these live primers? Or should I just throw them out? thx

    I also have removed live primers by running them through a FL sizer die. What would have happened if one had exploded? I don't know....none of mine ever did.

    However, if you want to play it safe, just live-fire them first (without powder or bullet) then run them through the sizer die. I'd run a cleaning patch through your bore if you do the live-fire procedure, because, for some reason, this leaves more crud behind than live ammo does. Bear in mind a primer all by itself makes quite a bit of noise, so choose location to live-fire accordingly. (not on your back porch in the middle of the city)
    I've been known to stick the muzzle right up against a 2X4 or 2x6, setting flat on the floor, to "muffle" the sound.
    Make DARN sure there's no live ammo in the gun, if you do this....
    (it doesn't work with revolvers, or any other gun with a cylinder/barrel gap...you'll still get lots of noise)
    Of course: above info posted for "educational" purposes only....I'm not suggesting that anyone do this...do so at your own risk. (And, don't let your kids see you do this. It's one of those "do as I say, not as I do" things...)

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    Default Fear Not, you have many options and the worst would work fine.

    Well, Shucky Gee:

    If you're bent on wasting the primers, you can easily remove them with an RCBS Universal Decapping Die. OR, a hand decapping die.

    Setting a primer off (One at a time) is no beeg deel if you stay back some, but it's NOISY, and Sudden Like, enough to make you jump, or your heart go flippity flop.

    And, of course, your wifey might think you finally went and done it, shot yerself, or had a turrible accident, so you should warn her, so she doesn't get her hopes up.

    I speak from experience, having set off primers before by placing the case in a Vise, and using a Nail and Hammer. (At arms length, of course.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    question on that....doesn't sticking it BACK into a FL die defeat that purpose ?????
    Not if you adjust the die just enough so the case can chamber. This insures the brass will not be reworked any more than possible.
    Every resizing die should be adjusted for each rifle. I use a different die set for each rifle in the same caliber.
    Tennessee

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